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Mander Organs

bam

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About bam

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    Advanced Member
  • Birthday 04/04/1956

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  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Whitchurch, Buckinghamshire
  1. Hewins Organ Builder, Stratford-upon-Avon

    Something reminded me of an article and after some rummaging I found it: JBIOS 18, by James Berrow. An account of the Whinfields (with an 'h' !) and the organ at The Wyche - this is the Malvern instrument noted above by David.
  2. Hewins Organ Builder, Stratford-upon-Avon

    Very interesting re the Winfield connection - I had heard of him but not realised I had played one of his instruments. I wonder what the Hewins spec was? Everyone found the pistons very intriguing, once we had realised what they were. The first player came back from the console and confidently stated that there were no pistons!
  3. Hewins Organ Builder, Stratford-upon-Avon

    The Bucks OA visited this one a few years ago: http://www.npor.org.uk/NPORView.html?RI=D01532 The action to the manuals was rather slow and the pedals slightly slower than the manuals. The pistons rose vertically from the back of the manuals so were pressed down to activate. The octave couplers were essential to get any brightness - I've a feeling there was a Swell Octave to Great, not mentioned on NPOR. Quite a contrast to the Parish Church and the Guild Chapel!
  4. Lytham St Cuthberts

    It's now in Abergavenny Priory - I played it last year and it is a remarkable little instrument with real 'presence' in the building, in a very helpful acoustic. http://www.npor.org.uk/NPORView.html?RI=V00348
  5. Bristol Catheral - Organ Appeal

    I understood that the conversion of Malvern to EP was because no builders would take the commercial risk of restoring the pneumatics - it was so congested inside that if anything went wrong, it would all have to come apart again to fix. An example locally is the tonally rather nice but internally very congested Binns in Great Missenden parish church. The pneumatics were restored in 2006 but problems started soon afterwards, apparently revolving around failures and leaks in the action tubing. It was converted to EP a couple of years ago. It's in a north east chancel case and there is a small window in the otherwise solid west wall of the chamber, previously blocked by wooden pedal pipes. In 2006 they were Haskelled and the window opened up - the difference in the amount of sound reaching the nave was remarkable. Robin Jennings' article in the current issue of 'Organ Building' on his new organ at Wolvercote is most interesting. By 'restricting the cost of the action' (i.e., going for a completely mechanical action) they were able to increase the spec by a couple of stops and hopefully increase its longevity. I would certainly be very happy to trade pistons on a 16 stop 2 manual for long term reliability, especially with adjustable composition pedals, with a bonus of extra stops and the pleasure of a modern mechanical action.
  6. Recitals

    Friday, 22 September, 7.15 for 7.45pm at St John the Evangelist, Whitchurch, Buckinghamshire HP22 4JZ: Timothy Byram-Wigfield plays a programme to include Handel, Bach, Guilmant, Saint-Saens, Elgar, Walton and Vierne on the 1880 Porritt and will talk about his experiences at St George's Chapel, Windsor and elsewhere. Tickets £12 on the door or £10 in advance from Parrott's Farm Shop, Beechmoor Farm (HP22 4LG).
  7. Recitals

    Buckingham Parish Church on Saturday 24 June at 7.30pm: Milton Keynes Chorale presents a Durufle Feast, including the Requiem, Quatre Motets, Organ Suite Op. 5 and Solo Items. Conductor: Victoria Ely, Organist Douglas Tang, Mezzo Soprano Hannah Poulson, Baritone Ben Tomlin. Tickets £15 Adults, £5 under 18s and students.
  8. Music That We'd Rather Not Play

    I played S, JS for the first time earlier this year - not one of my favourites but even the oldies (I.e., older than me!) in the congregation seem to like it, What did surprise me was the way it's laid out in the alleged 'Organ Edition' of the new A&M with a page turn between the verse and refrain. I reset it with Musescore and it fits very nicely on one side of A4.
  9. Where is better for a manual 16' flue?

    The Swell Lieblich Bourdon (TC) on our Porritt is a very good stop. It adds just the right amount of depth to full organ, it's a lovely flute played an octave up and can also be used an octave up with the Vox Angelica either as a soft solo (very useful if the Oboe is out of tune!) or soft chorus. Perhaps it looks odd on paper but it works really well.
  10. An article that could have been included in the BIOS Journal on the RFH organ was a look at the tender proposals. Reading between the lines in 'Baroque Tricks', they were from Harrison, Willis and Walker. Another interesting one would be a compare and contrast (musical and technical) between the RFH and Colston Hall instruments, from someone who knows both.
  11. It's on the H&H website today under Projects and Plans -> Forthcoming. There are photos of the restored ex-Manchester console on the Selby website: http://www.selbyabbeyorganappeal.org.uk/restoration.html
  12. Most bizarre specifications?

    This is an interesting example, which sounds a lot better in the church than at the console: http://www.npor.org.uk/NPORView.html?RI=N09233
  13. Nigel, Church - Lincln

    I understand It's the organ formerly in Hucknall Parish Church and then Sedburgh School - apparently the church is highly delighted with the result.
  14. Sure - I took it during one of the post-restoration events. PM me if you want the full res version and I'll email it to you.
  15. Still in place at the RFH console....... I was told that when the pipes were cleaned in the recent restoration, a layer of brown varnish was removed - years of nicotine deposits (from smoking in the auditorium!).
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