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The New Organ In The Temple Du Bouclier, Strasbourg


Pierre Lauwers
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The organ was opened this year, and was designed after

what we know today about the organs Bach knew and played.

The builder is Dominique Thomas of Ster-Francorchamps (eastern Belgium)

 

HAUPTWERK

 

Quintadena 16'

Principal 8'

Viola di Gamba 8'

Gemshorn 8'

Rohrflöte 8'

Octava 4'

Spitzflöte 4'

Quinta 3' ( 2 2/3')

Octava 2'

Sesquialtera 2r 1' - 1 3/5'

Mixtur 3 or 4r (two positions for the knob: 3r without tierce, or 4r with 4/5' tierce). Lowest rank on C: 1 1/3'

Cymbeln 3r, lowest rank on C: 1/2'

Fagott 16'

Trompete 8'

 

HINTERWERK (also "division in the back", very common in Bach times instead of a RP)

 

Quintadena 8'

Bordun 8'

Salicional 8'

Traversflöte 8'

Flöte 8' (tuned in "Kammerton", 440 Hz)

Octava 4'

Flöte douce 4'

Rohrflöte 4' (tuned in "Kammerton", 440 Hz)

Spitzquinta 3' (2 2/3')

Octava 2'

Waldflöte 2'

Tertia 1 3/5'

Quinta 1 1/3'

Mixtur 3r, lowest rank on C: 1 1/3'

Vox humana 8'

Cymbelstern

 

PEDAL

 

Principalbass 16' (wood)

Violonbass 16'

Subbass 16'

Violabass 8' (from HPTW)

Gemshornbass 8' (HPTW)

Rohrflöte 8' (HPTW)

Octavbass 8'

Octavbass 4'

Posaunbass 16'

Fagottbass 16' (HPTW)

Trompete 8'

 

The borrowings are made after the "wandering stops" design, which means they are available

either on the HPTW, either on the Pedal. This system allows for a more stable tuning than

a borrowing stricto Sensu.

 

Pierre

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The organ was opened this year, and was designed after

what we know today about the organs Bach knew and played.

The builder is Dominique Thomas of Ster-Francorchamps (eastern Belgium)

 

HAUPTWERK

 

Quintadena 16'

Principal 8'

Viola di Gamba 8'

Gemshorn 8'

Rohrflöte 8'

Octava 4'

Spitzflöte 4'

Quinta 3' ( 2 2/3')

Octava 2'

Sesquialtera 2r 1' - 1 3/5'

Mixtur 3 or 4r (two positions for the knob: 3r without tierce, or 4r with 4/5' tierce). Lowest rank on C: 1 1/3'

Cymbeln 3r, lowest rank on C: 1/2'

Fagott 16'

Trompete 8'

 

HINTERWERK (also "division in the back", very common in Bach times instead of a RP)

 

Quintadena 8'

Bordun 8'

Salicional 8'

Traversflöte 8'

Flöte 8' (tuned in "Kammerton", 440 Hz)

Octava 4'

Flöte douce 4'

Rohrflöte 4' (tuned in "Kammerton", 440 Hz)

Spitzquinta 3' (2 2/3')

Octava 2'

Waldflöte 2'

Tertia 1 3/5'

Quinta 1 1/3'

Mixtur 3r, lowest rank on C: 1 1/3'

Vox humana 8'

Cymbelstern

 

PEDAL

 

Principalbass 16' (wood)

Violonbass 16'

Subbass 16'

Violabass 8' (from HPTW)

Gemshornbass 8' (HPTW)

Rohrflöte 8' (HPTW)

Octavbass 8'

Octavbass 4'

Posaunbass 16'

Fagottbass 16' (HPTW)

Trompete 8'

 

The borrowings are made after the "wandering stops" design, which means they are available

either on the HPTW, either on the Pedal. This system allows for a more stable tuning than

a borrowing stricto Sensu.

 

Pierre

 

 

=====================

 

 

 

It looks all right, but couldn't they afford a proper pedal organ?

 

MM

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Seems to be a nice layout, even with the borrowings. If it sounds well, too, it should be a nice and expressive instrument. I like the optional third of the mixture. And I agree with Pierre that the Pedal division is sufficient from the Bach point of view, and more would be a move towards North Germany indeed (though, if it would have been affordable, it might have been a gain).

The proper acoustic projection of a Hinterwerk depends on the building. E. g., the caseless Oberwerk of the Hamburg Jacobi Schnitger projects perfectly via the archs of the vault and strikes all arguments one can hear in "Orgelbaukunde" about the need of a case for a really good organ (You all know so many other examples).

Is there an audio sample available on the web already?

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I hope this link will work:

 

http://i17.servimg.com/u/f17/11/52/27/37/p1020210.jpg

 

An ancient case without RP also, and sufficient room behind.

According to historic examples, the HIW is higher than the OW,

close to the ceiling, and without a roof.

There are no recordings available yet, but no panic, I shall

communicate the first ones here.

 

Pierre

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I hope this link will work:

 

http://i17.servimg.com/u/f17/11/52/27/37/p1020210.jpg

 

An ancient case without RP also, and sufficient room behind.

According to historic examples, the HIW is higher than the OW,

close to the ceiling, and without a roof.

There are no recordings available yet, but no panic, I shall

communicate the first ones here.

Looks lovely, merci, Pierre. Is there much room for the other musicians in the gallery (for whom I imagine the Kammerton stops are provided)?

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Looks lovely, merci, Pierre. Is there much room for the other musicians in the gallery (for whom I imagine the Kammerton stops are provided)?

 

Of course there is, and you see the chairs at the right of the pictures.

You can arrange for the Bach Cantates there...

 

Pierre

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Bach's organs had nothing more (often only 16-8-16), and also with borrowings.

Do we need an hybrid Buxtehude/bach Pedal ?

Pierre

 

Whilst this is indeed true of some of the instruments with which Bach was associated, that at Mülhausen was rather more complete.

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