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York Minster Summer Organ Recitals 2007


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Thought I would post this summer's recital details. Each recital is on a Saturday at 7:00pm lasting c. 1 hour. Repertoire will include Elgar's Organ Sonatas & Vesper Voluntaries, Howells, Buxtehude, Bach, Langlais, Jackson and Mendelssohn to name but a few. You keep you posted with the details when I know more.

 

Saturday 28 July—Wenzel Hübner, Amorbach Abbey, Germany

 

Saturday 4 August—Colin Andrews and Janette Fishell, Florida, USA

 

Saturday 11 August—Francis Jackson, Organist Emeritus, York Minster

 

Saturday 18 August—Gordon Stewart, USA

 

Saturday 25 August—Richard McVeigh, Organ Scholar, York Minster

 

Saturday 1 September—James Lancelot, Durham Cathedral

 

Saturday 8 September—John Scott Whiteley, Organist, York Minster

 

Satruday 15 September—Philip Moore, Master of the Music, York Minster

 

Tickets cost £7 (concessions £5) and will be available at the door on the night.

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Thought I would post this summer's recital details. Each recital is on a Saturday at 7:30pm lasting c. 1 hour. Repertoire will include Elgar's Organ Sonatas & Vesper Voluntaries, Howells, Buxtehude, Bach, Langlais, Jackson and Mendelssohn to name but a few. You keep you posted with the details when I know more.

Saturday 28 July—Wenzel Hübner, Amorbach Abbey, Germany

 

Saturday 4 August—Colin Andrews and Janette Fishell, Florida, USA

 

Saturday 11 August—Francis Jackson, Organist Emeritus, York Minster

 

Saturday 18 August—Gordon Stewart, USA

 

Saturday 25 August—Richard McVeigh, Organ Scholar, York Minster

 

Saturday 1 September—James Lancelot, Durham Cathedral

 

Saturday 8 September—John Scott Whiteley, Organist, York Minster

 

Satruday 15 September—Philip Moore, Master of the Music, York Minster

 

Incredible that Francis Jackson is till giving recitals in his 90th year.

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Incredible that Francis Jackson is till giving recitals in his 90th year.

 

I know he is playing Bach's Prelude and Fugue in B minor and Franck's Chorale No. 3 (which I am playing tomorrow as the voluntary incidently), can't remember what else he said now - it was very much a "Oh I think I'll play the B minor of Bach and Franck number 3"

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I know he is playing Bach's Prelude and Fugue in B minor and Franck's Chorale No. 3 (which I am playing tomorrow as the voluntary incidently), can't remember what else he said now - it was very much a "Oh I think I'll play the B minor of Bach and Franck number 3"

 

 

Slightly off topic, Richard, but does the Minster Organ have a cymblestern? I am sure that I heard JSW use it during Mathias's Jesus College service.

 

What are you doing next year?

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Slightly off topic, Richard, but does the Minster Organ have a cymblestern? I am sure that I heard JSW use it during Mathias's Jesus College service.

 

What are you doing next year?

 

No it doesn't. Although I do remember something about it being mentioned in one of our meetings - what exactly I cannot remember!? I'll ask John in a bit.

 

As for next year... I'll still be here - its decision time after that I think.

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  • 2 months later...

Here are the programme details:

 

28th July - Wenzel Hübner

 

Prelude & fugue in E flat major (BWV 552, 'St. Anne') J.S. Bach

Jesus bleibet meine Frude (BWV 147, Jesu, joy of man's desiring) J.S. Bach

Vor deine Thron tret ich hiermit (BWV 668) J.S. Bach

Sonata No. 8 G.J. Rheinberger

Elevazione Felice Moretti

Pière en fa Jacques-Nicolas Lemmens

March in A Major Frederick Scotson Clark

Le Cygne (The Swan) Camille Saint-Saëns

Crand Choeur Triomphale Alexandre Guilmant

 

4th August - Colin Andrews & Janette Fishell

 

Duet

Mars, the bringer of war (From The Planets) Gustav Holst

Janette Fishell

Impromptu Louis Vierne

Carillon de Westminster Louis Vierne

Prélude et danse fuguée Gaston Litaize

Duet

Chant des étoiles Frank Ferko

Colin Andrews

Variations de concert Joseph Bonnet

La Vierge et l'enfant Olivier Messiaen

Dieu parmi nous Olivier Messiaen

Duet

Bacchanale (From Samzon et Dalila) Camille Saint-Saëns

 

11th August - Francis Jackson

 

