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Cd Inlay Booklet


David Coram
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I have a six page (single sheet folded into three) CD inlay booklet to fill. What do members of the forum consider essential information to go into this space? How much, if any, should be devoted to pictures of the organ, and how technical should these be?

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Without knowing anything about your CD (perhaps some details David?) I always thinkt he best booklets are those that include information about the music performed, the instrument ( a specification, perhaps when it was put into that state, How long the instrument has been located in its present position) and a little about the performer

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Without knowing anything about your CD (perhaps some details David?) I always thinkt he best booklets are those that include information about the music performed, the instrument ( a specification, perhaps when it was put into that state, How long the instrument has been located in its present position) and a little about the performer

 

It's about 70 minutes of complete mixed bag stuff from Romsey - Guilmant, Bridge, Franck, lots of Bach (2 trios, 2 chorale preludes and a fugue), Gigout Scherzo etc. I'm trying to resist doing the whole "The Organ of Romsey Abbey" thing and trying to avoid slapping my name all over it. Which leaves me at a bit of a loss and only a couple of days left to get the artwork and text finished!

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I have a six page (single sheet folded into three) CD inlay booklet to fill. What do members of the forum consider essential information to go into this space? How much, if any, should be devoted to pictures of the organ, and how technical should these be?

 

 

You have to bear in mind your likely audience which are, at least half, serious organ-lovers. On that basis, I would include at the very least a full spec of the organ (accessories perhaps omitted) and a photo of the console.

 

I find it very helpful when listening to a CD to have the programme stated the same on the back of the booklet as it is on the back of the CD case. This saves a lot of reaching around. Dates and potted biographies of all composers (unless they're exceptionaly well known) ought to be there, so ought a decent biog of yourself and a potted history of the organ, which in the case of Romsey's fabulous Walker could be covered in about three lines.

 

I have taken to including comments about particular stops that can be heard in each track (where I have space) and if these are in italics, they can be easily ignored by anyone who's not bothered one way or the other. The fact is, the more information you give (even if it is as small as 7pt type) the more several of your purchasers are going to enjoy the CD. I also believe that reviewers generally look very kindly on this sort of thing. If you still have space left, a few nice photos (even if they are in b and w) add to the pleasure for purchasers.

 

Good luck with it all!

 

I'm delighted you are back and active on this forum, I though it was organ-builder training taking your time, but at least in part this must have been your recording project. Very sensible. I don't know which company you eventually went to, but if you want a few tips on where to send copies or how to get rid of the CDs other than personal sales, give me a PM.

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It's about 70 minutes of complete mixed bag stuff from Romsey - Guilmant, Bridge, Franck, lots of Bach (2 trios, 2 chorale preludes and a fugue), Gigout Scherzo etc. I'm trying to resist doing the whole "The Organ of Romsey Abbey" thing and trying to avoid slapping my name all over it. Which leaves me at a bit of a loss and only a couple of days left to get the artwork and text finished!

I was about to write that it depends on what market you are going for with your CD but of course a purchaser of a CD usually buys it without getting to look at the inside of the liner so it is not part of the sales process but additional information once they start listening. With a 'mixed bag' programme I would expect something about the music being played, the organ and anything unusual about it including the specification, and the performer. Also, I suggest you try and avoid fancy artwork that makes reading the text difficult (e.g. Pulling Out All The Stops - TT at Symphony Hall, Birmingham).

 

I find that in general apart from specifications the technical detail is limited, but if you want to go technical I found one of the most fascinating inlays was the David Briggs CD Bach at Gloucester where for each item he provided detailed registrations (that were far from straightforward).

 

Although I have not heard it I believe you have a unique and very interesting instrument at Romsey and as far as I know there are no available recordings so look forward to hearing it even though I have (over)reached shelf capacity and have been banned from making further purchases Good luck with it.

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You have to bear in mind your likely audience which are, at least half, serious organ-lovers. On that basis, I would include at the very least a full spec of the organ (accessories perhaps omitted) and a photo of the console.

 

I find it very helpful when listening to a CD to have the programme stated the same on the back of the booklet as it is on the back of the CD case. This saves a lot of reaching around. Dates and potted biographies of all composers (unless they're exceptionaly well known) ought to be there, so ought a decent biog of yourself and a potted history of the organ, which in the case of Romsey's fabulous Walker could be covered in about three lines.

 

I have taken to including comments about particular stops that can be heard in each track (where I have space) and if these are in italics, they can be easily ignored by anyone who's not bothered one way or the other. The fact is, the more information you give (even if it is as small as 7pt type) the more several of your purchasers are going to enjoy the CD. I also believe that reviewers generally look very kindly on this sort of thing. If you still have space left, a few nice photos (even if they are in b and w) add to the pleasure for purchasers.

 

Good luck with it all!

 

I'm delighted you are back and active on this forum, I though it was organ-builder training taking your time, but at least in part this must have been your recording project. Very sensible. I don't know which company you eventually went to, but if you want a few tips on where to send copies or how to get rid of the CDs other than personal sales, give me a PM.

 

 

Rather bizarrely, I am replying to my own posting. It is by way of general observations on the subject of CD production, but information worth sharing, I hope.

 

Recently, comments have been made on this site about downloaded music etc. etc.

Readers may be unaware of the real cost of producing a CD. To take a case in point, I am currently seeing through the process something I recorded about two weeks ago, we'd like it available by Christmas, mostly for the benefit of the sponsor. Leaving aside the cost of the performer (£0.00 in this case) and the producer/editor (who charges very reasonably indeed) the actual discs (when produced from one's own edited master) are surprisingly cheap these days. The company I intend to use can run off 1000 copies of an 80-minute CD, with 8 page booklet (colour covers), cello wrapped for 74p each plus VAT. The same package with a 12-page booklet costs (wait for it!) 4p more per copy. As far as I'm concerned, this is a very powerful argument for always including bucket-loads of notes etc.... this is what really helps make CD purchases a pleasure IMHO.

