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Earthquake Zones

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Folkestone Holy trinity - large 3 manual Walker (1st big revival rebuild in the county- 1966) Harmonic trumpet when heard from the opposite side of the chancel is mind-blowing...whole organ is pretty huge from there too.

 

Just as well that this organ is something of a caged beast, in a more open position it would be devastating.

 

It’s a shame the late JB never got his 32’ reed.

 

The chamade at Luton Parish Church needed a health warning when heard from the console. A similar effect can be gained from about five pints of Old Peculier

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I have never seen much mention of the late Garth Benson on this forum...a Redcliffe "character" if ever there was one!

Indeed he was - reputedly played in an overcoat and mittens in winter!

I sang there 1969-70, just after a Choirmaster had been appointed over his head to run the show (there were rumours of a Lay Clerks' revolt just before I arrived, unless someone other than GB were appointed to run the choir).

Slightly OT, I know, but this stirs memories of another bygone age: a coach was hired for the annual Lay Clerks' outing - a day touring the Cotswolds, with lunch at the Shakespeare Hotel in Stratford, tea at one of those villages with a quadruple-barrelled name and dinner at the Queen's Hotel in Cheltenham, the tab for all of which was picked up by the Churchwardens.

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St, Eustache, Paris.

 

I really was wondering when someone would get around to this one.

 

One could add almost anything by Rieger, especially when voiced by Mr. Pohl. Vierzehnheiligen......Nürnberg is quite a good place to hear it from. Its much too loud in the pub.

 

 

B

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I really was wondering when someone would get around to this one.

 

One could add almost anything by Rieger, especially when voiced by Mr. Pohl. Vierzehnheiligen......Nürnberg is quite a good place to hear it from. Its much too loud in the pub.

 

 

B

 

I think one might say the same of St Giles' Cathedral, Edinburgh. Despite its many beautiful sounds up to mf or f, anything more than that soon become oppressive. Full organ, event in the most distant recesses of the building, is painfully loud. On the rare occasions when mega-decibels are needed, a better answer would be to bring in a brass ensemble.

 

JS

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"I think one might say the same of St Giles' Cathedral, Edinburgh. Despite its many beautiful sounds up to mf or f, anything more than that soon become oppressive. Full organ, event in the most distant recesses of the building, is painfully loud. On the rare occasions when mega-decibels are needed, a better answer would be to bring in a brass ensemble."

 

Totally agree. And there's not a lot of colour at less than mf to chose from (try finding a solo stop other than the ubiquitous Sesquialtera for a baroque chorale prelude...)

 

A great organ for Petr Eben and....ehhh...... Anton Heiller! :lol:

 

Bazuin

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Anyone think the reeds of St Michael Cornhill are particularly loud from the console?

Has anyone also heard the Great Trumpets at St Augustine, Queens Gate, Kensington? From the console, they overpower the rest of the organ so thats basically the only thing you hear on full organ! Sounds as loud as the notre dame chamades!

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I think that the 64ft+128ft stop on the organ at Hammerwood park is worth a mention. The stop label says "selfdestruct". Unfortunately it is only an electronic, but I am sure that the owner would have used a real one if space and funds had permitted.

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Has anyone also heard the Great Trumpets at St Augustine, Queens Gate, Kensington? From the console, they overpower the rest of the organ so thats basically the only thing you hear on full organ! Sounds as loud as the notre dame chamades!

 

Well - this is a strange organ anyway - lots of stops and nothing balances/ blends with anything else IMO (1969) - the only memorable thing about practising there was the cleaner (verger?) who usually brought his dog into the church - and it barked (probably at my playing) and he would go about SHOUTING "don't bark in church!!, don't bark in church!!"....

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Well - this is a strange organ anyway - lots of stops and nothing balances/ blends with anything else IMO (1969) - the only memorable thing about practising there was the cleaner (verger?) who usually brought his dog into the church - and it barked (probably at my playing) and he would go about SHOUTING "don't bark in church!!, don't bark in church!!"....

 

Many of the stops are useless, including a lot of the great organ, which (except for the ear-splitting trumpets!) is quite soft. I still wonder why when H&H did work on it they didnt revoice or replace those disgusting reeds with more romantic trombas or posaunes on a lower wind pressure, and possibly added a more suiting Choir Tuba.

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Many of the stops are useless, including a lot of the great organ, which (except for the ear-splitting trumpets!) is quite soft. I still wonder why when H&H did work on it they didnt revoice or replace those disgusting reeds with more romantic trombas or posaunes on a lower wind pressure, and possibly added a more suiting Choir Tuba.

 

The 1872 organ was obviously lost by fire in 1953, but who the bloody hell was "TUNKS" who did things to it in 1924(?)

 

:lol:

 

DW

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The 1872 organ was obviously lost by fire in 1953, but who the bloody hell was "TUNKS" who did things to it in 1924(?)

 

:lol:

 

DW

I believe there were a couple of them knocking about just South of the river. Charles and Frederick I think, with some associations to G & D, Bishops and TCL. Don't know a lot more than that.

 

AJS

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The 1872 organ was obviously lost by fire in 1953, but who the bloody hell was "TUNKS" who did things to it in 1924(?)

