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Thalben-ball's Elegy


JWAnderson
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Guest Barry Williams
Hi all,

 

This piece has become one of my favourites after hearing it quite a few times, but my question is does anyone on this board know where to find a copy on the internet?

Also is it very difficult to learn?

 

Thanks

JA

 

The better known Elegy is published by Paxton and copies are readily available on the second-hand market.

 

However, there is another superb Elegy by GTB on page 36 of 'A Little Organ Book' , the contents of which were all written 'in loving memory' of C. Hubert H. Parry. That volume was published by Ascherberg, Hopwood & Crew Ltd. It contains some gems, all in miniature. The pieces are all easy but delightful.

 

Barry Williams

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The better known Elegy is published by Paxton and copies are readily available on the second-hand market.

 

However, there is another superb Elegy by GTB on page 36 of 'The Little Organ Book' , the contents of which were all written 'in loving memory' of C. Hubert H. Parry. That volume was published by Ascherberg, Hopwood & Crew Ltd. It contains some gems, all in miniature. The pieces are all easy but delightful.

 

Barry Williams

Yes, I forgot about the other Elegy, and the book in memory of Parry. Something else to dig out and have a look at again. Thanks Barry!

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I'd just like to put in a word for the B flat Elegy which I think is a wonderful piece. It is so tuneful and easy to listen to that is all too easy to dismiss it as Classic F M music, but if it is played musically without hamming it up, it has real soul and dignity. I have included it in programmes where the rest of the music has been pretty uncompromising, and it has held its place with pride.

 

A real jewel, IMHO.

 

M

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I'd just like to put in a word for the B flat Elegy which I think is a wonderful piece. It is so tuneful and easy to listen to that is all too easy to dismiss it as Classic F M music, but if it is played musically without hamming it up, it has real soul and dignity. I have included it in programmes where the rest of the music has been pretty uncompromising, and it has held its place with pride.

 

A real jewel, IMHO.

 

M

 

Absolutely... on 17th August 2008 it will sit happily in the middle of a programme for the 4.30pm Sunday Recital at Notre Dame de Paris.

;)

P

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Guest Barry Williams
I'd just like to put in a word for the B flat Elegy which I think is a wonderful piece. It is so tuneful and easy to listen to that is all too easy to dismiss it as Classic F M music, but if it is played musically without hamming it up, it has real soul and dignity. I have included it in programmes where the rest of the music has been pretty uncompromising, and it has held its place with pride.

 

A real jewel, IMHO.

 

M

 

I agree. The Tune in E in the style of John Stanley is also excellent and unjustly neglected.

 

Barry Williams

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I'd just like to put in a word for the B flat Elegy which I think is a wonderful piece. It is so tuneful and easy to listen to that is all too easy to dismiss it as Classic F M music, but if it is played musically without hamming it up, it has real soul and dignity. I have included it in programmes where the rest of the music has been pretty uncompromising, and it has held its place with pride.

 

A real jewel, IMHO.

 

M

 

 

I remember playing it in a recital many years ago in London and afterwards one member of the aufience said that the two pices from the programme that he could listen to "for ever" were that and the Franck A minor Chorale! It is a truly beautiful piece.

 

Peter

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It would be good to list a few other gems that might be in danger of falling out of the repertoire. No accounting for taste, of course, but does anyone play anything by Harvey Grace? His Resurgam used to be one of John Birch's big pieces at one time. Shame about the title, but there a lovely little piece called In-Voluntary in one of two volumes of six pieces. Hurford - Dialogues? Gordon Jacob - Paean? Has anyone tried any of June Nixon's pieces, published by Mayhew? All well-crafted. If you like lush, there's the Sydney Campbell "Lento" (I think) in the Canterbury Organ Album, and what about Paul Edward's piece piece based on Contemplation? Sorry , these are a bit random!

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If you like lush, there's the Sydney Campbell "Lento" (I think) in the Canterbury Organ Album

Ah yes. Harmony strictly for consenting adults in private. Good piece. This will be the second of his three "Canterbury Improvisations". Didn't know it had been reprinted. (It's spelt Sidney by the way)

 

Back to GTB and in much the same vein as the Campbell (couple all the 8' stops and juggle the swell boxes) is his "Edwardia" from the Hovingham Sketches. The height of soupy chromaticism, but ever so competently handled.