 

One danger to be aware of: if you record a programme, always use a decent percentage of Public Domain items. Not long ago I made a CD of Edwardian organs, and naturally picked an Edwardian-style programme. The copyrights for that CD (payable to MCPS) came to a little over £800 which was more than I paid my producer/editor! All of this, please note, is by nature of an upfront payment before you get anything back.

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I guess it’s a matter of personal preference. I like to see a short history/specification of the organ, a brief description of the pieces (including what, if any, “special” stops were used), a brief biography of the performer, and (space permitting) photos of the organ.

 

:)

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Speaking as a consumer, not a producer, I agree very much with Cynic's points above, except in the matter of print size. With my aging eyes I really struggle with tiny print. I can just about cope with 7 point, but I find it a bit of a strain.

 

Other than that, I can really only repeat his advice. My first thought was that six sides is a bit skimpy, so I was interested to see his comment about this. If you stick with six sides you will immediately lose two, because one will be given over to the cover and the back will (or should) be given over to a track listing (even if it is also on the back of the CD). I would prefer notes on the music to be given priority over notes on the organ. I would certainly want to see the specification of the organ and a photo of the console; the history should be kept brief, especially if (as I imagine is likely) the majority of your sales will be to visitors to the abbey and other non organists. We need a photo of you along with your potted CV, but you could save yourself one photo by having yourself pictured at the console.

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From my own experience; notes on the pieces, brief history of the organ (many also like a stop list!), biog notes about you. In two minds about pictures, my thoughts are only to include a picture if its a good one. ie, not one taken from the other end of the church wheich ends up looking tiny in the booklet. If you have to choose, I'd always go for a console picture rather than the case, but I think I'll be in a minority here.

 

Bering in mind that you will probably want to sell CDs to non-organists, be careful with technical language in your booklet notes. I popped in a line about 'thumbing down' in the Lemare Andante and (on the advice of a much more recorded artist) later added a brief comment as to what that actually meant.

 

One more piece of advice, proof read, proof read and proof read again. Then get three good friends and one particularly sticky enemy and get them to proof read it. I read mine over and over again, and it was only at the last minute that

 

'...he has given many pubic performances...' was spotted, thus saving great embarrassment. Spell checkers only highlight wrong spellings that aren't real words.

 

Good luck with it. I do hope you'll advertise it here when its ready. Who has done the recording/producing? Have you thought of a title for the disc yet?

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Wow! I wasn't expecting quite such a lot of very detailed replies. Thank you all so much for your time and advice (especially Paul - I've already nicked the idea about putting tech-heavy stuff in italics!)

 

I'll probably refrain from advertising here out of respect for others with CD's who manage to restrain themselves from total shameless self promotion... having said that, it will be available before Christmas at a very reasonable price! Like Sean's, Andrew Post (Vif Records) has done the producing and editing (not tooooo much of the latter...) and I think he's got the sound perfect.

 

No sign of a title yet, either - really trying to avoid "The Organ of Romsey Abbey" and "The Magic of Coram" and any of the other obvious ones. How about a competition, free copy for the winner!!! :)

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I guess it’s a matter of personal preference. I like to see a short history/specification of the organ, a brief description of the pieces (including what, if any, “special” stops were used), a brief biography of the performer, and (space permitting) photos of the organ.

 

:)

And don't forget... a photo of the performer. It's always good to put a face to the name. I always appreciate some basic registration notes; Marie-Claire Alain is very good at providing information that is both interesting and useful.

JC

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I have a six page (single sheet folded into three) CD inlay booklet to fill. What do members of the forum consider essential information to go into this space? ....

 

CD inlays are a skill in their own right and the others have helped enormously with their suggestions.

But what I would add for my two penn'ith is that you should include a link to a website - one that is unlikely to change - where people could go for more information. This might be for the performers the pieces, the organ - or whatever, but as long as you could have access to a page where you can flesh out anything you feel you'd have liked to have included but couldn't.

Failing that, a disposable email address. Gmail has a very good spam filter so I use a gmail account for things like this when I want an address out in the public domain but don't want to get buried in very unlikely products given that I'm a Sheila.

 

All the best and I'll look forward to seeing this when it's done!

cheers

Jenny

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I'll probably refrain from advertising here out of respect for others with CD's who manage to restrain themselves from total shameless self promotion... having said that, it will be available before Christmas at a very reasonable price! Like Sean's, Andrew Post (Vif Records) has done the producing and editing (not tooooo much of the latter...) and I think he's got the sound perfect.

 

Whether shameless (or otherwise) self promotion is allowed or not, I care not!

 

David, I'm really lookling forward to it - put me down for one! :wacko:

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Whether shameless (or otherwise) self promotion is allowed or not, I care not!

 

David, I'm really lookling forward to it - put me down for one! :angry:

 

Me too David!

As an ex-professional (the Classical recording industry for over 20 years), lots of what has been said is absolutely spot on. In terms of title - what is wrong with The organ of Romsey Abbey?? It makes sense to me. The only reason why a title like that should be avoided is if you are hoping the "majors" like HMV and Virgin are going to stock it (if they did, it would end up under compilations and would not sell), but assuming most are going to be sold in the Abbey shop (does Jeremy Filsell work there - sorry, another post!), then "The Organ of Romsey Abbey" is good.

R

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If you want to include more detail than the booklet allows, how about posting it to a website - plenty of room for photos, biography, registration, blah blah blah ?

 

H

 

The recent 'Grand Chorus' set of CDs played on South London organs did this.

 

AJJ

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