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#1381 Deinonychus

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Posted 21 March 2016 - 06:19 PM

Les Rameaux is the third of Langlais's "3 poèmes évangéliques" but it is not nearly as popular as the second of the set, "la nativité". I couldn't find a recording on YouTube, but there are CD recordings by George Baker on the organ of St Sernin, Toulouse (a fine Cavaillé-Coll) and by Naji Hakim on the Georg Stahlhuth organ of Saint-Martin de Dudelange in Luxembourg. You may find them on your music streaming service of choice. The Hakim recording is a lot clearer but both are fine performances.

#1382 DaveHarries

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Posted 21 March 2016 - 10:25 PM

Hello Dave - no, that's not quite right. These are entirely separate pieces. "Les Rameaux" (The Palms - as you rightly say) is the third of Trois Poèmes Evangéliques. Meanwhile Hommage à Rameau is something different altogether. It was originally a set of six pieces written in memory of, or as a tribute to Jean-Philippe Rameau, the French Baroque composer. All the best; Martin.

Thanks Martin. I had never heard of a piece called "Les Rameaux" so was unsure if I had the right one anyway.

 

Dave



#1383 DaveHarries

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Posted 07 April 2016 - 08:20 PM

This sounds splendid. Finnish organist Kalevi Kiviniemi playing the Toccata from Widor's 5th Symphony on the organ of St. Ouen, Rouen.

 

Dave

                     

#1384 DaveHarries

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Posted 21 June 2016 - 11:03 PM

Some music from Lubeck. The original Marienkirche (St. Mary's Church) was destroyed in WW2 which caused the loss of a 19th Century organ by Schulze and also the Totentanz chapel organ, parts of which dated (according to Peter Hurfords's "Making Music On The Organ" book) as far back as 1476-7 (Hauptwerk and some of the Pedal division) with additions in 1557-8 (Ruckpositiv), 1621-2 (Brustwerk and enlarged Pedal). Luckily, however, the church of St. Jakobi, Lubeck survived the war and so, therefore, did its main organ which contains, according to the church's website - http://www.st-jakobi....php/die-orgeln - pipes dating perhaps as far back as 1466 / 1504 with additions in 1573 and 1673 (the weblink refers to the "historic pipe inventory" of 22 stops). I presume the case also goes back to at least the 1570s work although the website does not say. The website is in German so some use of Google Translate (or a similar site) may be needed.

 

Picture of the gallery organ:

https://www.flickr.c...2010/4919698320

 

Musically, here is Frantisek Beer with an improvisation on a Toccata. I presume this is played on the main gallery organ.....

 

..... and a piece by J.L Krebs (1713-1780) which sounds like it is certainly played on the main organ.

 

In the first clip, at about 1:55, you can see a view of the church with not only the gallery organ but another instrument on the right which it would seem, from the weblink earlier, could be partly almost as old as the main organ.

 

I have to admit that, in the piece of music, there is a tune at about 1:30-1:35 in which sounds to me like a slight variation of part of the tune of "Twinkle Twinkle Little Star". Sounds like a very nice instrument. One advantage of having an organ in existence where parts of it are as old as 1466 is that we can get some idea, perhaps, of how instruments of that era - such as the lost Totentanz chapel one of the Marienkirche - would have sounded.

 

HTIOI,

Dave



#1385 Vox Humana

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Posted 21 June 2016 - 11:33 PM

Dave, I think you had a cut-and-paste glitch in the post above: you've posted the same link twice.



#1386 sprondel

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Posted 22 June 2016 - 08:24 AM

In the first clip, at about 1:55, you can see a view of the church with not only the gallery organ but another instrument on the right which it would seem, from the weblink earlier, could be partly almost as old as the main organ.

The smaller organ dates from about the same time as the larger one. It was built in two stages in 1467/1515 by unknown builders, and was rebuilt and enlarged in 1636/7 by Friedrich Stellwagen, one of the most important North-German builders of the era whose main achievement is the large and incredibly beautiful 24-foot organ at St Mary’s, Stralsund, which has been restored around 2000 to its original state.

 

The small organ at St Jakobi is one of the most important landmark instruments in the North. After much enlargement and rebuilding, which included the case (the rebuilt one, incidentally, was drawn once by A. G. Hill), it was restored in 1977 by Hillebrand of Hannover, with reconstruction of the original case and stoplist and slight enlargment of the much tampered-with pedal. The original Subbass, then lost, had been in lead, and at first, the organbuilders couldn’t find lead with the right amount of contamination so that the pipes could actually support themselves. The builders then turned to a church in the Netherlands which got its roof re-leaded, bought the centuries-old lead sheets at a bargain prince, and fashioned the new Subbass from those.

