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Sarah Baldock is playing at St Mary the Virgin, Twyford on 6 October 2009 at 7:30pm.

(That's the Hampshire Twyford - at SO21 1NT, just off junction 11 of the M3)

 

Tickets £10/£8 concs, which includes a glass of wine and refreshments after the concert.

 

Be good to see lots of board subscribers there!

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This Friday, 2 Oct, at 7.30 pm, there is a chamber concert at Powderham Castle, near Exeter, Devon, featuring the 1769 Brice Seede organ, which was recently returned to a playable state by Michael Farley.

 

The programme features organ concertos by Stanley and Handel and a Stanley voluntary.

 

Tickets (£12) must be booked in advance as space is limited (as mentioned here).

 

This has only just been brought to my attention - I do not know how booked up it is already.

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David Briggs, Worcester Cathedral

 

Saturday 3rd October, 6.30pm

 

Dedication of Organ 1st Anniversary Recital, £15 on the door

 

Programme:

 

JS Bach, trans. Briggs 2009: Orchestra Suite No 3 in D major

(i Overture. ii Air. iii Gavotte. iv Bouree. v Gigue)

 

Dukas, trans. Briggs 1996: The Sorcerer's Apprentice

 

Elgar, trans. Briggs 2009: Symphony No 1 in A flat, Opus 55

(i Andante, Nobilmente e semplice. ii Allegro molto. iii Adagio. iv Lento - Allegro.)

 

See you all there - large-screen projection (with pedal-cam) as usual!

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David Briggs, Worcester Cathedral

 

Saturday 3rd October, 6.30pm

 

Dedication of Organ 1st Anniversary Recital, £15 on the door

 

Programme:

 

JS Bach, trans. Briggs 2009: Orchestra Suite No 3 in D major

(i Overture. ii Air. iii Gavotte. iv Bouree. v Gigue)

 

Dukas, trans. Briggs 1996: The Sorcerer's Apprentice

 

Elgar, trans. Briggs 2009: Symphony No 1 in A flat, Opus 55

(i Andante, Nobilmente e semplice. ii Allegro molto. iii Adagio. iv Lento - Allegro.)

 

See you all there - large-screen projection (with pedal-cam) as usual!

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I have always believed that the maximum that should be charged for a concert or recital, whatever you call it, is £10 with concessions , and I say this being aware of recitalists fees.

I am shocked, therefore to note that David Brigg's concert will cost you £15 and no concessions.

Is the recitalist aware that this monstrous admission fee is being charged with the aged and students paying exactly the same-? disgraceful. I certainly will not be there.

I thought there was a recession.on.

Colin Richell.

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I have always believed that the maximum that should be charged for a concert or recital, whatever you call it, is £10 with concessions , and I say this being aware of recitalists fees.

I am shocked, therefore to note that David Brigg's concert will cost you £15 and no concessions.

Is the recitalist aware that this monstrous admission fee is being charged with the aged and students paying exactly the same-? disgraceful. I certainly will not be there.

I thought there was a recession.on.

Colin Richell.

I agree entirely re concessions (if there was a good bar and comfy seats, I might concede :rolleyes: ). However, there have been generous concessions for children at recent recitals. Perhaps Chris/Adrian might confirm if this is the case?

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I have always believed that the maximum that should be charged for a concert or recital, whatever you call it, is £10 with concessions , and I say this being aware of recitalists fees.

What are the grounds for your belief, Colin? Or is it just a gut feeling? The word "always" gives the impression that £10 is right for an organ recital now, and was just as right 10, 20, 30 years ago, which does seem strange.

 

I'd have thought that ticket prices for any event are decided through a process that involves:

 

What are the costs?

What can people afford? (include possibilities of range of ticket prices and concessions)

What can we get away with? (which isn't noble but will nevertheless be present at times).

 

I can't comment on this particular case, but would point out that tickets for pop concerts, football games, and non-organ classical concerts generally start at more than £10 and rise to several times that amount.

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I have always believed that the maximum that should be charged for a concert or recital, whatever you call it, is £10 with concessions , and I say this being aware of recitalists fees.

I am shocked, therefore to note that David Brigg's concert will cost you £15 and no concessions.

Is the recitalist aware that this monstrous admission fee is being charged with the aged and students paying exactly the same-? disgraceful. I certainly will not be there.

I thought there was a recession.on.

Colin Richell.

Given that DB is one of the top players, this seems like good value to me. Compare it with the costs of travelling and a meal before or after....Why should organ recitals always be provided on the cheap?

JJK

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What are the grounds for your belief, Colin? Or is it just a gut feeling? The word "always" gives the impression that £10 is right for an organ recital now, and was just as right 10, 20, 30 years ago, which does seem strange.

 

I'd have thought that ticket prices for any event are decided through a process that involves:

 

What are the costs?

