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Robert Coates "llanfair" Prelude


Peter Clark
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Does anybody know this piece? It's a calypso-type treatment of the geat Ascension hymn which I'll be playing tomorrow as the outgoing voluntary.

 

Oh, talking of tomorrow (Ascension in the RC church now, by the way) At the Name of Jesus - which tune?!! :D

 

Peter

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Guest Patrick Coleman
Does anybody know this piece? It's a calypso-type treatment of the geat Ascension hymn which I'll be playing tomorrow as the outgoing voluntary.

 

Oh, talking of tomorrow (Ascension in the RC church now, by the way) At the Name of Jesus - which tune?!! :lol:

 

Peter

 

Undoubtedly Camberwell with fanfares &c

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Guest Barry Williams

W H Ferguson's 'Cuddeson' carries Caroline Noel's poem better than any other tune. It matches the enjambments that characterise four of the verses. Also, it places the name of Jesus on the high and long notes in the first and last verses, thus providing the correct emphasis in a most musical way.

 

Camberwell has a perfect cadence at the most inappropriate moment for these words. Despite being a good tune, it is a very bad tune for this hymn, for it tends to destroy the sense.

 

Barry Williams

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Unfortunately it is Camberwell by popular demind! As you say, Barry, it is a ood tune though he interlude is a little vulgar (a bit Blackpool Tower! :lol: ) for me. Where do the fanfares go, Patroick?

 

BTW I was chastised by a fellow organist yesterday for not playing BWV 630 after today's Mass but I pointed out two things: that I had played it every year (Sunday after Ascension) for the last 10 and also that Herr Triumpheret (however spelt), so say some, is more properly an Easter prelude. Hmm....

 

Peter

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also that Herr Triumpheret (however spelt), so say some, is more properly an Easter prelude.
According to a footnote in vol. 20 of the Novello edition, it is an Easter hymn (is this merely a reference to the words?) but it was specifically appointed for the Ascension and its position in the Orgelbüchlein makes it clear that that is how Bach saw it.
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Guest Patrick Coleman
Unfortunately it is Camberwell by popular demind! As you say, Barry, it is a ood tune though he interlude is a little vulgar (a bit Blackpool Tower! :lol: ) for me. Where do the fanfares go, Patroick?

 

BTW I was chastised by a fellow organist yesterday for not playing BWV 630 after today's Mass but I pointed out two things: that I had played it every year (Sunday after Ascension) for the last 10 and also that Herr Triumpheret (however spelt), so say some, is more properly an Easter prelude. Hmm....

 

Peter

 

Fanfares can be improvised over the interlude, and also between the lines. Our organist created one for Guiting Power this morning, just to show off the Choir Trumpet, causing some alarm in the congregation! And yes, the interludes, fanfares and indeed the whole tune - they're all gloriously vulgar - just right for putting a smile on your face at a 9.30 Solemn Sung Mass! (For glorious vulgarity think Widor, Marche Pontificale - a bit of vulgarity amid the good taste adds an element of fun!)

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And yes, the interludes, fanfares and indeed the whole tune - they're all gloriously vulgar - just right for putting a smile on your face at a 9.30 Solemn Sung Mass!

Pardon me, but: At the name of Jesus ever'y knee shall bow; how is "vulgar" appropriate to these words?

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Pardon me, but: At the name of Jesus ever'y knee shall bow; how is "vulgar" appropriate to these words?

 

I think the problem is with the hymn rather than the tunes. When you read the Phillipians passage, which is one of the great theological statements of the NT, and then you compare it to the hymn you realise that we are ill-served by a hymn which is wordy and commences with words which should occur at the end.

 

None of the tunes are inspiring and Camberwell is just plain silly. While not a hymn, the song of Humility by-I think-Bill Ives is a sensitive setting of the Phillipians passage.

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