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Christopher Dearnley - Dominus Regit Me


MAB
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It's funny how small pieces of music lodge in your mind. Often they are not particularly good pieces, but something about them touches something inside you, and they never let you go. If you come across them years later, it can be like meeting an old friend, and you can literally feel the years roll away.

 

I have had this Proustian experience many times, although quite often it was a piece of music I heard as a young student when first learning the organ.

 

I remember being captivated by a particular Dandrieu Noel (recorded by Alan Spedding at Beverley Minster), and remember my equal delight at finding a dusty copy in the back of Westminster Library years later.

 

I also remember an old vicar of mine literally running down the aisle when he heard me play the Bridge Adagio in E ; he had heard it once years before and had fallen in love with it on the spot, without ever knowing what it was, and being unable to find out.

 

The immediate point of this thread is to ask if anyone could direct me to a copy of Christopher Dearnley's Dominus regit me ; I remember hearing it recorded at St Paul's after the Mander rebuild, and a reference to it at lunchtime today stirred those memories in the back of my mind. I recall it as being rather a shapely little piece, and believe it was published in the Cramer Cathedral Organist collection, although my searches of the usual sources have drawn a blank.

 

I would be grateful if anyone has any leads and, at the same time, would love to hear what other pieces have captivated members of the board in this way over the years.

 

Best regards,

M

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It's funny how small pieces of music lodge in your mind. Often they are not particularly good pieces, but something about them touches something inside you, and they never let you go. If you come across them years later, it can be like meeting an old friend, and you can literally feel the years roll away.

 

I have had this Proustian experience many times, although quite often it was a piece of music I heard as a young student when first learning the organ.

 

I remember being captivated by a particular Dandrieu Noel (recorded by Alan Spedding at Beverley Minster), and remember my equal delight at finding a dusty copy in the back of Westminster Library years later.

 

I also remember an old vicar of mine literally running down the aisle when he heard me play the Bridge Adagio in E ; he had heard it once years before and had fallen in love with it on the spot, without ever knowing what it was, and being unable to find out.

 

The immediate point of this thread is to ask if anyone could direct me to a copy of Christopher Dearnley's Dominus regit me ; I remember hearing it recorded at St Paul's after the Mander rebuild, and a reference to it at lunchtime today stirred those memories in the back of my mind. I recall it as being rather a shapely little piece, and believe it was published in the Cramer Cathedral Organist collection, although my searches of the usual sources have drawn a blank.

 

I would be grateful if anyone has any leads and, at the same time, would love to hear what other pieces have captivated members of the board in this way over the years.

 

Best regards,

M

 

 

=====================

 

 

I can't help, but I can't resist mentioning four other English works which delight me, and which no-one ever seems to play:-

 

1) Alleluyas - Simon Preston

2) The Diversion for Mixtures - Jackson

3) A fancy (manuals only) - Peter Hurford

4) Pastoral - Peter Racine Fricker

 

This is all good stuff you know!

 

Throw away the Howells!

 

MM

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It's funny how small pieces of music lodge in your mind. Often they are not particularly good pieces, but something about them touches something inside you, and they never let you go. If you come across them years later, it can be like meeting an old friend, and you can literally feel the years roll away.

 

I have had this Proustian experience many times, although quite often it was a piece of music I heard as a young student when first learning the organ.

 

I remember being captivated by a particular Dandrieu Noel (recorded by Alan Spedding at Beverley Minster), and remember my equal delight at finding a dusty copy in the back of Westminster Library years later.

 

I also remember an old vicar of mine literally running down the aisle when he heard me play the Bridge Adagio in E ; he had heard it once years before and had fallen in love with it on the spot, without ever knowing what it was, and being unable to find out.

 

The immediate point of this thread is to ask if anyone could direct me to a copy of Christopher Dearnley's Dominus regit me ; I remember hearing it recorded at St Paul's after the Mander rebuild, and a reference to it at lunchtime today stirred those memories in the back of my mind. I recall it as being rather a shapely little piece, and believe it was published in the Cramer Cathedral Organist collection, although my searches of the usual sources have drawn a blank.