 

:lol:

 

DW

 

These "TUNKS", whom ive never heard of, may have something to do with this pile of ****, some parts of the old one could have been saved. Never trust an unknown organ builder!

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Back on topic, the Exeter College Walker sends a rumble through the chapel, even with only a couple of great stops on! Its way too big for the chapel, especially that 16ft Pedal Bombarde!!!!!!!

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These "TUNKS", whom ive never heard of, may have something to do with this pile of ****, some parts of the old one could have been saved. Never trust an unknown organ builder!

 

Hi

 

NPOR to the rescue again. DBOB has:-

 

TUNKS Frederic

Floruit: 1879-1950+

Located: London

Trade: ob

traded as F.Tunks & Son, 1926D-50+

 

Addresses used by this firm

Address From To

North Rd, Clapham, London SW 1926D 1938D

Northbourne Rd, Clapham, London SW 1939D 1950+

 

References for the information above

 

Trade Directories: Kelly London County 1926-31/33-44/46-50+

Bishop & Son, Organ Builders: Elvin, L. (1984), pp.86, 90 & 249

BIOS J22 (1998): Gray, C., p.13

 

Cross references for this firm

 

Bishop & Son - trained by & worked for (head voicer by 1879)

 

Lewis, T.C. - worked for (voicer; foreman; partner in 1911)

 

Tunks - ?connection with ?same as

 

The other 2 Tunks listed were both employees rather than owners.

 

Every Blessing

 

Tony

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The 1872 organ was obviously lost by fire in 1953, but who the bloody hell was "TUNKS" who did things to it in 1924(?)

 

:lol:

 

DW

 

When I first was a tuner's assistant the tuner I worked with had a pretty poor view of a chap called Tunks. Seems as if it may be the one Tony speaks of - he was working in the London area post war, when he seems to have cobbled together instruments of dubious quality from whatever bits and pieces he could find. We visited a couple of his efforts - least said, soonest mended I'm afraid. Working just post war must have been difficult, but even so others managed rather better than he seems to have done.

 

Regards to all

 

John

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I would nominate a couple; The Royal Hospital School, Holbrook (West End organ) and in London, All Hallows, Gospel Oak. When hearing the former in a Howells Psalm Prelude, I actually ducked between the pews as the crescendo grew. On a good day and in the right hands, I believe the Hill in Gospel Oak can change the London weather pattern. Both most interesting buildings though.

Best wishes,

N

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I would nominate a couple; The Royal Hospital School, Holbrook (West End organ) and in London, All Hallows, Gospel Oak. When hearing the former in a Howells Psalm Prelude, I actually ducked between the pews as the crescendo grew. On a good day and in the right hands, I believe the Hill in Gospel Oak can change the London weather pattern. Both most interesting buildings though.

Best wishes,

N

 

Definately the Royal Hospital School one is extremely loud. But ive never heard the one at All Hallows except for a couple of youtube videos and full great+swell doesnt seem so loud in the video comparing to less organ used! But ill have to go there myself and see.

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Another two "Earthquake Zones" are the two post-WW2 Walker giants, at the City Temple and St Columba Scottish church, London. They arnt very interesting instruments, nothing great about them, except the string choruses which in my opinion are amazing!

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I'd like to add a 13 stop Willis 3 in a small village church in the Cotswolds. I think it might be Miserden, although don't quote me on that. From memory, the church seats about 70, and the voicing was conceived on a grand scale. gt was 8 8 8 4, swell was 8 8 8 8 4 8 (Horn) with octave and sub, pedal was 16 (full length open metal) 16 8. You could accompany the Sunday congregation on the Gt Dulciana coupled to the Swell Open. Increase the sound according to the number of stops and couplers, and you get the picture. Job was about 10' from the console, very unpleasant after more than about 2 minutes.

 

I also recall standing in the Choir directly opposite the Arthur Wills Ely organ at full tilt. That is the most uncomfortable aural experience I have had; I remember saying that it was bordering on evil, still couldn't hear it down the nave although it was fine in the pub.

 

AJS

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The 1872 organ was obviously lost by fire in 1953, but who the bloody hell was "TUNKS" who did things to it in 1924(?)

 

:lol:

 

DW

 

Tunks was also involved in the 1921-2 "work" to the 1838 Hill organ of Christ Church, Newgate Street - designed by Gauntlett and played by Mendelssohn . In his book "The Organs of the City of London", Nick Plumley is scathing of this firms work "Tunks of Clapham began a process of destroying this most important historical instrument's integrity by throwing out upperwork from all departments and by adding harmonic trebles to the chorus reeds".

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Edgbaston Old Church is so loud that the organist has protection from it in the form of a 1" thick slab of perspex suspended above the bench.

 

This is not a windup: vide http://www.bhamorgan.org.uk/organs/081.htm and click the middle thumbnail.

 

It is at such a height as to more or less guarantee banging your head on it whilst getting onto the bench.

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...more or less guarantee banging your head on it whilst getting onto the bench.

 

...and again when you get off the bench if your memory is as bad as mine!! :unsure:

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