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  2. John Robinson

    Organs on Google Street-view

    Another one, which I am fortunate to possess, is one LP in a set of five: OR-EX 71 featuring pieces by Fischer, Froberger, Kerll, Muffatt and Kolb. Very helpfully, it includes detailed registration information for each of those pieces.
  3. oscar_rook

    Organs on Google Street-view

    There are several other recordings made at Weingarten which haven't yet been mentioned: 1. André Isoir recorded three volumes of JSB works there in Oct 1988 and 1990 on Calliope (CAL9710, CAL9715, and CAL9717). 2. Franz Raml recorded music by Justin Heinrich Knecht in Oct 1996 on MDG (MDG 614 0764-2) 3. Franz Raml recorded music by Johann Ludwig Krebs in 1999, again on MDG (MDG 614 0971-2) 4. Heinrich Hamm recorded a mixed recital in June 1986 on Audite (Audite 95.408) 5. Ludger Lohmann recorded music by Johann Heinrich Christian Rinck in Sept1996 on Naxos (Naxos 8.553925) I don't know whether any of them is currently available. Kind regards Oscar
  4. Colin Pykett

    Organs on Google Street-view

    It certainly is of interest, and when I went on Amazon just now there was one seller offering it at just over £6 incl postage (new). Can't go wrong at that price. The demo clips sounded very good so I've ordered it. Many thanks for the tip. CEP
  5. Neil Crawford

    Norwich Catherdral Organ Rebuild

    The Dean and Chapter have awarded the contract to Harrison & Harrison. https://www.cathedral.org.uk/docs/default-source/Music/v2315_norwich-cathedral-brochure_spreads.pdf?sfvrsn=0
  6. OrganistOnTheHill

    Easy Organ Pieces & leading a congregation?

    Hello everyone, I am a beginner organist at a school (very fortunate enough to have an access to a Willis & Co Organ and a Lewis & Co Organ!) and I am preparing towards my first school chapel service as a organist. (We have two short morning prayers in a week). I need least two pieces, first piece for the entry of the congregation and clergies and a second piece for the exit of clergies and the congregation. I also have to prepare a hymn, which I would like some advice on tackling on practicing. I was around Grade 7 on piano and stopped for a couple of years. I fiddled around on the piano since last year and got better enough to reach the approval from the director of music to take up the organ. I am working on Bach's 'Es ist das heils uns kommen her' at the moment. 1. May I have some tips on tackling a hymn? Transposing, volume (selecting proper stops for a hymn and the volume) and etc. 2. Suggestions of quite easy manual only organ voluntaries or pieces that are suitable for exit/entry for chapel. (Or maybe very simple pedalling?) 3. Other tips on leading the congregation and tips of being an organist in a chapel service. Thank you!
  7. SomeChap

    Organs on Google Street-view

    Thanks - tempted to look up the Piet Kee recording. There is also a good disk of Krebs by Gerhard Gnann on Naxos (£8 on Amazon UK - might also be on Spotify etc?); it was my introduction to the Weingarten organ if that's of any interest to anyone. SC
  8. Colin Pykett

    Organs on Google Street-view

    The various youtube clips of the Weingarten organ provide a great service because there don't seem to be many CDs of it around at present, at least at reasonable prices (some were being advertised on Amazon at over £300 when I looked recently). However there is a good one by Piet Kee available at 'normal' CD prices of around £12 or so, including on Amazon (Chandos CHAN 0520). Recorded in 1991, I have it and it is wonderful. It demonstrates all the 'fancy' stops to which David alluded, though not the Vox Humana to the extent some of the youtube clips do. Both this disc and the youtube recordings suggest that this incredible creation is still in fine fettle considering its unbelievable mechanical complexity. I alluded above to a study I'm doing of the acoustical physics of this Vox stop, and have made a little more progress in the last few weeks. If it's of any interest, I'm reaching a point where I think it's misguided to try to explain its tonal character in terms of the phonetic formants of the human speaking voice as some other researchers have done. In my view it is better explained in terms of the character of the human singing voice, which is quite a different thing, especially the voice of a trained adult male singer (i.e. not a child or a female). When you do this there are some features identifiable in the sound of the Weingarten Vox which also appear in the voice of a trained tenor. This might explain the extraordinary humanoid quality of this stop, at least over part of its compass. But the most remarkable thing of all is that Gabler was able to capture it in organ pipes at a time when he could not have possibly known about any of the physics stuff which I have been drawing on in this study. Listening to (and looking at) this instrument has brought a lump to my throat more than once, and I sometimes wonder why we have bothered to build any other sort of organ since when such miracles were around at that time. For all our knowledge and technology, the only improvement we have been able to provide to Gabler's masterpiece is to have given it a decent, or at least more convenient, wind supply. CEP
  9. David Drinkell