 

I would be grateful if anyone has any leads and, at the same time, would love to hear what other pieces have captivated members of the board in this way over the years.

 

Best regards,

M

 

A little Googling produced this result http://www.music-exchange.co.uk/products/1...39/details.html

 

Good luck!

 

Graham

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I remember being captivated by a particular Dandrieu Noel (recorded by Alan Spedding at Beverley Minster), and remember my equal delight at finding a dusty copy in the back of Westminster Library years later.

I

 

'Same with me on this one - and I found it/play it quite often at Christmas!!

 

AJJ

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=====================

I can't help, but I can't resist mentioning four other English works which delight me, and which no-one ever seems to play:-

 

1) Alleluyas - Simon Preston

2) The Diversion for Mixtures - Jackson

3) A fancy (manuals only) - Peter Hurford

4) Pastoral - Peter Racine Fricker

 

This is all good stuff you know!

 

Throw away the Howells!

 

MM

 

And these!!

 

AJJ

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Gosh, that's a blast from the past! Must dig it out again....

 

But would you confess to playing the recapitulation upon a Tuba stop or, heaven forfend, PCND's chamade? B)

 

Yes, if there's one there - John Scott does it!

 

AJJ

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The simon preston is a great piece - its in one of those Oxford editions, and i know some people avoid them like the plague now, as so much of the music in them is heavily dated in the 60's

 

Release it as a single copy, or in a book fo some sort ot increase the interest me thinks

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Gosh, that's a blast from the past! Must dig it out again....

 

But would you confess to playing the recapitulation upon a Tuba stop or, heaven forfend, PCND's chamade? B)

Oh great! That makes three insults in one post.

 

(1: Anything by Mathias - BLEAH!!!)

 

(2: You mentioned the T-word)

 

(3: Another derogatory comment about my wonderful chamades.)

 

I am , of course, keeping a careful note of all comments....

 

:P

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Oh great! That makes three insults in one post.

 

(1: Anything by Mathias - BLEAH!!!)

 

(2: You mentiones the T-word)

 

(3: Another derogatory comment about my wonderful chamades.)

 

I am , of course, keeping a careful note of all comments....

 

:P

 

I simply couldn't resist it! B)

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Just a note to thank Graham for the google link ; I will certainly try and take this further.

 

I have been amused by some of the pieces thrown up by this thread.

 

Every year or so I have a good look through my library and weed out those pieces which - being honest - I am never going to play again.

 

On that basis, I am afraid the Mathias Processional went to the great second-hand shop in the sky a few years ago. Alleluyas survived by the skin of its teeth.

 

M

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The immediate point of this thread is to ask if anyone could direct me to a copy of Christopher Dearnley's Dominus regit me ; I remember hearing it recorded at St Paul's after the Mander rebuild, and a reference to it at lunchtime today stirred those memories in the back of my mind. I recall it as being rather a shapely little piece, and believe it was published in the Cramer Cathedral Organist collection, although my searches of the usual sources have drawn a blank.

 

This may be a long shot, but I think you are right that it was in the Cranmer Catherdral Organist collection. I don't have it but a few years ago I tried to track down Clifford Harker's Rouen Processional which I think was in the same book but was making little progress until I went and knocked on the door of Cranmer's office (first floor - no shop) in Garrick Street (details here http://www.mpaonline.org.uk/About/members/..._Music_Ltd.html ) and a nice chap said it was out of print but printed me a copy for a small fee. I did not think at the time to get the rest of the collection. You could always try.

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========================

I always start giggling when I think of daft druids striding into the Caernarfen Castle in white, flowing robes and wearing silly hats.....sorry!

 

:rolleyes:

 

MM

 

Accepted!!

 

AJJ

 

PS There were some about when I passed Stonehenge on the way to work the other day - no hats though.

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