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Bear in mind that it is in a fairly dark corner of a dark cathedral and the polished maple helps to lift the darkness. Once you hear the sounds it makes, the spirit needs no further lifting!

 

A

 

I too had wondered about this aspect of the design of the new console, in so far as whether there would be a lack of contrast between the stop-head inserts and the pale wood jambs (which explains the 'popular, but funereal black' stop jamb panels which were regularly utilised by H&H, Nicholson, Walker and Willis - amongst others).

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You state that the full organ was not oppressive; however, does it fill the building (i.e.: is it adequate), as far as you can judge?

I am sure David can answer that himself, but there is plenty of gravitas and the organ seems to generate an extra 1/2 to 1 second of echo compared with the old organ. It carries better down the nave and, particularly in the East end and Tower areas seems to approach the limits of comfortable volume for sustained listening....but without losing beauty or overall tonal structure.

 

I could try describing the strings of choir and swell in words but ultimately, you have to hear them for yourselves!

 

A

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I am on record as having found the old Worcester console perhaps the most comfortable I have ever played, although the Willis III at Hereford is a very close contender, and of course lament its passing. I must say that I was not sure whether I would like the new console based on the evidence of the (as always excellent) photographs. However on the basis of my brief visit to the new loft a week or so ago I would have to say how impressed I was with the quality of the workmanship, both in the very comfortable and, for the time being at least, tidy new loft, and with the console itself. I don't think the visiting organist will have any difficulty with the contrast or colours of the materials used, although the sheer size of the console may prove daunting. The layout of the (quite large) toe pistons impressed me, they looked very comfortable indeed, I think any organist that can manage to work out how to set their preferred options for the sequencer and setter will soon feel at home.

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In response to pcnd5584:

 

I heard the organ almost entirely from the organ console - I was trying to hold Adrian’s music up straight as the music desk was out at the time for adjustment! Thus it would be difficult for me to offer a judgement upon the way that the organ does or does not fill the cathedral, though Pierre’s point about its height is, I think, a telling one. What little I was able to hear of the undulating stops on Swell and Choir, together with other quiet stops suggest that the delicate effects that we all enjoy in the psalms, together with the mood setting so necessary in the Anglican repertoire will be there in abundance.

 

Don’t forget that in the fullness of time there is planned a sizeable two manual and pedal department in the Scott case in the transepts; however, it has been my understanding that the quire organ has been designed to be of maximum effect in the chancel. Doubtless you will be able to hear it well in the nave, but I’m not sure that it has been designed to permeate throughout the whole cathedral. Hence the transept organ and the west end plans.

 

Now if I’ve got that wrong I can expect a thorough ticking off from Adrian, who will then put me and the rest of us right!

 

It has to be said that each of us will have to make up our own minds about the new instrument and I, for one, will be most interested to read of members’ reactions to it as the months go by. It won’t suit everybody, I’m sure, but I am positive that for most it will be as charming as my fat black cat Archie, and unlike him on a bad day, it won’t bite you.

 

Forgive me, if you will, repeating myself - one of my many failings, but I’ll say it again: the view from the west end really is simply stunning!

 

David Harrison

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Great looking instrument: when is the grand opening? If I haven't already missed it then, one way or another, I shall get up there from Bristol.

 

Arrangements are as follows:

 

Gillian Weir will be giving an inaugural recital on Friday 8th August 2008 at 11 am as part of the Three Choirs Festival - book online at www.3choirs.org, though I believe this is now sold out.

 

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Great looking instrument: when is the grand opening? If I haven't already missed it then, one way or another, I shall get up there from Bristol.

 

Arrangements are as follows:

 

Gillian Weir will be giving an inaugural recital on Friday 8th August 2008 at 11 am as part of the Three Choirs Festival - book online at www.3choirs.org, though I believe this is now sold out.

 

Over the weekend of October 4th/5th we will be holding a formal dedication weekend as follows:

 

Saturday 4th October

 

5.30 pm - Evensong and Dedication

8.00 pm - Recital by Thomas Trotter

including Elgar - 2nd Sonata and works by Handel, Bolcom & Messiaen

Tickets £15 from Worcester Live Box Office 01905 611427

 

Sunday 5th October

 

10.30 am - Sung Eucharist

including the première of a new double organ mass by Adrian Lucas

4.00 pm - Choral Evensong

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Good afternoon, gentlemen!

 

(Apologies to any ladies present!)

 

I've just posted my final set of photos (at least for the time being) which I hope you will enjoy. Inevitably there are a few small issues which we are still sorting out at the moment, but the sound of the instrument is truly wonderful and she is very comfortable to play, I think.