What can people afford? (include possibilities of range of ticket prices and concessions)

What can we get away with? (which isn't noble but will nevertheless be present at times).

 

I can't comment on this particular case, but would point out that tickets for pop concerts, football games, and non-organ classical concerts generally start at more than £10 and rise to several times that amount.

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I would have thought that £15 is a bit of a bargain to hear DB at Worcester. I paid £17 each for Mrs H and me to hear him at The Three Choirs in Hereford** Cathedral and it was worth every penny and more. £15 buys less than 1/5 of a tank of petrol today and one can barely get a couple of pints and a sandwich for the same amount.

 

**The seats were comfy too - I guess that they were hired-in for the occasion so the cushion in Mrs H's bag was superfluous on this occasion!

 

P

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Perhaps I should have said 5 to 7 years rather than always.

I do not dispute that David Briggs is an excellent recitalist, but who decided the cost of admission ? I hope this includes the cost of a programme.

Look at Stephen Smith's web site and you will find countless organ concerts where admission is free (retiring collection) and where I consider that the recitalist is often as competent as David Briggs.

In my days as a concert organiser the recitalist fees ranged from £300 to £1,000 so I accept that the ticket price has to reflect these outgoings, and perhaps David Briggs puts himself in the higher bracket.

I agree that West End concerts attract a much higher ticket price, but we are talking about an organ concert often in a cold building with uncomfortable seats, and not always professionally organised. Is this why organ concerts are losing popularity.?

When I have sold tickets at concerts, my experience is that certainly the older persons, or indeed the younger students expect concessions, .

I could understand it if it was a fund raising concert, and included an attractive programme, but I think this is not the case,

I note a concert on this site on 6th October in St Mary the Virgin, Twyford, with admission at £10, and concessions £8, but this includes a glass of wine and refreshments, now that is value, and should attract the punters.

I maintain that the organisers of the David Briggs concert are arrogant, but this, is. of course my own view.

Colin Richell.

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Perhaps I should have said 5 to 7 years rather than always.

I do not dispute that David Briggs is an excellent recitalist, but who decided the cost of admission ? I hope this includes the cost of a programme.

Look at Stephen Smith's web site and you will find countless organ concerts where admission is free (retiring collection) and where I consider that the recitalist is often as competent as David Briggs.

In my days as a concert organiser the recitalist fees ranged from £300 to £1,000 so I accept that the ticket price has to reflect these outgoings, and perhaps David Briggs puts himself in the higher bracket.

I agree that West End concerts attract a much higher ticket price, but we are talking about an organ concert often in a cold building with uncomfortable seats, and not always professionally organised. Is this why organ concerts are losing popularity.?

When I have sold tickets at concerts, my experience is that certainly the older persons, or indeed the younger students expect concessions, .

I could understand it if it was a fund raising concert, and included an attractive programme, but I think this is not the case,

I note a concert on this site on 6th October in St Mary the Virgin, Twyford, with admission at £10, and concessions £8, but this includes a glass of wine and refreshments, now that is value, and should attract the punters.

I maintain that the organisers of the David Briggs concert are arrogant, but this, is. of course my own view.

Colin Richell.

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But maybe in Tottenham he can expect a larger audience than Worcester can? Maybe the hidden costs of opening up St Benet's for the evening are less than Worcester's? Perhaps DL's fee for this isn't so high as DB's for Worcester? I don't know. Just some thoughts. But I know for a fact that there are organists out there who are willing to take a pragmatic view about fees and - to an extent - suit them to what a venue can afford. We shouldn't assume an even playing field.

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I'm also sure that Worcester Cathedral itself, and thereby the music including the planned new Chancel organ, will benefit from the admission charge. Whatever, I still regard £15 as an insignificant amount.

 

Perhaps Adrian or Chris will give us approximate attendance numbers after the recital...

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Whatever, I still regard £15 as an insignificant amount.

I'm sorry but for a family of four, it is not insignificant! I don't quibble about the cost for an adult - when you can't reserve a seat, for an artist of DJB's callibre, a blanket £15 is fine, but one can't be expected to encourage young people to experience such an event without concessions. If there are concessions, then they should be shouted from the rooftops, in my view.

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It does seem at face-value to be rather a large amount - certainly if one is to encourage youngsters to hear the organ. However we don't know the circumstances as it is quite probable that David might be giving his services, or donating all the PRS proceeds (all the music is of his arrangements - no organ music literature at all - and are out of original composer copyright and thus will bring in a not inconsiderable sum either to himself or the cathedral if the monies are being donated.) As I say (and think), we are not privy to the background to all this and also how much the coffers might still need to be filled to pay for the organ or the second one. I am more than sure that the cathedral will be greatly indebted to David for being so magnanimous should my hunch be correct.

Best wishes,

Nigel

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Perhaps Adrian or Chris will give us approximate attendance numbers after the recital...