    Organs on Google Street-view

    Yes, it was an experience which has remained in my memory all my life (I was only in my teens at the time and I am now - heaven help me! - 62, but I can still hear that sound). I would underline, though, that although the "fancy" stops at Weingarten are justly famed and extremely musical in their context, the really stunning thing about Weingarten is the pleno, with all those multi-rank mixtures. Ton Koopman's Great C minor gives some idea:
  10. SomeChap

    Organs on Google Street-view

    Thanks Colin, that is indeed an extraordinary Vox. Here's another splendid view which was hiding at the back of my mind but I couldn't put my finger on at the time - Cologne, St Cunibert (Kuhn, 1993).
  11. Last week
  12. AJJ

    York Minster

    There was apparently a presentation to Organists’ Assocations recently by Robert Sharpe on what is likely to be done to the organ. Can anyone report back please? A
  13. John Mitchell

    Prepared For

    I see now that one of the organs I was thinking of (Rochdale Parish Church) has finally got it's prepared for stops installed. It's taken 52 years, but I guess better late than never.
  14. S_L

    Buckfast Abbey

    "wasteful, badly thought-out and, in places, gimmicky" was how the new organ at Buckfast, on paper anyway, was described earlier - and not by me, I hesitate to add! I presume that you wouldn't agree AJJ! I look forward to hearing it one day and I shall make an effort the next time I am in the UK to visit Buckfast. I look forward to hearing other's opinions too once they have had a chance to hear it 'in the flesh'!!!
  15. Paul Isom

    New Organ Piece by Parry

    Printed off and turned into a booklet already - many thanks for the pointer. I wonder how many pieces like this have quickly slipped through the net without members of the forum noticing. Time to do a little searching.......!
  16. AJJ

    Buckfast Abbey

    Ok, here we go.... The Quire Organ has some lovely noises - relaxed reed and principal choruses, endless variety of blending and characterful flutes, pleasing strings and celestes, nice small solo reeds and a decent full plenum with small 32’ reed and pedal bass. Bach came over very well and the general open toe voicing of much of the fluework actually sounded a bit like the former Walker/Downes instrument. There are birdsongs and bagpipes but these do not detract and I can imagin that it will accompany the monastic choir or whatever else is put before it admirably and with endless variety. This section happily fills the building with sound and reacts nicely to the acoustic - full of audience when we heard it and empty when we popped back the next morning. The ‘west’ organ is very loud when used flat out and although supposedly designed to sound French doesn’t sound much like any C-Cs I have heard. There are some nice sounds back there but the big solo reeds sound to me at least more like English Tubas than anything at N-D in Paris. Some grand effects can be experienced using both sections together but I would imagine caution is needed as with everything ‘on’ there is a huge sound and clarity can suffer. Full organ can be heard from the restaurant across the green! The mobile Quire console is quite full of electronics which all worked well as did the action with no sense of time lag etc. The visible woodwork is of a high standard and blends in with the general feel of the Abbey and the visible pipes above the stalls sparkle away nicely! I could quite happily live with this instrument week in, week out but would possibly feel just a touch of guilty pleasure in that it is not mechanical, has masses of wizzardry, can be extremely powerfull and has a stoplist that looks at least like something I might have devised as a youth! Martin Baker’s recital was a triumph of programming to show off the organ and yet give us all some decent organ music. His improvisation at the end was virtuosic and quite amazing but not flashy or showing off for the sake of it. I had forgotten what a superbly musical player he is! There were two well deserved standing ovations and....he plays in socks as do I! A
  17. S_L

