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Reubke Sonata


Charles Wooler
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I'm relearning this to take it on the Edinburgh Organ Academy in Easter Week and have a query about Allegro assai section in the fugue (bar 504 ==> end), where the pedals are in triplets and the hand have the double dotted minim /quaver rhythm. Is the received wisdom to play it as written or to land the final quaver of each bar with the last triplet of each bar. Does anyone think it will make a difference either way? :unsure:

 

Charles

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I'm relearning this to take it on the Edinburgh Organ Academy in Easter Week and have a query about Allegro assai section in the fugue (bar 504 ==> end), where the pedals are in triplets and the hand have the double dotted minim /quaver rhythm. Is the received wisdom to play it as written or to land the final quaver of each bar with the last triplet of each bar. Does anyone think it will make a difference either way? :unsure:

 

Charles

I'd go for playing it as written...or more dotty in the hands, if possible. It's much more dramatic that way!!

 

Adrian Lucas

Worcester Cathedral

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I'm relearning this to take it on the Edinburgh Organ Academy in Easter Week and have a query about Allegro assai section in the fugue (bar 504 ==> end), where the pedals are in triplets and the hand have the double dotted minim /quaver rhythm. Is the received wisdom to play it as written or to land the final quaver of each bar with the last triplet of each bar. Does anyone think it will make a difference either way? :unsure:

 

Charles

 

 

==============================

 

I'm re-learning this also, for a recital in June (I think it is), and yes, I think I would agree with Adrian that it just adds a little something to play the double dots as written; not that playing them the other way actually spoils anything terribly much.

 

The more vexed question is how much variance there is in the manual triplets between one performer and the next. I always prefer the 1-2-3/1-2-3/1-2-3/1-2-3 approach, yet others have played it as 1-2-3-4-5-6/1-2-3-4-5-6, and one must assume that the pedal triplets must be similarly treated, whetever choice is made.

 

It's a long time since I played this last in public, and on a general note, it really is a work which, as the notes start to go down and flow, really rewards attention to detail like no other work I know. I find it is actually a real pleasure to meet the challenges and enjoy the experience of it getting better and better as time goes one.

 

Normally, I actually detest practising anything, but not this wonderful sonata, which I find a real pleasure.

This was the first big work I ever learned and really wanted to learn.

 

I guess I must like it!

 

MM

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I do not have the music at hand, but it seems to be the last page in the Peters edition:

I would support the version to sharpen the manual notes and not to align them to the pedal triplets. Many players misunderstand the Allegro assai and perform a show of "see how fast I can move my feet".

Even in medium acoustics the result is very muddy. The Allegro assai is related to the basic beat, it is IMO (and some other's) not intended to instate the triplets as a metrum which is even faster than all the small values before. The whole final section can combine majesty and dramatic action, if played with musical and acoustical control, in spite of testing the limits of action and winding.

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Guest Barry Williams
I do not have the music at hand, but it seems to be the last page in the Peters edition:

I would support the version to sharpen the manual notes and not to align them to the pedal triplets. Many players misunderstand the Allegro assai and perform a show of "see how fast I can move my feet".

Even in medium acoustics the result is very muddy. The Allegro assai is related to the basic beat, it is IMO (and some other's) not intended to instate the triplets as a metrum which is even faster than all the small values before. The whole final section can combine majesty and dramatic action, if played with musical and acoustical control, in spite of testing the limits of action and winding.

 

 

When preparing the Sonata for ARCM (Performers) I was emphatically told by my teacher that the examiners would listen carefully to ascertain whether these notes sounded together or not. If they were played together marks would be lost. What one does to pass an examination does not necessarily guarantee musicality, but in this case the best and indeed the most accurate interpretation is not to align the hands and feet. The triplets should not be so fast that the pedal pipes do not sound properly, or the effect will be spoiled.

 

Barry Williams

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