 

We've had quite a few visitors now to see and hear the organ and look forward to your support over the coming months as the instrument beds in to her ongoing work of playing the daily office. You already know about the initial recitals on August 8th (Gillian Weir) and October 4th (Thomas Trotter) and I hope you will be able to come along to one or both of those.

 

We will also be recording BBC choral evensong which is to be broadcast on Sunday 10th August and I am sure there will be a lot of interest in that.

 

I will be recording a CD in September which will be available at the October launch weekend.

 

Meanwhile, may I thank you for your interest and hope to see you in Worcester in the near future.

 

Adrian

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Hi Adrian

 

Thanks for posting the photos - the organ cases look extremely successful.

 

Just a quick question: I noticed from the shots of Vox Humana the swell mixture is not in place. Where is it?

 

Good luck with it all!

 

Best wishes

 

Colin

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Just a quick question: I noticed from the shots of Vox Humana the swell mixture is not in place. Where is it?

It's gone on its Summer holiday...!!! No, seriously, it has gone back to Northampton to be opened up a little more to match in better with the swell chorus and, in particular, the reeds. While most of the voicing has been done on site, with a stop like this, it is much easier to do it on the voicing machine in the works. It is due to return, duly tanned, on Tuesday or shortly afterwards.

 

A

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Thanks for all your efforts on all our behalf - this must have been a first - 'much enjoyment watching the organ's genesis.

 

AJJ

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Good afternoon, gentlemen!

 

(Apologies to any ladies present!)

 

I've just posted my final set of photos (at least for the time being) which I hope you will enjoy. Inevitably there are a few small issues which we are still sorting out at the moment, but the sound of the instrument is truly wonderful and she is very comfortable to play, I think.

 

We've had quite a few visitors now to see and hear the organ and look forward to your support over the coming months as the instrument beds in to her ongoing work of playing the daily office. You already know about the initial recitals on August 8th (Gillian Weir) and October 4th (Thomas Trotter) and I hope you will be able to come along to one or both of those.

 

We will also be recording BBC choral evensong which is to be broadcast on Sunday 10th August and I am sure there will be a lot of interest in that.

 

I will be recording a CD in September which will be available at the October launch weekend.

 

Meanwhile, may I thank you for your interest and hope to see you in Worcester in the near future.

 

Adrian

Adrian,

As others have already said at various points during this thread, it's been extremely interesting to watch this new organ coming to life. I very much look forward to hearing it.

Very many thanks for taking the time to post here during what's been an extremely busy time for you.

With best wishes,

Paul.

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It's gone on its Summer holiday...!!! No, seriously, it has gone back to Northampton to be opened up a little more to match in better with the swell chorus and, in particular, the reeds. While most of the voicing has been done on site, with a stop like this, it is much easier to do it on the voicing machine in the works. It is due to return, duly tanned, on Tuesday or shortly afterwards.

 

A

Thanks for that. When I first saw the photos, to be honest I immediately wondered how much the divisions in the triforium boxes would need to be opened up to get the sound out, especially the higher pitched pipes, to balance the more advantageously placed Great and Pedal divisions. Knowing Ken's work, I'm sure your mixture is in the best possible hands - I've always felt he is very good at judging levels of power and I'm sure it'll come back just right - not too hard or driven (which is the danger but I know Ken won't fall into that trap) but fitting in just right with everything else. So I'm going to book a nice spa and relax about it...

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Adrian,

 

I'd just like to add my voice of thanks for your step by step accounts of the installation. It looks magnificent...and if it sounds as good as it looks...

 

I've particularly enjoyed the artistry in your photography and the care you have taken to get shots so nicely aligned. The final set are really quite special.

 

Do I take it that the Vox Humana has double-blocks in the French style (sometimes referred to as 'nut and ring') ? The long boots make it look as though it is.

 

H

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It's gone on its Summer holiday...!!! No, seriously, it has gone back to Northampton to be opened up a little more to match in better with the swell chorus and, in particular, the reeds. While most of the voicing has been done on site, with a stop like this, it is much easier to do it on the voicing machine in the works. It is due to return, duly tanned, on Tuesday or shortly afterwards.

 

A

 

I too went on my Summer holdays last week and called into Worcester Cathedral on Wednesday and was rewarded by hearing the new organ being "sampled" by Dr Roy Massey (formerly of Hereford). Sounded superbly bright but with a good bite to the pedal registers. It may not be FULLY complete yet but it is clearly an asset both aurally and visually to the cathedral ... even my wife said it looked good!

