Jump to content
Mander Organs

Phoneuma

Members
  • Content count

    49
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Community Reputation

0 Neutral

About Phoneuma

  • Rank
    Advanced Member

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  1. Nigel Allcoat

    My apologies for expressing an opinion, and here's me thinking that forums existed for an exchange of information, debate or mutual discussion. With that I bid farewell for the second time in two years, no wonder that there have been so few posts of late.
  2. Nigel Allcoat

    I'll second that! Very elegantly put and thoughtful. If only those in positions of power had as much honesty and humility. Grayling was, without doubt, one of the most dangerous and damaging Ministers of Justice we've had the misfortune to suffer.
  3. Arthur Butterworth (1923-2014)

    Good to see that Arthur is getting some recognition now, neglected by the establishment for far too long. Having lived in the same town for 20 years he was a very good friend and certainly knew his stuff. The Partita is a rather arid sort of piece, inspired more by Hindemith. It had been recorded at some point by Adrian Self at Catrtmel Priory. The Sonata is a rather weightier piece and I persuaded Arthur to send Kevin Bowyer a copy shortly before AB died, Kevin was preparing the Organ Concerto for a performance in Poland. His manuscript handwriting was immaculately done, a real work of calligraphic art. He was indeed a very kindly man even though we had completely opposite musical tastes! There are some very interesting articles he wrote on Musicweb International under a series called 'Arthur Butterworth Writes' . He had a good sense of mischief at times and was a mine of really interesting tales about many musicians.
  4. Heritage Open Days

    May I put in a plug for the Heritage Open Days on behalf of All Souls Blackman Lane in Leeds which is to be held on September 10th for three days. I have posted before praising this fabulous Abbott and Smith organ and visitors would be welcome to try it out. Quite apart from the building itself which is stuffed to the rafters with some remarkable artefacts. More info can be found here, follow through the links to area and Leeds from the LH menu. http://www.heritageopendays.org.uk/directory/laa/Leeds Although I'm not the organist there Keith Senior, the incumbent organist would be most welcoming and is a veritable mine of information about all things ecclesiastical. Regards, Simon Gregory
  5. Heritage Open Days

    May I put in a plug for the Heritage Open Days on behalf of All Souls Blackman Lane in Leeds which is to be held on September 10th for three days. I have posted before praising this fabulous Abbott and Smith organ and visitors would be welcome to try it out. Quite apart from the building itself which is stuffed to the rafters with some remarkable artefacts. More info can be found here, follow through the links to area and Leeds from the LH menu. http://www.heritageopendays.org.uk/directory/laa/Leeds Although I'm not the organist there Keith Senior, the incumbent organist would be most welcoming and is a veritable mine of information about all things ecclesiastical. Regards, Simon Gregory
  6. Specification Enhancement

    Would this be at All Saints in Mickleover by any chance, it looks like it in which case I played it last year for a funeral, I was very impressed with it indeed, a powerful instrument indeed!
  7. UK 5-manuals?

    Well spotted there Mr Pykett, and here's me thinking I needed to get out more whilst amiably ambling through eBay curios.... Good to see some decent photos of the old thing which was exceedingly easy to play and find your way around and it was a real looker. I imagine the seller knew what he was doing (and I do know who it is by the way!). It would indeed feel more at home in it's original place, it would make an ideal slave console. Top marks for the eagle eye, it looks to be in pretty good condition.
  8. Just out of curiosity …

    'and something stirs within my grey matter about pipes being removed (stolen?) by an organ builder, and susbesquently replaced by new pipes. (Does anyone recall anything about this?)' The 'missing mixture' is referred to on NPOR and I have been able to check this out. The pipes were 'removed' (for which read almost certainly stolen) by the incumbent of the time, one Revd. Sanders, and it is presumed he sold them for scrap metal. Many other valuable items were ransacked from the church during this unfortunate period, including some very important plate items and sanctuary valuables, decorated with precious stones by all accounts, which were never recovered and were originally presented to the church in memory of its founder and benefactor Revd. Hook who was responsible for having the church built and was a very important influence in Leeds. There were a number of references made to this sordid saga in several issues of Private Eye which had a regular column on the place for some time before the maniac incumbent was eventually sacked by the dithering authorities. It was reported at the time that he later became a scrap metal dealer (no joke!). Charges of sexual misconduct were also made and it took an unfortunate suicide by a curate at the church to finally provoke action. These incidents are, I'm told, the tip of the iceberg and it reads like a catalogue of despair, it's hair-raising stuff. John T Jackson was responsible for replacing the stolen IV rank mixture which is now what you hear, perhaps a little louder than the original but it does complete the Great organ chorus rather well. No organ builder was ever suspected of removing the pipes at any time, they were all completely innocent and it might well be that this myth has arisen as a result of the machinations of the obviously manipulative clergy of the time, and I don't imply that many clergy were involved, just the two mavericks who seemed to be at the root of it, and an indecisive senior member. Simply for the record and to tidy up this loose end!
  9. Just out of curiosity …