Prelue & fugue in B Minor (BWV 544, 'The Great') J.S. Bach

Andante in F Henry Smart

Toccata, chorale and fugue Francis Jackons

Nocturne in D flat Edward Bairstow

Choral No. 3 César Franck

 

18th August - Gordon Stewart

 

Concert Overture in C minor Alfred Hollins

Schmücke dich, O liebe Seele (BWV 654, From the 'Eighteen Chorales') J.S. Bach

Prelude & fugue in G Major (BWV 541, 'The Great') J.S. Bach

Variations in B Minor Oreste Ravanello

Berceuse Edmin Lemare

Scherzo fugue Edmin Lemare

Roulade Seth Bingham

Allegro (from Symphonie VI) Charles-Marie Widor

 

25th August - Richard McVeigh

 

Introduction and Passacaglia in D Minor Max Reger

Sonata No. 3 in A Major Francis Jackson

Prelude & fugue in G Major Felix Mendelssohn

Vesper Voluntaries Edward Elgar

La Cinquième trompette Jean Langlais

 

1st September - James Lancelot

 

Fantasia super: Komm, Heiliger Geist (BWV 651) J.S. Bach

Die Kunst der Fuge (BWV 1080, Contrapunctus I, II, XIII & XI) J.S. Bach

Valet will ich dir geben (BWV 736) J.S. Bach

Fantasia of four parts Orlando Gibbons

Fugue in A flat minor Johannes Brahms

Sonata No. 7 G.J. Rheinberger

Harmonies du Soir Sigfrid Karg-Elert

Lied des Leiermannes Petr Eben

Dankpsalm Max Reger

 

8th September - John Scott Whiteley

 

Toccata and fugue in D Minor (BWV 538, 'The Dorian') J.S. Bach

Sonata in G Edward Elgar

Chant héroïque Jean Langlais

Variations on 'While shepherds watched' Charles Wood

Final (from Symphonie III) Louis Vierne

 

15th September - Philip Moore

 

The Severn Suite (Sonata No. 2) Edward Elgar

Praeludium in C Major (BuxWV 137) Dieterich Buxtehude

Suite brève Jean Langlais

Voluntary in D William Boyce

Carillon-Sortie Henry Mulet

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Thank you Richard.

 

I have just talked 'She Who Must Be Obeyed' into going to tomorrow's recital.

 

I would really like to see 'The Grand Old Man' (FJ), but we are going on holiday to Ireland the next day.

 

I'll also try to talk her into coming to see your good self as well, but that may be pushing it a bit!

 

John

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Here are the programme details:

 

 

25th August - Richard McVeigh

 

Introduction and Passacaglia in D Minor Max Reger

Sonata No. 3 in A Major Francis Jackson

Prelude & fugue in G Major Felix Mendelssohn

Vesper Voluntaries Edward Elgar

La Cinquième trompette Jean Langlais

 

=================================

 

 

Now judging by that splendid performance of the Reger from Beverley Minster, which Richard recorded, I think it would be worth trotting along just to hear that.....and it happens to be my birthday on that day! Mmmmmmm!

 

MM

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Thank you Richard.

 

I have just talked 'She Who Must Be Obeyed' into going to tomorrow's recital.

 

I would really like to see 'The Grand Old Man' (FJ), but we are going on holiday to Ireland the next day.

 

I'll also try to talk her into coming to see your good self as well, but that may be pushing it a bit!

 

John

 

Sorry you can't make FJ's recital, its a landmark year for him this year as he turns 90 in October. If you can make it to mine then great, if not - you won't miss out on much I'm sure. Might see you tonight then!

 

Now judging by that splendid performance of the Reger from Beverley Minster, which Richard recorded, I think it would be worth trotting along just to hear that.....and it happens to be my birthday on that day! Mmmmmmm!

 

MM

 

Gosh, thank you very much! I'd forgotten about that recording! Was only of a humble age of 20 when I made that I think. The Langlais is a very exciting piece which I don't think many people will know. Its nothing like anything else he wrote, infact it sounds like Messiaen.

 

I've only just noticed that all the 'home team' are all playing 5 pieces - random coincidence!

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Sorry you can't make FJ's recital, its a landmark year for him this year as he turns 90 in October. If you can make it to mine then great, if not - you won't miss out on much I'm sure. Might see you tonight then!

Gosh, thank you very much! I'd forgotten about that recording! Was only of a humble age of 20 when I made that I think. The Langlais is a very exciting piece which I don't think many people will know. Its nothing like anything else he wrote, infact it sounds like Messiaen.

