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JohnR

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Posts posted by JohnR

  1. I may be able to find one for you. I have removed three CMTS systems in over the last couple of years and it may be that one or more of them used this card type. I don't have any of the parts myself but I know who has and will see what I can do.

    I wondered if you're absolutely sure this card is the cause of the symptom? I ask because I assume you've not had one to put in and try. 

    Regards,

    John R

     

     

  2. The St. Georges hall organ was a large Compton cinema organ and was sadly destroyed in WWII. The two surviving organs are also Comptons but not cinema organs. They both have Compton's luminous touch tab system for stop selection.

     

    The Broadcasting House organ is really a concert organ and has 33 ranks. It is indeed installed in a very tight space at the front of the Radio Theatre, formerly called the Concert Hall. The chamber is less than 2 metres deep which makes things very difficult even though it is quite wide and high. The organ has many windchests as only a small number are used for more than one rank and some ranks require an extra chest to complete the compass at the bass end. Broadcasting House was vastly altered internally a few years ago as part of the West End project and the cable connecting the console would have had to have been disconnected and reconnected. It was therefore decided that it would be a good time to fit a new control system requiring only a simple data connection. For reasons of cost the new system did not replace the note relays in the organ. Now that the console was easily detachable the BBC decided to keep it in a store room downstairs and get it to the studio using the piano lift when required. This idea sadly hasn't worked well. The organ has also suffered some ruptures of the leatherwork on a couple of the many wind regulators which are inside the windchests on this organ (the incoming air being distributed to all chests at 19 inches water gauge). These are due to be repaired in the coming months.

     

    The Maida Vale Studio 1 organ has 11 ranks and is used regularly. This studio is the home of the BBC Symphony Orchestra and the organ is used when rehearsing a work that includes an organ part. An electrical short and resulting burn in the original console cable in the late 1990s caused the BBC to take the decision to have just enough electronic control gear installed (on the grounds of cost and time) to replace this cable with a data link. More recently, this new equipment has been expanded to form a complete system to replace the original relay type equipment which had become very problematic. This organ is generally in very good condition and sounds excellent. Although this organ has only 11 ranks one of these is a four rank Pedal Cornet (counted as 1 of the 11) There is no Celeste or Oboe rank mainly because the organ was designed mainly to play along with an Orchestra so it was felt that the absence of these sorts of tone wouldn't matter.

     

    John R

  3. Following my question, yes I was told it was the old St. Paul's console so we all agree on that. I'd long thought that a bit of clever filming allowed the console shots to be done at a separate location from those in the body of the church. However I now realise that because this actual console wasn't in use when the programme was made then it was probably taken to the church (without putting an organ out of action) and reconstructed to allowed this whole section to be filmed together.

     

    The odd notes played by the professor at the beginning are not real organ sounds, they're an electronic organ or synthesizer played separately so obviously any stops and keys could have been used on the console for miming purposes. The Brahms Fugue was played on a real organ but mimed to on the film. The church is at Charsfiled in Suffolk (where by coincidence there is an organ builder) and does indeed have a very small instrument on the gallery. The whole film was supposed to be very surreal so the idea of an apparantly huge console in a small parish church all helped this impression.

     

    Someone involved in this film must have had some dialogue with a significant person in the organ world to end up using the St.Paul's console. Also, parts 12 and 13 are on Youtube and the Southwell MInster organ is played live. There are also shots of the inside of Liverpool Cathedral including the bell chamber, but not the organ. I remember parts of the film when it was broadcast (and never repeated) so am pleased it's been released on DVD.

  4. This clip http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bWcTozKPJ6A is from a mammoth but very strange episode of BBCs Play For Today from 1981 called Artemis 81, which lasted 3 hours. It has already been discussed before in this topic. Can anyone tell where the console is from? It hasn't been in used for many years but a friend of mine recoginsed it. I'll give the answer in a few days. The professor in the clip gives an interesting interpretation of part of the Brahms A minor Fugue being played.

