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Guest Psalm 78 v.67

Correct Pronunciation Of Stop Names

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Cymbelstern (s as in bus) or Zimbelstern (z as is buzz)?

 

P

"Tsimbellshtehrn" if spelt with a Z, otherwise I pronounce in as if it were English. :blink:

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Hi

 

I've a vague recollection of reading about one, so maybe there was. There was certainly an organ built with Latin stop names - it's on NPOR but I can't remember where (which isn't much help among the 30,000 or so surveys on the server!)

 

Every Blessing

 

Tony

 

Tony, for the record,

 

Torquay St John had Latin named stops as they were (translated!) changed when I was an apprentice working on the organ circa 1948. I seem to remember All Saints Babbacombe also had Latin stop names but do not know if and when they were changed.

 

Regards,

 

FF

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I wonder if anyone has come across an organ with Welsh stop names?

The new 3M+P Bill Drake organ proposed for Autumn 2004 in St Mary's Priory, Abergavenny had a Ffliwt 8 (an open Fluit 8 also borrowed to the pedal) which is the nearest I have come across. I assume lack of money stopped it being built or is fundraising still progressing?

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I wonder if anyone has come across an organ with Welsh stop names?

 

 

The organ of St Asaph Cathedral has a 32' reed named "Sarff" (Welsh for "Serpent").

 

Graham

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"Tsimbellshtehrn" if spelt with a Z, otherwise I pronounce in as if it were English. :blink:

Vox humana is entirely correct, I'm afraid. So sorry. :lol:

 

Best,

Friedrich

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The organ of St Asaph Cathedral has a 32' reed named "Sarff" (Welsh for "Serpent").

 

Graham

 

 

Pronounced as in "Sarff London" ?

 

H

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... For those who don't know it's a German word meaning "goat horn". The "horn" bit is pronounced as in English and the "G" is hard (as in "goat"). ...

 

A hard goat, Vox?

 

Hmmm....

 

This conjures-up a slightly alarming image of a goat bedecked in bovver-boots and a bandolier (for effect), with its nose and both ears pierced - and with a set of knuckle-dusters slung over its shoulder.

 

In retrospect, the most frightening thing which it is likely to do is to attempt to eat people's clothes.

 

And yes - before you ask - my summer wine order arrived today....

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Well I'm sorry to take the opposing view, but as far as I'm concerned if a Gemshorn appears in an otherwise English organ specification it is effectively a word which although of foreign origin has now been incorporated into the english language and may therefore have an adopted english pronunciation - in this case 'Jemshorn'. If we were to go around attempting to give all words of non-english origin their original pronuciation our conversation would turn into something out of 'Allo allo'. If we're prepared to call the capital of Austria "Vienna" this is a minor indescretion by comparison.

 

"Ah - allo - do you 'ave a lahsonse for that minky?"

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Neil, would I tell you what the name "Washington" signifies, in french,

if pronouced after the french manner, you would understand at once

why I prefer by far to stick to the original names !

 

Pierre

 

Oh, go on, Pierre - please!

 

(PM will be fine....)

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This conjures-up a slightly alarming image of a goat bedecked in bovver-boots and a bandolier (for effect), with its nose and both ears pierced - and with a set of knuckle-dusters slung over its shoulder.

Blimey, I know some very odd things go on in Daaarset, but do the goats really need such extreme self-defence measures?

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Tony, for the record,

 

Torquay St John had Latin named stops as they were (translated!) changed when I was an apprentice working on the organ circa 1948. I seem to remember All Saints Babbacombe also had Latin stop names but do not know if and when they were changed.

 

Regards,

 

FF

 

Thanks Frank - that may be 2 more - I thought the one I remembered was in the London area (and is on NPOR - the Latin stop lists for the 2 you mention aren't).

 

Every Blessing

 

Tony

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If we're prepared to call the capital of Austria "Vienna" this is a minor indescretion by comparison.

 

Ah, Vienna, Austria. City of those wonderful, romantic gondolas, and a land bounding with kangaroos.

 

You think I'm crazy? There really are kangaroos in Austria!

 

I used to walk my son, when he was a toddler, down to the zoo in Schoenbrunn to engender Australian nationalism in him. He'd spent the whole time saying "Look, duck." and ignoring the kangaroos. Sigh.

 

And it wasn't just tourists from one particular country who would ask where to find the gondolas. One poor, unfortunate tourist made the mistake of asking me. I gave him wonderfully detailed instructions, to the Sudbahnhof, from where he could catch the train from a particular platform (I've forgotten which). I seem to recall that I neglected to say that the train would take him across the border to Italy and the journey would last several hours.

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......Like tourists in Belgium asking for "french" fries. We'd send

them trough the Brussels southern station as well...

Do the Kangaroos eat flowers ?

 

Pierre

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......Like tourists in Belgium asking for "french" fries. We'd send

them trough the Brussels southern station as well...

Do the Kangaroos eat flowers ?

 

Pierre

 

Wer'e off the track again but.......

 

Some time ago a friend of mine, then not too worried about `one for the road' and his wife were driving home late at night from a concert in Winchester when she calmly said, "Look darling, there's a Kangaroo waiting at that bus stop". He looked - there was - and he nearly crashed the car. It seemed one has escaped from the local Zoo and happened to be sitting by the bus stop. He has never had a drink before driving since.

 

As our bus service is not always what it might be, I only hope the 'roo was still there when the bus turned up.

 

FF

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Wer'e off the track again but.......

 

Some time ago a friend of mine, then not too worried about `one for the road' and his wife were driving home late at night from a concert in Winchester when she calmly said, "Look darling, there's a Kangaroo waiting at that bus stop". He looked - there was - and he nearly crashed the car. It seemed one has escaped from the local Zoo and happened to be sitting by the bus stop. He has never had a drink before driving since.

 

As our bus service is not always what it might be, I only hope the 'roo was still there when the bus turned up.

 

FF

 

.....And also not devastating the garden behind the bus stop...

Pierre

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Guest Vox Humana 8'

What the hell have kangaroos in Austria got to do with the correct pronunciation of stop names?

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What the hell have kangaroos in Austria got to do with the correct pronunciation of stop names?

 

The same as to how to pronounce "Kéraulophone" in Australia.

 

Pierre

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The same as to how to pronounce "Kéraulophone" in Australia.

 

Pierre

 

I always thought that it was a Keraulophon not a Kérlaulophone. Gadzooks - even the Queen's Hall London had one! B)

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I always thought that it was a Keraulophon not a Kérlaulophone. Gadzooks - even the Queen's Hall London had one! B)

 

"Kéraulophone" is the french name; but as the french Principals already were slotted, this one

is often different from the british version....As for the spelling, well... B)

 

Pierre

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"Kéraulophone" is the french name; but as the french Principals already were slotted, this one

is often different from the british version....As for the spelling, well... B)

 

Pierre

 

Pierre, how does the French Kéraulophone compare then to say, a Gambe?

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Pierre, how does the French Kéraulophone compare then to say, a Gambe?

 

A bit wider, like the Salicional, between Principal and Gamba also, but stronger

than the Salicional.

But this is only one form; this stop was quite variable.

 

Pierre

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I always thought that it was a Keraulophon not a Kérlaulophone. Gadzooks - even the Queen's Hall London had one! B)

How do you pronounce the second syllable of Keraulophon?

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