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21 hours ago, carrick said:

"Regulator" is a common word in theatre organ terminology for bellows. Yes, you can just turn off the tremulants (and the Tibias). 

Many thanks.

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I remember hearing Paul Hale play a recital at Walsall Town Hall on the excellent Nicholson and Lord/Compton/Mander/Hawkins organ. He ended with an arrangement by a theatre organist friend of the Widor V final movement interspersed with "When the Saints Go Marching In" theme largely in the pedal. He ussed the wobulation devices (😊) and I recall thinking at the time that is was a shame that there wasn't one on the pedal organ as the 32' reed in particular would have been fun had there been.

 

 

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St Michael and All Angels Bedford Park, London, W4

Friday 7th June  12.30pm

(next to Turnham Green tube)

Oxbridge Organ Duo (Julian Collings and Benedict Lewis Smith) http://www.oxbridgeorganduo.com

David Briggs (b. 1962) Variations on ‘Veni Creator Spiritus’
 
Theme - Intermezzo - Assez Lent -  Tres Lent - Fanfare sur les Jeux d'Anches - Scherzo - Ricercare - Duo pour Pedalier -  Final
 
Thomas Tomkins (1572-1656) - Fancy for two to play
 
Ad Wammes (b. 1953)
Wave
- Gentle breeze - Row the boat - A sunny afternoon on the lake - Breeze in gently 
 
Nicolas Carleton (c.1570-1630) - A Verse
 
Samuel Sebastian Wesley (1810-1876)

Duet for Organ in C Major 

- Allegro - Andante  - Fuga. Alla Capella 

Free admission

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1 hour ago, Jonathan Dods said:
Samuel Sebastian Wesley (1810-1876)

Duet for Organ in C Major 

- Allegro - Andante  - Fuga. Alla Capella 

Free admission

Jonathan

The Duet is by Samuel Wesley (son of Charles the hymn writer, brother of Charles the organist, and father of Samuel Sebastian).

The BACH motif lurks here and there in the Fuga, which - unless someone knows better - is surely a first in English organ music.

Ian

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I am unsure if it has been posted here already but the website of Worcester Cathedral advertises on the concerts page that this year the anniversary organ recital (the 11th) will be given on 05th October by Thomas Trotter who, IIRC, gave the opening concert. 6:45pm start: no clues as to the music at present on Worcester's website.

http://worcestercathedral.co.uk/index.php?pr=Concerts

Dave

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The next recital at St Michael and All Angels Bedford Park is a week later to coincide with the Chiswick Book Festival (usually first Friday of the month)

Friday 13th September 12.30. Admission free, retiring collection

St Michael and All Angels Church London W4 1TT (next to Turnham Green tube)

James Johnstone (Guildhall and Trinity Laban), performing music which he has recently recorded and which received a Diapason d'Or

François Couperin (1668-1733)

Gloria from Messe Solonelle à l’usage des Paroisses

Plein jeu | Et in Terra pax.

Petitte fugue Sur le Chromhorne | 2e. Couplet du Gloria

Duo sur les Tierces| 3e.Couplet

Dialogues sur les Trompettes Clairon et Tierces du G.C. Et le bourdon avec le larigot du positif. | 4e. Couplet

3° a 2 Dessus de Chromhorne Et la basse de Tierce | 5e. Couplet

Tierce en Taille 6e. Couplet

Dialogue sur la Voix humaine | 7e.Couplet

Dialogue en 3. Du Cornet et de la tierce | 8e.Couplet

Dialogue Sur les Grands Jeux 9e.et dernier Couplet

Johann Sebastian Bach (1685-1750)

Allein Gott in der Höh sei Ehr BWV 662

Partita sopra Ach, was soll ich Sünder machen BWV 770

Dietrich Buxtehude (1637-1707) Toccata in d minor, BuxWV 155

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Opening recital of the 2019-20 season at Leeds Town Hall on Monday at 1.05pm.  Mendelssohn 1st sonata, a Percy Grainger arrangement for piano and organ, and finishing with Lemare Variations on Hanover, preceded by two of his summer sketches.  And the D minor Toccata & Fugue to start the whole thing off.   The full season listing attached.

Please come along and/or spread the word - we always get a good audience, but the more the better!

lth1920.pdf

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I'm afraid your list isn't available.

When I lived in Bradford, I used to come to the lunchtime recitals every, or at least most weeks.  "The largest three manual organ in the world", they used to say!

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That's strange - it was OK for a couple of hours then disappeared.  Anyway here's a link to the same document which will hopefully be more durable:

 

http://www.organrecitals.com/1/2003leeds.pdf

I'm not sure about in the world, but I'd heard it was the largest 3-manual in Europe.  Not sure that's anything to boast about though! - 81 stops is too many to manage on three manuals really.  But  we hope it won't be for much longer....

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I have heard that claim before, from multiple sources.

