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That looks a dream of a double-decker; lucky organist!

 

http://npor.emma.cam.ac.uk/cgi-bin/Rsearch...ec_index=E00139

I was organist there for about three years. For around £30,000, we got a pretty good instrument.

 

The G.O. reed unit is fairly 'English' - but powerful. It speaks on a pressure of 150mm and stands behind the north front (the metal Pedal Open Diapason 16ft). However, as the rank descends to the Pedal octave (Bombarde), I had it voiced full out with open shallotts. The result is a powerful quasi-French Bombarde which rips around the church in a reasonably lively acoustic. Fortunately, the voicer (Don Wherly) was superb and there is an extremely good match between the 16ft. octave and the bass of the G.O. Orchestral Trumpet.

 

If we had been given greater resources, I would have liked to change both mixtures; the G.O. III rank still stings a little - it is the standard Osmond 19-22-26. I had it smoothed out a little. The Swell mixture I had re-pitched, an octave higher than formerly. It is better than it was (previously, its addition to anything other than foundation stops was virtually imperceptible). Again, with more money, I should have swapped the Larigot for a Voix Humaine. As it was, we had to replace the Cornpean from C13 up, since the old stop was unsuccessful - and would not revoice satisfactorily.

 

The swell box is huge and I saw some space at the back whilst it was being dismantled and asked the builder for a quote to extend the Swell Bass Trumpet down to 32ft. pitch, for use on the Pedal Organ, since the stop was already borrowed on this division at 16ft. Initially he said that there would not be room. However, when the organ was being re-installed, he mentioned to me that there probably would have been room. I wish that I had pushed for this, since a 32ft. reed under expression would have been an impressive finishing touch.

 

Incidentally, the G.O.Tierce is of course pitched at 1 3/5ft.

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And, though, it is recognized today (click on "read more" with the fugue) the Link organ

in Giengen is firmly grounded in the baroque tradition, in this case the southern one.

It is actually more "baroque" than any neo-baroque organ.

 

Pierre

 

Well this is fair enough but, whilst is is of course a subjective matter, the proof of the pudding is in the eating, as is said. I just thought that the sound was heavy, unclear and the tierce mixtures to give a reediness which I found wearisome.

 

I agree with Vox that this prelude needs a grand treatment. However, for me this was not successful.

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I was organist there for about three years. For around £30,000, we got a pretty good instrument.

 

The G.O. reed unit is fairly 'English' - but powerful. It speaks on a pressure of 150mm and stands behind the north front (the metal Pedal Open Diapason 16ft). However, as the rank descends to the Pedal octave (Bombarde), I had it voiced full out with open shallotts. The result is a powerful quasi-French Bombarde which rips around the church in a reasonably lively acoustic. Fortunately, the voicer (Don Wherly) was superb and there is an extremely good match between the 16ft. octave and the bass of the G.O. Orchestral Trumpet.

 

If we had been given greater resources, I would have liked to change both mixtures; the G.O. III rank still stings a little - it is the standard Osmond 19-22-26. I had it smoothed out a little. The Swell mixture I had re-pitched, an octave higher than formerly. It is better than it was (previously, its addition to anything other than foundation stops was virtually imperceptible). Again, with more money, I should have swapped the Larigot for a Voix Humaine. As it was, we had to replace the Cornpean from C13 up, since the old stop was unsuccessful - and would not revoice satisfactorily.

 

The swell box is huge and I saw some space at the back whilst it was being dismantled and asked the builder for a quote to extend the Swell Bass Trumpet down to 32ft. pitch, for use on the Pedal Organ, since the stop was already borrowed on this division at 16ft. Initially he said that there would not be room. However, when the organ was being re-installed, he mentioned to me that there probably would have been room. I wish that I had pushed for this, since a 32ft. reed under expression would have been an impressive finishing touch.

 

Incidentally, the G.O.Tierce is of course pitched at 1 3/5ft.

 

Thank you for the detail. I imagine that there are very few instruments with fewer than 4 manuals that have received such attention.

 

I rarely get to that part of the world but it's on the list for a visit should the opportunity occur.

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Thank you for the detail. I imagine that there are very few instruments with fewer than 4 manuals that have received such attention.

 

I rarely get to that part of the world but it's on the list for a visit should the opportunity occur.

 

I am sure that you would be welcome. The Director of Music is a friend and colleague.

 

I even spent a weekend producing full-size drawings of the new console layout (which I measured during a sermon, to the vicar's puzzlement).

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I am sure that you would be welcome. The Director of Music is a friend and colleague.