    Buckfast Abbey

    Tell us more AJJ!
  18. AJJ

    Buckfast Abbey

    Fantastic recital tonight by Martin Baker and a model of really effective programming with virtuoso but un-showy playing. By and large the organ aquitted itself well, the Quire section especially with loads of clear choruses and lovely quiet voices. The West end section is very loud, not especially French sounding and somewhere up there is something that sounds like a H&H Tuba from about 1910! A
  19. S_L

    New Organ Piece by Parry

    Absolutely Martin. Thank you for that Vox!!!
  20. Martin Cooke

    New Organ Piece by Parry

    Thanks very much for alerting us Vox. A lovely addition to the Elegy repertoire. Martin.
  21. Vox Humana

    New Organ Piece by Parry

    Members might be interested in this newly published Elegie from 1918: http://imslp.org/wiki/Elegie_(Parry,_Charles_Hubert_Hastings)#IMSLP520577
  22. sbarber49

    Recitals

    Pity it's on a Sunday morning when organists tend to be otherwise engaged.
  23. S_L

    Recitals

    The website gives the title of Prom 10 as 'Faure, Frank and Widor's Toccata' - so, presumably, she is only playing the last movement of the Widor - at 6 minutes long. The site also gives Iveta Apkalna as the only performer so it looks as if this is one of Bax's arrangements of Bach - for organ!! Bax did arrange BWV572 for piano - perhaps this is an arrangement of an arrangement! But it would appear that no orchestra is involved! I normally comment on the 'Proms' programme because there is, nearly always, so much exciting music to listen to. This year I haven't had a chance to have a look but I did notice that Prom 4 includes Messiaen's Turangalila Sumphony - a singularly amazing piece of music!
  24. iy45

    Recitals

    I've given up on the Proms website until they get their act together, but I see that they've timed Widor 5 at 6 minutes and the Franck Trois Pieces at 11 minutes, and goodness knows what the Bax arrangement of BWV 572 is supposed to be, but my bet is that the reference is to an orchestration of it. Ian
  25. Vox Humana

    Recitals

    The programme for the 2018 Proms season is out. Prom 10 is an organ recital by the Latvian organist Iveta Apkalna: 22 July -- 11.00 Iveta Apkalna Symphony no.5 -- Widor Trois pièces pour grand orgue -- Franck Pavane -- Fauré, arr. Apkalna Fantasia in G major BWV 572 -- Bach, arr Arnold Bax Variations on a Theme of Paganini (A Study for Pedals) -- Thalben-Ball Deux Évocations --Escaich Also, Prom 17 (27 Jul) includes Parry's "Hear my words, ye people", although since no organist is credited it may be with orchestral accompaniment.
  26. Martin Cooke

    Bullock - Introduction and Fugue

    This piece, and a small number of others by Bullock, is available in the RCO library.
  27. Zimbelstern