It irritates me because it is, by whatever measure is chosen, plainly wrong.

http://die-orgelsite.de/

The number of three manual organs, in Europe, which have a greater number of ranks, stretches well into double figures.

There even exists one three manual organ which, by the same measure, is over 40% larger.

 

 

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That's an interesting site - thanks.  Though it does list the Leeds organ incorrectly as having 73 stops instead of 81.  Even if you exclude the pedal borrowings it's still 78.  But it still strikes me as odd that anyone would think that cramming a large number of stops onto three manuals is a good thing!

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For some reason I cannot access the German orgelsite!  I don’t think we need to get over-excited about organ statistics - one finds exaggerated claims about numbers of pipes and numbers of ranks, the latter, I think, due to not knowing the extent of mixture compositions and any borrowing.  Anyway, as a Southerner who goes to Leeds Town Hall when I can, it certainly is a fine organ, and I’m very intrigued by DariusB saying a propos 81 stops on three manuals “we hope it won’t be for much longer ...”

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Hopefully we'll be able to say something more definite in the next few weeks - watch this space!  Re the German website, I think there's a missing www after the // - that seemed to do the trick.

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13 hours ago, Rowland Wateridge said:

I’m very intrigued by DariusB saying a propos 81 stops on three manuals “we hope it won’t be for much longer ...”

Me too.  Perhaps Darius might enlighten us as to whether existing stops are to be relocated in a new division, or (even better) a completely new division might be included.  Just a personal little foible and I know it's not to everyone's taste, but I'd have included a Vox Humana as well.

15 hours ago, DariusB said:

That's an interesting site - thanks.  Though it does list the Leeds organ incorrectly as having 73 stops instead of 81.  Even if you exclude the pedal borrowings it's still 78.  But it still strikes me as odd that anyone would think that cramming a large number of stops onto three manuals is a good thing!

Yes.  There is another inaccuracy on that site, or at least on the version I have ( I once bought a CD from him).  It lists both Octave Twelfth 2 2/3 and Flute Nazard 2 2/3 on the Swell!  I'm sure that isn't the case.

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Looking forward to Nicholas Wearne's recital this Friday 12.30 at St Michael and All Angels Bedford Park:

Johann Sebastian Bach (1685 – 1750): Toccata in C (BWV 564)

Charles Villiers Stanford (1852 – 1924): Fantasia and Toccata (Op. 57)

Frank Bridge (1879 – 1941): Adagio in E (from Three Pieces for Organ, H. 63)

J. S. Bach, arr. Marcel Dupré: Sinfonia (Cantata BWV 29, Wir danken dir, Gott, wir danken dir)

Nicholas Wearne is a prize-winning organ recitalist who has performed in venues which include Suntory Hall, Tokyo; St Thomas Church, Fifth Avenue, New York; and at Cathedrals in Berlin, Canterbury and Washington. He combines his playing career with the posts of Organ Tutor and Junior Fellow at the Royal Birmingham Conservatoire, where he enjoys working with very inspiring pupils and colleagues.

Nicholas grew up in the Tamar Valley, where his first organ teacher was Gabrielle Lewis. Following an organ scholarship at Truro Cathedral, he became Organ Scholar – and later Assistant Organist – at New College, Oxford, and Organist at the University Church. This was followed by positions at St Mary's Cathedral, Edinburgh, and St Martin-in-the-Fields, London. Whilst at Oxford he took BA (hons) in Music and MPhil in Musicology and Performance.

Winner of the Poul Ruders Prize at the 2011 Odense International Organ Competition, he was invited to record his performance, and the subsequent release received an ‘Outstanding’ recommendation in International Record Review and an ‘Editor’s Choice’ in Gramophone. Nicholas has been involved in many other critically-acclaimed recording projects as soloist, accompanist or continuo artist, and has recorded and given the first performances of several contemporary works.

In addition to his work as a soloist, Nicholas is an experienced accompanist and continuo player who has performed with the Academy of Ancient Music, the European Union Baroque Orchestra and the Dunedin Consort in venues which include the Barbican and the Concertgebouw. He has worked extensively in Asia, Canada, Europe and the US, and broadcast live on BBC radio and television, as well as on other networks.

A sought-after educator, before working at the Royal Birmingham Conservatoire, Nicholas taught at New College, Oxford, at Trinity Laban, and at schools in Edinburgh and London. He is frequently invited to tutor on specialist courses by such organisations as the Edinburgh Organ Academy, the St Andrews University Summer Organ School, the Royal College of Organists, and for Oundle for Organists.

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David Poulter (formerly DOM at Chester, Coventry and Liverpool Cathedrals) is giving a recital in St Mary's Saffron Walden on Saturday (5th) at 19:30. Free admission with retiring collection.

He will be playing works by Cook, Bach, Whitlock, Elgar, Saint-Saëns, Reger, Rawsthorne and Cochereau.

 

Best wishes

 

Peter

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