 

I've only just noticed that all the 'home team' are all playing 5 pieces - random coincidence!

 

 

Interesting Wood piece in JSW's recital. Never come across it before. Can't imagine that CW would be very adventurous in hs writing for organ.

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Gosh, thank you very much! I'd forgotten about that recording! Was only of a humble age of 20 when I made that I think. The Langlais is a very exciting piece which I don't think many people will know. Its nothing like anything else he wrote, infact it sounds like Messiaen.

 

 

==================================

 

 

You needn't thank me for that, because certain musicians just seem to have a natural affinity with certain pieces or styles of music, and I think that the Reger you recorded was as good as I've heard anywhere.

 

I remember being bowled over by a recorded performance of the Bach CP (I forget the German title.....the Passion Chorale one), from an American lad of just 14, who quite simply matched the best in the world with his musicianshipm and depth of understanding.

 

Conversely, I have a recording of Marsha Heather-Long from St.John the Divine, with possibly the best Jongen Toccata and Dupre "Noel" variations I've ever heard on disc; yet the same T & F of Reger as that which Richard played so well, which is included in the programme, is one of the most pedestrian performances I've ever heard!

 

I'm sure there is a lesson for us all there.

 

Sadly, I can't get to York this evening, which is a great shame when it is such a special year for the "Doctor".

 

MM

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The Langlais is a very nice piece Richard, and you're quite right sadly, one that isn't tremendously well known. John Scott recorded it on a disc which also included what must be a world record 27 1/2 minute (i think) ad nos, guilmant march on a theme of handel and something else. Needless to say the quality was stunning, after all, it is Mr. Scott :)

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Sorry you can't make FJ's recital, its a landmark year for him this year as he turns 90 in October. If you can make it to mine then great, if not - you won't miss out on much I'm sure. Might see you tonight then!

 

I'm sure you are being over-modest, Richard.

 

We enjoyed tonight's recital, and I'm grateful for your bringing it to my attention.

 

Just as a matter of interest, we sat in the row in front of the canons' stalls on the decani side, behind the Crown Prince of Burma (!) and the recitalist's wife. Once ensconced, we could not help but notice a small box immeditately in front of us and, being of a naturally inquisitive nature, I found it to be unlocked and proceeded to open it. Within, I found a two octave keyboard and soon realised that this was a small harmonium of sorts. I was tempted to join in the recital, but decided not to on two counts: (i) it looked as if it was about to fall apart, and (ii) I can't play!

 

Did you know about this? Presumably its function would have been to provide a pitch note for unaccompanied choral services.

 

John

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I'm sure you are being over-modest, Richard.

 

We enjoyed tonight's recital, and I'm grateful for your bringing it to my attention.

 

Just as a matter of interest, we sat in the row in front of the canons' stalls on the decani side, behind the Crown Prince of Burma (!) and the recitalist's wife. Once ensconced, we could not help but notice a small box immeditately in front of us and, being of a naturally inquisitive nature, I found it to be unlocked and proceeded to open it. Within, I found a two octave keyboard and soon realised that this was a small harmonium of sorts. I was tempted to join in the recital, but decided not to on two counts: (i) it looked as if it was about to fall apart, and (ii) I can't play!

 

Did you know about this? Presumably its function would have been to provide a pitch note for unaccompanied choral services.

 

John

 

I can't think what that would be actually, I can visualise where you were sitting and there shouldn't be anything like that there. I'll go in later and have a look. If its still there I'll hand it into the Minster Police, after I have had a good nosey at it!

 

I didn't make it in last night - the girlfriend's parents came up so we enjoyed a nice night out. Was a shame to miss the opening recital though. How did the organ sound? Last week I spent an entire evening going through every stop and every note then writing in the organ tuner's book any problems; I covered three whole pages!! I don't know if Geoffry has been in yet though. There is also a problem with some(!) of our bellows, they leak air therefore the wind pressure is not tip top which does lead to a rather anticlimax when using some of the louder stops, the effect sounds rather French as the whole pitch of the organ suddenly drops.

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I can't think what that would be actually, I can visualise where you were sitting and there shouldn't be anything like that there. I'll go in later and have a look. If its still there I'll hand it into the Minster Police, after I have had a good nosey at it!

 

I didn't make it in last night - the girlfriend's parents came up so we enjoyed a nice night out. Was a shame to miss the opening recital though. How did the organ sound? Last week I spent an entire evening going through every stop and every note then writing in the organ tuner's book any problems; I covered three whole pages!! I don't know if Geoffry has been in yet though. There is also a problem with some(!) of our bellows, they leak air therefore the wind pressure is not tip top which does lead to a rather anticlimax when using some of the louder stops, the effect sounds rather French as the whole pitch of the organ suddenly drops.

