Jump to content
Mander Organs
DHM

Another Choir Bites The Dust...

Recommended Posts

Guest Patrick Coleman
Research has showed that the traditional skills of visiting and conducting decent worship produce stable success.

 

Barry Williams

 

The sad thing is that we seem to need research to tell us this.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest Barry Williams
The sad thing is that we seem to need research to tell us this.

 

 

Whilst it is sad, the information is there, in clear and unmistakable terms, yet is still ignored by many.

 

There is nothing wrong with research - only with those who prefer not to take cogniscence of competent results. At present some dioceses are using a system of evaluation of candidates for ordination that has been consistently discredited since 1962. Small wonder that church music goes wrong.

 

Barry Williams

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest Lee Blick
Research has showed that the traditional skills of visiting and conducting decent worship produce stable success. Regrettably, many of the clergy seem intent to 'make progress' in terms of their perception of liturgy, often preferring to sit at their computers devising 'liturgies' rather than focusing their minds on the real purpose of the religion

 

So if there is there is the research, is this being fed through to the theological colleges? Where is the academic/pastoral leadership to ensure these traditional skills are being retained?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Indeed, the 'traditional' often fails for want of enthusiasm. The 'modern' has a high initial rate of success but a high fall off rate.

 

Research has showed that the traditional skills of visiting and conducting decent worship produce stable success. Regrettably, many of the clergy seem intent to 'make progress' in terms of their perception of liturgy, often preferring to sit at their computers devising 'liturgies' rather than focusing their minds on the real purpose of the religion.

 

Barry Williams

 

Hi

 

And equally important is the attitudes of the congregation - especially to people who aren't "like us". A genuinely welcoming and supportive congregation makes a big difference. As pointed out elsewhere on the board, the church is the people - not the building, and not just the minister!

 

There's nothing wrong with clergy spending time preparing worship! I reckon on at least a full day each week to prepare a sermon and put the service together - and sometimes more. (we don't have a set pattern or a formal liturgy) We do less than average amount of visiting - but that's because we're, theorectically, part time, and more significantly, the church has appointed a very competant Pastoral Visitor (who was in place long before we arrived on the scene). Joan does all the "routine" visits, leaving Sue & I free to concentrate on the priority that the church gace us when we moved here - regular teaching and good worship. Joan will sometimes ring and let us know if someone needs more than a "routine" visit - and that, along with "crisis" visits is a priority - some people were surprised that we did a hospital visit on Christmas Day last year, but as far as I'm concerned, that's a key part of the "job". We also make an effort to visit or meet all our congregation at other times.

 

Every Blessing

 

Tony

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

FYI:

 

There is a good, well balanced comment piece by Richard Morrison about this story in this month's BBC music magazine (November). BBC don't publish this online, but probably worth a flick next time you are near a news stand.

 

Regards, David.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Please sign in to comment

You will be able to leave a comment after signing in



Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...