  5. Following my previous reply to a post about the 1981 BBC programme Artemis 8 1, I decided to buy this apprantly cult but never repeated programme on DVD. I've just played part of it and it is indeed the one I remember. I've amazed myself with how much detail I remembered about the first organ scene. The DVD has an optional commentry by the writer and (I think) the producer or director plus a film expert. One of the commentators actually states that the earlier organ (obviously a four manual a Willis) is that of the Great Hall of Birmingham university. We see the console and hear the organ although the film is cleverly done to make it seem as if the console is behind a red cutain under the tower in a village church. The church is somewhere near Southwold in Suffolk but has a fictional name in the film.

     

    The second location where we see and hear an organ is Southwell Minster. The detached tab console is played. One commentator on the DVD says the organist who actually performed the music and is also seen playing live at Southall in the long shots (& wearing a wig) is Peter Dickenson. The final item is a piece by Gordon Crosse based on a twelve note theme provided by the writer. The theme is a distortion of the Brahms Ab minor fugue heard on the earlier organ above.

     

    John R

     

    I've now seen more of the DVD (not all, it is three hours long!). Anyone who enjoys being slighly' freaked out' should consider Artemis.8.1 if anyone asks them what they'd like for Xmas, even if just to watch the sections featuring pipe organs. The Brahms A flat minor fugue will never take on the same meaning again! Even just thinking about that fugue over the years has often reminded me of my first viewing of this BBC programme in 1981 probably because I was just getting to know that fugue around that time. It is thanks to an earlier post on this thread (and it's availability on DVD) that I got to see this programme again.

     

    John R

  6. The TV Drama you mention may be the same one I often remember, but possibly not. I vividly remember a drama which included quite a lot of organ music and there was a huge organ console (but I think no pipes were ever seen) at the back of a fairly small church. It was utterly surreal and I'm sure the console certainly didn't belong to the church's own organ. The organist was very stereotypical and quite 'mad professor' with longish hair. Another thing I remember was the lead pattern changing in the windows. I hadn't been playing the organ long at the time, this drama was almost enough to frighten me away from the instrument!

     

     

    John R

     

    Following my post above in reply to a post about the 1981 BBC programme Artemis 8 1, I decided to buy this apprantly cult but never repeated programme on DVD. I've just played part of it and it is indeed the one I remember. I've amazed myself with how much detail I remembered about the first organ scene. The DVD has an optional commentry by the writer and (I think) the producer or director plus a film expert. One of the commentators actually states that the earlier organ (obviously a four manual a Willis) is that of the Great Hall of Birmingham university. We see the console and hear the organ although the film is cleverly done to make it seem as if the console is behind a red cutain under the tower in a village church. The church is somewhere near Southwold in Suffolk but has a fictional name in the film.

     

    The second location where we see and hear an organ is Southwell Minster. The detached tab console is played. One commentator on the DVD says the organist who actually performed the music and is also seen playing live at Southall in the long shots (& wearing a wig) is Peter Dickenson. The final item is a piece by Gordon Crosse based on a twelve note theme provided by the writer. The theme is a distortion of the Brahms Ab minor fugue heard on the earlier organ above.

     

    John R

  7. A Canterbury Tale (Although supposed to be at Canterbury actually filmed in St. Albans, as Canterbury's organ had been dismantled) - 1944

     

    I remember seeing this...I think they used the sound of St Albans organ, but the pics are of Canterbury...including those of the organ console when it was in its loft over the choir stalls pre 1948.

     

    There was a tv drama tv (perhaps BBC1)in the 70's or 80's which featured an organist. I can't remember much other than it seemed to have some doomsday senario. The organist in question would not play the Bach T and F in D minor because it had some special qualities. When he did in a recital, the place started to collapse. I don't recall the entire plot, but remember a mobile console? possibly for the final scenes. I do hope someone else remembers it as I must have been about 10 at the time!

     

    The TV Drama you mention may be the same one I often remember, but possibly not. I vividly remember a drama which included quite a lot of organ music and there was a huge organ console (but I think no pipes were ever seen) at the back of a fairly small church. It was utterly surreal and I'm sure the console certainly didn't belong to the church's own organ. The organist was very stereotypical and quite 'mad professor' with longish hair. Another thing I remember was the lead pattern changing in the windows. I hadn't been playing the organ long at the time, this drama was almost enough to frighten me away from the instrument!

     

    On a different note (excuse pun) I remember seening a Mander Denham organ with it's characteristic case on a film some time ago. I think it was a 70s comedy, possibly a Carry On but that sort of style.

     

    John R

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