 

Await the new CD with anticipation

 

Best wishes

Redeye

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I was in Worcester over the weekend and decided to call in and my friend Keith hearnshaw was playing the Rodgers Organ for evensong. Have to say the Rodgers certainly packs some punch and filled the Nave with sound very well. Now to the new Kenneth Tickell Organs. Can't really comment yet as I haven't heard the instrument but the cases look magnificent and almost reminds me of another Westminster Abbey although the design is not quite the same. As I under stand the 32's are not available until the building of the Transpet Organ. Nobody has explain why this case is being sited on the other side of the nave. other than there are some beautiful carvings behind the Transpet Case and the Dean & Chapter want to exposed them again. This seems rather silly to me. I don't really see how this is logical. In addtion to this, removing this case is a large undertaking how on earth do they intend to remove some of Hope Jones old diaphones buried in the case and thus silent for many years ? And I gather there is talk of another Organ at the West End to be built at some stage. Or is this suppose to be a Nave division similar to what Canterbury installed some years ago ?

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I was in Worcester over the weekend and decided to call in and my friend Keith hearnshaw was playing the Rodgers Organ for evensong. Have to say the Rodgers certainly packs some punch and filled the Nave with sound very well. Now to the new Kenneth Tickell Organs. Can't really comment yet as I haven't heard the instrument but the cases look magnificent and almost reminds me of another Westminster Abbey although the design is not quite the same. As I under stand the 32's are not available until the building of the Transpet Organ. Nobody has explain why this case is being sited on the other side of the nave. other than there are some beautiful carvings behind the Transpet Case and the Dean & Chapter want to exposed them again. This seems rather silly to me. I don't really see how this is logical. In addtion to this, removing this case is a large undertaking how on earth do they intend to remove some of Hope Jones old diaphones buried in the case and thus silent for many years ? And I gather there is talk of another Organ at the West End to be built at some stage. Or is this suppose to be a Nave division similar to what Canterbury installed some years ago ?

Dear Ronald,

 

When Hill built the organ in the Transept in 1874, we believe that the case was much deeper and came further forward in the transept. The case was reduced in size when Hope-Jones turned this four-manual into a mere division of Solo and Pedal in the 1890s. This whole instrument was originally designed to go in the North Transept where it would have a more stable temperature and would be illuminated from the front by natural light coming through the windows on the South side. The funds were donated by the then Earl of Dudley who had had some sort of disagreement with the donor of the Window in the South Transept. In true charitable fashion, the new case was enlarged vertically such that it would obscure a good portion of the aforementioned window, though at the same stroke it would look less good as it would always be illuminated from behind.

 

In the present larger scheme of works, building an organ towards the West end of the Nave as well as the current instrument in the Quire would solve the problems of two major uses but would not adequately cover work with the choir in the tower area and Eastern Nave positions. In order to use the Transept case (which needed to be preserved anyway) as part of the solution, it would need to be moved forward in any case. The combination of this and the audibility situation from the new Quire console suggested that, when restored, it should return to the position in which Hill originally intended to build it. In any case, the structure within this case would have to be altered radically for the new division, so a new frame would be part of this scheme. All these factors point conclusively towards the North Transept as the correct location. There it will stand with space behind it from which to see the memorials and the North Transept window. As a bonus, more light will be able to come into our dark building through the uncluttered South Transept Window.

 

All we need now are the funds.....donations gratefully received!

 

Hope that's useful.

 

Adrian

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"All we need now are the funds.....donations gratefully received!"

(Quote)

 

Or a "garage sale" with the discarded pipework maybe ?

 

Pierre

 

And the brick swell box, perhaps?

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This might seem a wasteful end to what is probably a lot of good quality - and perfectly useable - pipework but, in consideration of the seemingly high value of metal these days, why not sell the pipes to someone who will melt the pipes down and recycle the metal? They may well also give you quite a bit of cash for the metal.

 

But leave those green painted pipes from one ofthe previous instruments: that is too valuable to loose.

 

I also wish to put on record my appreciation for the superb photographic chronicaling of the building of the new instrument. It has been truly fascinating. Thanks, Adrian! I am intending to hire a car and get up to Worcester for the Eurcharist on 5th October. I will have to hire a car as I will be coming from Bristol and will make a decently early start on the Sunday morning.

 

Dave

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Guest Roffensis
"melt the pipes"

(Quote)

 

..........

 

Pierre

 

 

 

Ah yes, of course. But, we are only now correcting the mistakes made in the 70s! One has to therefore "wait in line" for the natural progression of things. :P

 

R

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Also, the transept case could he moved forwards to make place for all the 'old' pipework, which, by good hands, could be made into a coherent ensemble.

 

 

naaahhh .....

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