 

The Great sports an almost entirely original chorus of gothic origin, while most of the remaining pipes were built by Stellwagen, except the pedal, which was almost completely new in 1977. Find a stoplist and history (in German) here. Harald Vogel recorded vol. 1 of his complete Buxtehude here. The sound is incomparable – so much depth and sweetness, and a plenum of wonderful blend, balance and control.

 

Best,

Friedrich



#1387 DaveHarries

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Posted 23 June 2016 - 05:33 PM

Dave, I think you had a cut-and-paste glitch in the post above: you've posted the same link twice.

Well spotted, and thanks. Link corrected.

 

Dave



#1388 Colin Harvey

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Posted 07 August 2016 - 09:44 PM

Here's the best video I've yet seen of Saint-Sulpice, showing off this organ's many incredible features, like the quadruple rise reservoirs, the barker lever stop actions.

Also remarkable for its stunning aural recording and performance, this time of non French music, Mendelssohn's piano prelude and fugue in E minor, another stunning performance by Daniel Roth.

https://youtu.be/1V2xhAdtodM

#1389 flūte harmonique

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Posted 26 August 2016 - 07:20 AM

Widor in Saint-Eustache by Baptiste-Florian Marle-Ouvrard

 



#1390 flūte harmonique

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Posted 26 August 2016 - 07:22 AM

Pierre Pincemaille in Saint-Denis

 



#1391 Choir_Man

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Posted 01 September 2016 - 03:46 PM

Some fine young organists playing at the recent 'Young Talents' recital at Nancy Cathedral.

https://www.youtube....h?v=KRxV0X7XNJM

 

Sorry I haven't worked out how to embed videos yet.

 



#1392 DaveHarries

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Posted 06 September 2016 - 08:34 PM

Some brilliant playing here by Paul Jacobs on the organ of Crystal Cathedral (as it was then known) and all from memory too! Well deserved standing ovation at the end.

 

Dave



#1393 DaveHarries

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Posted 26 September 2016 - 09:26 PM

Another one from the Crystal Cathedral (as it was then): Pierre Cochereau playing a short piece.

 

Dave



#1394 Vox Humana

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Posted 13 October 2016 - 09:58 PM

Splendid panache here.  I wish I could have played it half as well when I was young.  I doubt I could get anywhere near it today.



#1395 Choir_Man

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Posted 25 October 2016 - 02:42 PM

Back to the UK, and here is an (almost) hour long demonstration of the Harrison organ in All Saints Tooting.
 
https://www.youtube....h?v=_7jV9KD0fyU



#1396 Choir_Man

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Posted 18 November 2016 - 04:02 PM

Whilst in Paris, the titulaires at St Eustache give a tour of their instrument. (with subtitles for the non-francophones)

 

https://www.youtube....h?v=RVeswROIeIM 



#1397 flūte harmonique

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Posted 29 December 2016 - 06:02 PM

Debussy at Saint-Eustache

 

 

https://www.youtube....hare_video_user



#1398 Deinonychus

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Posted 01 January 2017 - 01:26 AM

Happy New Year! I came across this extraordinary video of Olivier Latry improvising on the Fritts organ at Notre Dame University. Impressive stop management, including the use of a foot at one point.

#1399 DaveHarries

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Posted 19 February 2017 - 07:15 PM

One from the Mormon Tabernacle, Salt Lake City (USA): an arragement, with vocals (!!), of the Toccata from CM Widor's 5th Symphony involving the choir of the Mormon Tabernacle.

 

Dave



#1400 DaveHarries

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Posted 23 April 2017 - 11:04 PM

Happy New Year! I came across this extraordinary video of Olivier Latry improvising on the Fritts organ at Notre Dame University. Impressive stop management, including the use of a foot at one point.

Golly. That is a most interesting way to do stop management!

 

Meanwhile here is the kind of hymn that you might not normally expect to hear in a cathedral. It is the anthem of 1. FC Köln. The occasion was prior to a home football game: the German information about the video also says this:

 

"Before the first home match of the 1. FC Cologne more than a thousand fans of the 1. FC Köln celebrated an ecumenical service. Pray for respect and joy in the game. Club President Werner Spinner was enthusiastic: "It was an incredible moment when the FC anthem played on the organ in the cathedral." After the noon prayer on Saturday, he said that in the coming year this institution would already be a "Cologne tradition".

 

At one point you can see a couple of nuns in the congregation: I wonder what they thought?!

 

Dave






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