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Mander Organs

Richard McVeigh

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About Richard McVeigh

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    Advanced Member
  • Birthday 04/12/1983

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    dj_richy@hotmail.com
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    http://www.richardmcveigh.co.uk
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  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Winchester Cathedral
  1. Ring Banks Music in York, they always used to have a copy. It's published by Banks Music aswell, if I remember correctly.
  2. I'm surprised you say this, as by the sounds of it you were sat in the quire and I've always found the organ very clear when sitting east of it as it speaks so well into the quire. The clarity is lost once you get into the nave...?
  3. Is this the Koopman recording you heard? Tom Koopman BWV 544
  4. I can't believe that this list was edited. How utterly RIDICULOUS - I mean, why?? Can anyone tell me why on earth some people think that only the notable people should stay on the list? The whole list is a fascinating guide as to who was where, no matter how notable they may be. I'm sorry, that made me really cross as there is absolutely no reason what so ever for editing it. Surely the amount of contributions from various people just goes to show how non-pointless it is.
  5. Not too sure about Assistant Organists, but how about these: List of organ scholars at British cathedrals and parish churches List of organ scholars at British universities and colleges Also, some cathedral articles on Wikipedia have lists of their organists, eg: Lichfield Cathedral Chichester Cathedral Lincoln Cathedral York Minster Westminster Abbey Winchester Cathedral infact, most of them seem to...
  6. I'm sorry to quote you on this, but in my opinion I think that you are wrong in saying that about the St Paul's Psalter. I do rather enjoy psalms and, depending on what mood I'm in, sometimes think the psalm(s) are the best part of the liturgy. I'm almost (but not quite) embarrassed to say that I have the complete Priory, complete Hyperion (St Paul's), King's Cambridge, Westminster Abbey and John's Cambridge recordings of the psalms - particularly to hear different interpretations of such familiar texts. I hope you don't mind me doing so, but I pick you up on your point for two reasons: Wouldn't it be awfully boring if every choir did the same pointing; Quick moving harmony doesn't work in an acoustic like St Paul's. If you look closely at the St Paul's Psalter (or listen to the recordings if you don't have the Psalter to hand) you'll notice that John Scott stretches out the bars of the chant within the line of the text so that the same chord is held for longer, for example: 11. Tush say they * | how should ยท God per- | ceive it : whereas somewhere like Winchester Cathedral sing 11. Tush say they * how should | God per- | ceive it : As I'm sure you're aware, the strong syllable of the word needs to come at the beginning of the bar, and therefore John needed to find the next best word to change on earlier in the line, if you see what I mean. Also, the tempi at which the St Paul's Psalter was recorded makes the pointing work, whereas if a choir sang the same pointing at speech rhythm the pointing wouldn't make any sense. Lets not forget that the St Paul's Psalter was written for use in the liturgy in the Cathedral, and not specifically for the Hyperion recordings where the microphones are only a few feet away from the choir. People attending a service in St Paul's are often at a long distance from the choir and therefore if the conductor isn't careful with his choice of tempi the words can easily get lost in the acoustic. The words are meant to be heard by all, not just by those who got there early enough to be sitting near the choir stalls. The sheer amount of word painting from the organ, the famous St Paul's acoustics, the clarity of the words, the beautiful choice of chants, the vast amount of drama gained from the huge amount of dynamics and different speeds dependent on the mood of a particular psalm, and the fantastic ensemble makes this complete recording of the psalms by John Scott one of the best on the market in my opinion, and the 12 discs take a proud place on my iPod. Love it or hate it, I think these recordings deserve to be heard by all.
  7. The recording engineers hung the microphones from the central tower, therefore getting a rather unbalanced sound of the organ. Buy the new DVD that JSW recently did as the organ sounds fantastic on it.
  8. Fantasic! All from memory aswell!
  9. Depends on what it means by 'electric', its certianly not a speaker if thats what you mean? I took some pictures of it before I became a southerner...
  10. Thank you very much! It was acutally my new boss who pointed me in the direction of this thread. I find score reading the most essential skill to have when working with a choir. I remember at York being asked/told to accompany Lassus' Missa Bell' Amfitrit' altera 5 minutes before the Eucharist, and thinking that I was glad that I could actually do that sort of stuff. Not overly sure how important it is to be able to sight read difficult chromatic organ pieces though!
  11. How much of me can you see?? I haven't seen this yet...! As for the Regent recording, I actually play a few notes in the Dupre, I wonder if you can tell which ones. I also haven't heard this recording yet, but its a good programme of some unknown stuff, and the Cochereau Symphonie which John transcribed is definatlely worth hearing.
  12. Gosh, that was fast...
  13. This year there are two sets of Recitals, one to include the complete organ works of Olivier Messiaen, and the others are normal Saturday evening recitals. Details are below: Hope to see you there!
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