 

I even spent a weekend producing full-size drawings of the new console layout (which I measured during a sermon, to the vicar's puzzlement).

 

The church is worth a visit too.

 

AJJ

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http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x5Z8goeFzzQ...feature=related

 

...of James Lancelot at St. Sulpice (with Daniel Roth assisting and advising - look out at 5.18!), is great!

 

P

Knowing James Lancelot for many years now, it seems amazing he let anyone record the vierne, I know he is not too keen on having recordings made, I know this from asking him a few times recently if I could record hime at Durham and other venues

Peter

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The 1950 Walter Holtkamp organ of Syracuse (NY) with Reger:

 

http://hk.youtube.com/watch?v=DqdOfXb2M1M&...feature=related

 

Pierre

 

(I hold Walter Holtkamp as one of the more significant builders in the history

of the organ during the 20th century, despite his relatively limited output.

Victor Gonzalez was actually quite well informed about him!)

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The 1950 Walter Holtkamp organ of Syracuse (NY) with Reger:

 

http://hk.youtube.com/watch?v=DqdOfXb2M1M&...feature=related

 

Pierre

 

(I hold Walter Holtkamp as one of the more significant builders in the history

of the organ during the 20th century, despite his relatively limited output.

Victor Gonzalez was actually quite well informed about him!)

 

This is interesting, Pierre. There are some beautiful sounds on this instrument - the strings in particular are most restful. The choruses are good, although there seems to be a slight mis-tuning here and there.

 

A good ensemble, since there is no casework to aid cohesion and focus to the sound.

 

Good playing, too.

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http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x5Z8goeFzzQ...feature=related

 

...of James Lancelot at St. Sulpice (with Daniel Roth assisting and advising - look out at 5.18!), is great!

 

P

 

I found this one too fast and lacking in grandeur for my taste. The early Cochereau recording (around 1955-56) at Nôtre-Dame has a much better feel for this movement.

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I don't think anybody has mentioned this one yet, but with so many postings I cannot be sure. Here is a brief tour of the restored RAH pipe chambers by our host's own Mr. Leslie Ross.

 

I'm not quite sure why there was so much noise when the blowers were turned on; It almost sounds like a novice piper trying to strike in. Perhaps the people filming asked for some notes to be played to convey the concept of the instrument warming up?

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  • 3 weeks later...
Well, the contrast with
couldn't be greater, could it? ;)

Oh but such majesty, and those perfectly placed rhythmic accents! Actually, with its 'cathedral' sobriquet in the UK I suspect GTB might have played the little E minor at a similar stately tempo.

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What goes around comes around: GTB playing Bach like he was driving a Bugatti, long before Virgil, Carlo and Cameron, complete with party horns!

Wasn't the story with this recording that the equipment in those days could only record about 7 minutes at a time so GTB had to play it very fast to fit in within the confines of the technology of the time? Somebody more knowledgeable about historic recording equipment than me would know.

 

Also notice the complete lack of acoustic in the BBC recording hall at the end of the recording.

 

I'm a little reminded of Gordon Reynolds when listening to this: "always allow full swell to creep in and obscure the last 2 pages of a Bach fugue. This will not only impress your listeners but also save you a lot of practice." However, it's a wonderful document of the tastes of the time & GTB's prodigious ability.

 

Here's GTB playing his own Elegy:

 

http://uk.youtube.com/watch?v=9RyGq_kb-I8&...feature=related

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Wasn't the story with this recording that the equipment in those days could only record about 7 minutes at a time so GTB had to play it very fast to fit in within the confines of the technology of the time?

Hmm, not so sure. GTB's clearly utterly convinced by that tempo, and throws the organ around with such confidence that it convinces the audience (well, me, anyway!). Wouldn't he have chosen a shorter, slower piece if the constraints of 78s had to be considered?

 

Incidentally, how bright the Great 2 foots sound on all those recordings, even over the roaring full Swell.

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Oh but such majesty, and those perfectly placed rhythmic accents! Actually, with its 'cathedral' sobriquet in the UK I suspect GTB might have played the little E minor at a similar stately tempo.

 

I agree. The trenchant sound of those wonderful reeds is superb in this lovely building.

 

Somewhere, I have an old LP of Dr. Lenough Anderson playing (amongst other things) this piece at a recorded 'recital' on the organ of the RFH. As far as I can remember, he too adopts a stately pace - and plays it on tutti reeds and foundations (i.e. without all the bright mixtures). However, I have not listened to it for many years, so I could be mis-remembering the details.

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