    MM - I'll do some homework about the 'missing mixture', it's back now by the way and is a crowning glory of the Great Organ. I'm sure it also had something to do with a very dark phase during the 1970s when the church was almost ransacked by a progressive vicar. His modernising culminated in a curate throwing himself off a multi-storey car park which eventually caught the attention of the bishop and heads then rolled. It must have been pretty sordid as it made Private Eye at the time. I'm almost certain that the pipes weren't stolen by the builder but were flogged off by the progressive priest, but i'll get the real story soon - watch this space! You might be interested to know that the spotlight has now moved to St Aidan's Roundhay where the large Binns there has suffered recently. The bellows weights were stolen and replaced by house bricks, there is a very clear picture of these on the church's own website. The organ is not in good condition apparently. Ermysted's - I should know that as I've just retired from there having taught music for the past 20 years! John Brown is held in much reverence by many old boys of the school and is remembered fondly. And thanks to DD - me too and I think it's the best H and H I've ever played and I've led a very sheltered life!
  10. Nostell Priory

    Greetings - has anyone played this organ recently? I'm being asked to play for a family wedding there next July and I've had a quick gander at NPOR where it looks to be something pretty decent. However, we all know the paper specs. don't fully convey the actual sound and current playing condition so any helpful hints would be appreciated. It looks like it is a National Trust property licensed for marriage ceremonies. It's here on NPOR http://www.npor.org.uk/NPORView.html?RI=D03648 Thanks for any useful info.
  11. Just out of curiosity …

    'We may think of Harrison & Harrison as builders of largely pneumatic-action instruments prior to 1920 or thereabouts, yet in 1906, they had built a highly successful electro-pneumatic action organ at Skipton Parish Church, just up the road from me. ' Forgive me MM for also overlooking this one, having just returned from playing at today's Eucharist there I can only concur with your praise, although I might say that it is at Christ Church, Skipton, the parish church (Holy Trinity) having something of a less-inspiring but useful instrument buried in part of a vestry. I have the good fortune to play this H & H regularly and it is a remarkable survival of which the church is immensley proud. I do wish it had a 4' flute somewhere but that's all one can criticise it for. The church was re-ordered a few years back and the new wooden flooring together with the removal of the utilitarian pews did wonders for the sound which has a much greater spaciousness and ring (and it packed a fair wallop even before that). It looks nicer too. Much of its impact has always been its west end position although the console has been in a few different positions over the years. Apparently there were two tenders when an new organ was first mooted in 1900 or so, the other was from Willis although we have never been able to find anything more about it, it would be very interesting to have seen what they had in mind. I've always found it most odd that Elvin gives it no more than a paragraph in his book, completely overlooking its importance the use of electro-pneumatics. I hope David Drinkell doesn't mind me saying that he had a rather good time with it last year en route to somewhere further north. Up here in the 't'north' we do seem to be particularly well-blessed with many edwardian instruments of outstanding quality.
  12. Just out of curiosity …

    'We musn't, I think, overlook Abbott & Smith, who achieved a tonal quality normally the preserve of the top builders.' Absolutely spot-on with this. I've had the good fortune to try out their 'show' organ recently at All Souls Blackman Lane in Leeds and it's fantastic! A feast of wonderfully-voiced and varied flutes and a Dulciana which is quite ethereal. The chorus reeds are all superb and it's still in very good condition indeed, despite its ancient tubular pneumatics. They have a very considerate and enthusiastic organist called Keith Senior who is also a big supporter of the church and its worship, very high anglican approaching St Peter's Rome! It's well worth a visit and I can't sing its praises enough, marvellous instrument clad in stupendously carved cases, it's a cracker!
  13. Remembrance

    This is indeed a very beautiful and poignant little piece, dating from 1932 and based upon the Retreat call, renamed Sunset as Colin rightly points out. A couple of years back I spent an inordinate amount of time trying to find this music, to no avail (the Royal Marines forum even proved fruitless as they said that the army bands all have their own copies and it was never officially published). However (!) - I sat down and transcribed it as best I could from a BBC broadcast as I wanted it for our school band for a very special occasion; the presentation of a Battle of Britain Memorial Plaque to an old boy who was still alive and kicking very well indeed. He was also, to my great delight, in the same squadron as my uncle (219 squadron, Bristol Blenheims, their motto was 'From Dusk to Dawn'). I have just dug this band arrangement out as I am sure Colin might find this of use and interest (it is reduced for Organ by the way). If anyone else would like one then please send a pm. Simon Gregory
  14. Remembrance

    I found a rather good transcription of the first Wind Band Suite by Holst on imslp, composed in 1909 and first performed in 1922 so it kind of covers that era. The first movement, Chaconne, does work well. More in the marching vein but none the worse for that and if you have uniformed organisations then that sort of thing does strike a chord. The other two movements are also good. I know I mentioned it before but if anyone still wants a transcription of the Royal British Legion March then please pm me for a free and legitimate copy.
  15. I suppose this ought to go under recitals but I thought it would catch more eyes if it were listed here. I don't have much information but Philip Tordoff is giving a recital this coming Saturday, November 1st at 12.30pm. It isn't listed on organrecitals.com either. I have no other information than this and it was gleaned from a website and given to me by a colleague. Worth a visit by all accounts, it will be my own first experience and the photos alone on a previous post whet one's appetite. The organist, Kenneth Senior, is very enthusiastic about the instrument and it is in pretty good working order by all accounts.
×