 

No, I thought I couldn't see you, going by your photographs on this forum. Your presence would have augmented the audience to 101! I always feel a little embarrassed when foreign organists perform in this country, as they must be accustomed to having larger audiences back home.

 

How strange! You will most certainly find it where I described, unless someone has nicked it in the meantime. It does look as if it has been there since the stalls were re-made. If the Minster police arrest it, could I have it - finders keepers! No, really, if it made an appearance in my house it would provide serious grounds for divorce.

 

The organ sounded fine, as far as I could tell. As the last couple of pieces were French, this probably enhanced the appropriateness of the sound!

 

John

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There is also a problem with some(!) of our bellows, they leak air therefore the wind pressure is not tip top which does lead to a rather anticlimax when using some of the louder stops, the effect sounds rather French as the whole pitch of the organ suddenly drops.

 

Interesting ... the Halifax Harrison is suffering from a similar fault at the moment. It only affects the Great flues, and it strikes even when playing with only 3 or 4 stops drawn. I seem to be particularly adept at making it happen: Alex Woodrow gave a recital yesterday without it happening, and it survived the morning service today. But it was bloody aweful last night and this afternoon when I played it. Perhaps it objects to my repertoire.

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  • 2 weeks later...
I'm sure you are being over-modest, Richard.

 

We enjoyed tonight's recital, and I'm grateful for your bringing it to my attention.

 

Just as a matter of interest, we sat in the row in front of the canons' stalls on the decani side, behind the Crown Prince of Burma (!) and the recitalist's wife. Once ensconced, we could not help but notice a small box immeditately in front of us and, being of a naturally inquisitive nature, I found it to be unlocked and proceeded to open it. Within, I found a two octave keyboard and soon realised that this was a small harmonium of sorts. I was tempted to join in the recital, but decided not to on two counts: (i) it looked as if it was about to fall apart, and (ii) I can't play!

 

Did you know about this? Presumably its function would have been to provide a pitch note for unaccompanied choral services.

 

John

 

Just been in the Minster to hear FAJ practicing as I am going to be away for his recital tomorrow. Its amazing that he is only a month off 90 and he still plays the way he does.

 

I saw that small harmonium, I have never noticed it before, it looks ancient! I tried to get a sound out of it (at the risk of interupting Francis) but either it is no longer in working order or I am totally incompetent... probably the latter! I wonder why it is still there and not somewhere safe?! Thats typical of York - ancient artifacts just lying around. I have infront of me a copy of Mozart's 'Day of anger' (Dies Irae) and marked in red crayon at the top of the first page is "First time Dec 23. 1911 TT Noble". This is from a bound collection of albums in the minster music library. Earlier in the ablum is Gray's 'What are these that glow from afar', this time the copy is annotated in purple crayon by Bairstow. One always feels a sense of history in and around the Minster.

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Perhaps it could be restored. I know of a chap in Saltaire who is into that sort of thing.

 

I remember seeing a makers plaque on the instrument, but cannot remember who this was.

 

Perhaps it is of some historical value.

 

John

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"There is also a problem with some(!) of our bellows, they leak air therefore the wind pressure is not tip top which does lead to a rather anticlimax when using some of the louder stops, the effect sounds rather French as the whole pitch of the organ suddenly drops."

 

Having attended several of this years recitals and experienced audibly the drop in wind pressure on some of the organ stops, I understand from the minster organ builder, ( & in fairness to Mr Coffin - who continues to produce work of the highest quality) that the problem Richard mentions relates to the c.1930 Harrison High Pressure "Bellows" which were assessed as not requiring re-leathering when the Minster Organ was rebuilt in 1992/3.

 

Dr. Jackson's annual recital was attended by large numbers yesterday evening, when we heard Bach BWV 544 played at a majesterial spacious tempo, enjoyed a kaleidoscope of colour during the Smart Andante and Franck Choral - (at the conclusion with the 16' contra Tuba + sub octave coupled up on the manuals! ) My favourite work, which received a magnificent performance was his own Tocc. Chrale & Fugue with its beautifully spacious middle movement - an oasis of repose- after the excitement of the Toccata and then its stalking Fugue subject with a thrilling build-up as all the other themes tumble over one another - Marvellous! : :huh:

 

Best Wishes

 

Philip Lowe

 

Rochdale,

Greater Manchester

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