Well perhaps, but there's no reason why they should need to justify their actions to us.

 

I'm sorry but for a family of four, it is not insignificant! I don't quibble about the cost for an adult - when you can't reserve a seat, for an artist of DJB's callibre, a blanket £15 is fine, but one can't be expected to encourage young people to experience such an event without concessions. If there are concessions, then they should be shouted from the rooftops, in my view.

As a general principle I do agree with this. I am tempted to suggest (wholly tongue-in-cheek) that offering a concession to senior people may be impractical because 95% of any audience will qualify, but the young definitely ought to be encouraged. I would even suggest (wholly seriously) that, at most organ recitals in the UK, seats could be offered entirely free to those aged, say, 18 or less without reducing the take significantly, if at all. Or is my impression too pessimistic? I hope so...

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We haven't held organ concerts at Worcester for many many years, and so various aspects of this first series have been, to a degree, an experiment. We set the main ticket prices after a good deal of spade work looking at what was around both in our local cathedrals and Birmingham, and we're basically happy with how the budgeting has worked. We didn't advertise concessions (though that's one of the things we'll be discussing before publicizing next year's concerts) but its worth saying (as Ian suggested) that we've allowed a fair degree of discretionary concessions on the door when admitting children and/or families. Speaking purely personally, rarely with organ recitals (and indeed any concert) does the combination of performer, repertoire and venue make me jump with excitement. But when it does, I don't object to paying for the experience.

 

Encouraging interest in the organ amongst all ages, and making our instrument readily accessible is part of our regular work in the music department. I look forward to welcoming Colin here at some point (assuming he hasn't been already) perhaps to one of the many free opportunities to hear the instrument before, during and after daily services or to one of our forthcoming series of lunchtime recitals soon to be announced, or to one of the many visits made by organ clubs and societies as well as individuals to play the instrument. We're only a phone-call or email away.

 

Hope that provides a bit of helpful background,

 

Best wishes on a grey Wednesday,

 

Christopher

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I have always believed that the maximum that should be charged for a concert or recital, whatever you call it, is £10 with concessions , and I say this being aware of recitalists fees.

I am shocked, therefore to note that David Brigg's concert will cost you £15 and no concessions.

Is the recitalist aware that this monstrous admission fee is being charged with the aged and students paying exactly the same-? disgraceful. I certainly will not be there.

I thought there was a recession.on.

Colin Richell.

 

 

Hmm I agree with you in parts. I don't think there is a maximum charge for concerts, you only have to go on the Internet and look around at major pop and classical venues and you will find £15 is not as much. I do agree that there should be some concessions if it is to attract the student generation. In fact I think that should apply to other organisations in the organ world, not just organ concerts but also in organbuilding groups, but that’s a different matter. If I was still a student then I wouldn't attend it, because I wouldn't be able to afford if I hadn't saved. Oh but having said that this concert is in October isn't it - most student loans would have gone in by now anyway, so good thinking on the Cathedral is they had thought of that! Joking aside there is not very much difference in £10-£15. Are you saying you can't afford £5? I don't think David would be as interested in how much the cathedral charge provided he gets his fee, which would have influenced the final cost per ticket in any case. Please also don't forget that the Cathedral has a new Organ to pay for as well! I don't think they have been arrogant (I think you might have mentioned that in another post - can't remember), because they would not have invited us forum members to have a FREE go on the organ back in February of this year.

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Many thanks Chris for your helpful response. I can certainly testify to the welcoming, inclusive and 'missionary' attitude of Worcester Cathedral's music department, and for the frequent opportunities given to all ages to play and hear the wonderful new organ. It's good to know kids concessions are still very much in mind for the 'big' recital series. Looking forward to seeing you on Saturday!

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We haven't held organ concerts at Worcester for many many years, and so various aspects of this first series have been, to a degree, an experiment. We set the main ticket prices after a good deal of spade work looking at what was around both in our local cathedrals and Birmingham, and we're basically happy with how the budgeting has worked. We didn't advertise concessions (though that's one of the things we'll be discussing before publicizing next year's concerts) but its worth saying (as Ian suggested) that we've allowed a fair degree of discretionary concessions on the door when admitting children and/or families. Speaking purely personally, rarely with organ recitals (and indeed any concert) does the combination of performer, repertoire and venue make me jump with excitement. But when it does, I don't object to paying for the experience.

 

Encouraging interest in the organ amongst all ages, and making our instrument readily accessible is part of our regular work in the music department. I look forward to welcoming Colin here at some point (assuming he hasn't been already) perhaps to one of the many free opportunities to hear the instrument before, during and after daily services or to one of our forthcoming series of lunchtime recitals soon to be announced, or to one of the many visits made by organ clubs and societies as well as individuals to play the instrument. We're only a phone-call or email away.

 

Hope that provides a bit of helpful background,

 

Best wishes on a grey Wednesday,

 

Christopher

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