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It would be good to list a few other gems that might be in danger of falling out of the repertoire. No accounting for taste, of course, but does anyone play anything by Harvey Grace? His Resurgam used to be one of John Birch's big pieces at one time. Shame about the title, but there a lovely little piece called In-Voluntary in one of two volumes of six pieces. Hurford - Dialogues? Gordon Jacob - Paean? Has anyone tried any of June Nixon's pieces, published by Mayhew? All well-crafted. If you like lush, there's the Sydney Campbell "Lento" (I think) in the Canterbury Organ Album, and what about Paul Edward's piece piece based on Contemplation? Sorry , these are a bit random!

 

I used a June Nixon piece At the River in a recital recently. Very effective as you say. Paul Edwards has produced some delicious sruff - his Three Preludes for example. I've always had a soft spot for Martin's Evensong. The Oxford Modern Organ Music books had some good pieces as well. Someone mentioned Preston's Alleluias which I have always enjoyed (though not played for a decade or so - perhaps I'll dust it down). I also think that that is where Matthias's omnipresent Processional first appeared.

 

I really like the way this forum encourages us to look over past music which we may have put on the shelf years ago and perhaps look at a few new pieces.

 

Peter

 

Peter

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Absolutely... on 17th August 2008 it will sit happily in the middle of a programme for the 4.30pm Sunday Recital at Notre Dame de Paris.

:D

P

 

I hope that you will be using the Chamades by Robert Boisseau for the climax.... :)

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Guest Psalm 78 v.67
I hope that you will be using the Chamades by Robert Boisseau for the climax.... :D

 

There speaks a man obsessed! :)

 

You will never get away from chamade jokes now! (Be afraid - VERY AFRAID!)

 

Oops - sorry, WM, we're getting off-topic!! ;)

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There speaks a man obsessed! :)

 

You will never get away from chamade jokes now! (Be afraid - VERY AFRAID!)

 

Oops - sorry, WM, we're getting off-topic!! :D

 

In all seriousness, using the 'S. Sernin' Chamades on the organ of Nôtre-Dame de Paris, at the climax in the Thalben-Ball Elegy should work well; they are somewhat less fiery than those by Robert Boisseau; they also have more 'body' to the tone.

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Absolutely... on 17th August 2008 it will sit happily in the middle of a programme for the 4.30pm Sunday Recital at Notre Dame de Paris.

;)

P

OOOoo. I can just hear it: Full Fonds 16, 8, 4 (Ped 32 & full mutations) at the start of the second section. Nice.

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Continuing this subject of 'forgotten gems', on Saturday I went to a recital at my local parish church in Dorking by Jane Watts, of which more in a moment,

 

It was a most attractive programme, and she played the Arietta in A by William Lloyd Webber - a delightful piece of pastiche Mozart, but so elegantly crafted and attractive that I will be trying to find a copy later today. Highly recommended.

 

Now, that recital.

 

The first thing to mention was that the church was full - a testament, I expect, to having a first class player, and staff at the church who pushed the concert very hard. It was for an excellent cause, namely, to raise money to endow an organ and / or choral scholarship at the church for talented teenagers to prepare them for a university scholarship.

 

It was free admission with donations invited at the end.

 

Her playing was exemplary throughout - a model of unassuming, controlled musicality, such that you only ever heard the music. Everything sounded so right, so natural, and just so musical. Much of this was down to unrushed tempi. I know the organ well and, frankly, it is rather a dull instrument. However, instead of just hearing the organ and lamenting its shortcomings (as I usually do) I found that I was no longer aware of what it sounded like, I was just so riveted by the playing.

 

Plenty of attractive music in the programme, finishing with the Allegro, Adagio and Toccata from Widor 5. These were played so well that even a hardened old cynic like me enjoyed every last note. You could tell from the silence that the audience was gripped.

 

In these days when we hear so much about the death of the organ recital, it was a breath of fresh air. Due to family committments, I rarely get to live recitals nowadays, so to hear playing this good was an inspiration. It made me think 'I wish I could play the organ' all over again, and reminded me what a huge privilege it is to play this instrument.

 

M

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