    Hymn tune SALZBURG

    After many hours researching this question, here’s where I’ve got to so far: The attribution of the harmonisation of the hymn tune Salzburg to J.S. Bach in all hymn books I have examined, must be wrong. It was extant before Bach was born, being published by Pachelbel in 1683 at the beginning of his choral partita Alle Menschen müssen sterben in Musikalische Sterbensgedanken. It should be noted that the metre of this chorale is 8787. This chorale harmonisation of Alle Menschen müssen sterben, later given the BWV number 262, was included in the collection of 371 Bach chorales published by C.P.E Bach, but there is no extant work of Bach’s in which it features, so it may be assumed his son found it amongst his manuscripts and included it, perhaps thinking the harmonisation was his father’s work. The collection of 371 chorales, republished several times during the 19th century, may have been the source of the choral harmonisation used by the compilers of the first edition of Hymns Ancient and Modern in 1861, the musical editor of which was William Henry Monk. As far as the melody is concerned, the website hymnary.org states:”The tune SALZBURG, named after the Austrian city made famous by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, was first published anonymously in the nineteenth edition of Praxis Pietatis Melica (1678); in that hymnbook's twenty-fourth edition (1690) the tune was attributed to Jakob Hintze (b. Bernau, Germany, 1622; d. Berlin, Germany, 1702).” The first edition of Hymns Ancient and Modern 1861 sets the tune it calls Salzburg to the hymn “At the Lamb’s High Feast We Sing”. This hymn is a translation of the Latin hymn “Ad regias Agni dapes” by the Scottish lawyer Robert Campbell. He published it in his collection of hymns known as The St. Andrews Hymnal in 1850, two years before he became a Roman Catholic. It should be noted that the metre of “At the Lamb’s High Feast We Sing” is 77 77 D, so the German chorale has to be adapted slightly. Not having access to “The St Andrews Hymnal” it is impossible to know if Robert Campbell set it to the German chorale melody, but it seems unlikely. Zahn, the 19th century cataloguer of German choral tunes, lists Hintze’s tune (Zahn 6778) as having the metre 87878877. There is another hymn tune called Salzburg. It is a tune by Michael Haydn who lived for many years in Salzburg. The metre is 7676 however. To complicate matters even further, the following entry can be found in “Hymn Tune Names: Their Sources and Significance” by Robert McCutchan (Abingdon 1957): “Tantum Ergo [878787 (4:drmf/ s f m r) ; from Samuel Webbe's Antiphons, 1792]. Tantum ergo are the first words of Part II, the last two stanzas, of the Latin hymn beginning, "Pange lingua gloriosi." It is a part of the Benediction of the Blessed Sacrament of the Roman Church. Also called Alleluia Dulce Carmen, Benediction, Corinth, Dulce Carmen, Gloria Patri, Lebanon, St. Werbergh's, Salzburg, Walpole. Alleluia Dulce Carmen and Dulce Carmen: because used with the eleventh-century Latin hymn beginning, "Alleluia, dulce carmen." In Havergal's Psalmody (1871) it is called Salzburg because Havergal attributed it to John Michael Haydn, who lived in Salzburg for the last forty-four years of his life. In a footnote Havergal states the tune is "wrongly called Benediction or St. Werbergh." [878787 (4: d d d d). Interestingly, Samuel Webbe was organist of the Sardinian Embassy Chapel, a position which he held until 1795. He was also organist and choirmaster of chapel of the Portuguese Embassy in Lincoln’s Inn Fields, the only place in London where the Catholic liturgy could be publicly celebrated. Hymns Ancient and Modern was published in 1861 by Novello. Vincent Novello, the founder, was a Roman Catholic. As a boy, Novello was a chorister at the Sardinian Embassy Chapel where he learnt the organ from Samuel Webbe; and from 1796 to 1822 he became in succession organist of the Sardinian, Spanish and Portuguese (in South Street, Grosvenor Square) chapels, and from 1840-43 of St. Mary Moorfields. Novello, a huge admirer of Mozart, and his wife visited Salzburg in 1829 to see Mozart’s widow Constanze and deliver a gift of money. So we have a group of very high churchmen, compiling a high church hymnbook, published by a Roman Catholic publishing firm, looking for a hymn tune for an English translation of a Latin hymn translated by a Roman Catholic. They were looking for a tune with 7777 metre, but knew that 8787 might work with a little adaptation. They had tunes, metres and texts swirling around in their heads, and countless hymnbooks and tunes in front of them, including probably Samuel Webbe’s with its tune for Dulce Carmen composed by Michael Haydn from Salzburg, which also fits Tantum Ergo, and thus Pange Lingua, the tune of which is included in Hymns Ancient and Modern adapted to 8787, although set to the hymn Now my Soul Thy Voice Upraising (including Neale’s translation of Pange Lingua - Of the Glorious Body Telling - itself would have been a step too far, because of its Catholic theology - Neale had already been accused of being a Vatican agent in the Church of England and had even been beaten up by a Protestant mob in Sussex.) The problem is that they need a tune for an 8 line stanza. They have J.S. Bach’s chorales in front of them and realise that the tune of Alle Menschen müssen sterben can be made to fit with a slight adjustment. But what to call it? Giving a Roman Catholic hymn translated from Latin by a Scottish Roman Catholic a German Protestant town name would seem ridiculous. But Salzburg? Perfect!
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