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How about this then. 'Certainly different!!

 

A

 

 

................Ooooer - there are more!!!

 

................and how does one get one's front pipes to light up in time to the music like these do?

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Lastly, here is another clip from an organ that I don't think has featured in this topic so far.

 

The organ in this clip is that of Roskilde Cathedral, Denmark (3 manuals, 33 stops). Original organ by Raphaelis of the Netherlands (1554, of which the gallery, positiv case, 2 positiv ranks & 2 Manualvaerk ranks survive) and rebuilt by Johann Lorentz (completed Mülisch, 1654) and Marcussen & Reuter (1833). The organ was restored in 1991 by Marcussen who used notes made before the 1833 rebuild to determine the old specification and mixture compositions which were reinstated. The gallery structure was also restored in 1991 at the same time and this allowed reinstatement of the original layout of the winding and action. Lastly, "all the work, from hammered metal and correct alloy for the pipes to the detail of the console, has been carried out enturely in the traiditons of the original work".

 

Around 1/3 of the pipework is from the 1500s and 1600s. Great sounding instrument on which I would love an hour or two!

 

D. Buxtehude: Praeambulum in A minor BuxWV 158 (played by Ulrik Spang-Hanssen):

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3AR9tbmPj6Y

 

Pictures:

http://www.flickr.com/search/?w=all&q=...rgan&m=text

 

Enjoy!

 

Dave

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That grand organ the 5 manual one that JG was playing - sounds like something of of the ACC period, or by ACC himself. Would I be correct in that assumption?

It's Guillou's own organ at St Eustache. It's a Van den Heuvel from 1989, using only a few stops from the previous Ducroquet instrument (though these few stops do apparently include a Willis Corno di Bassetto).

http://vandenheuvel-orgelbouw.nl/instrumen...et_eustache.htm

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SCOOOOP!!!!

 

For the first time -and since only a few days ago- there is an anthem of Samuel-Sebastian Wesley on Youtube:

 

 

When do Britain follow, please ?

USA: 10 points !

 

S-S Wesley's music is one which reach such depths as to be qualified philosophical.

It would have even the bricks to pray!

 

Pierre

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Does anyone know details of the intervention that the Ducroquet organ suffered during 'the disastrous rebuild' of the late '70s?

 

I think possibly that the firm concerned went bust mid flow so to speak - somewhere I have the spec. that it would have had if this work had been completed - 'not sure where it is but it was decidedly bizzare. It was printed in a past edition of The American Organist. I also read somewhere that Jean Guillou actually had very little input into the most recent work.

 

A

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...Jean Guillou actually had very little input into the most recent work.

A

I'd read this also. However, could this have been a consequence of the situation regarding the ownership of/responsibility for the upkeep of organs in French Catholic churches, rather than a comment on Jean Guillou's tonal ideals?

Of course, he is known for holding unorthodox views on this subject. One can imagine that there might be something of a conflict between the needs of the liturgy/standard repertoire and the needs of an avant-garde composer when (re)designing an organ.

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I'd read this also. However, could this have been a consequence of the situation regarding the ownership of/responsibility for the upkeep of organs in French Catholic churches, rather than a comment on Jean Guillou's tonal ideals?

Of course, he is known for holding unorthodox views on this subject. One can imagine that there might be something of a conflict between the needs of the liturgy/standard repertoire and the needs of an avant-garde composer when (re)designing an organ.

 

 

You are probably right..........and Jean Louis Coignet - the Expert Organier to Paris was quite capable of coming up with schemes that were interesting if needs be too!

 

A

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...Jean Guillou actually had very little input into the most recent work.

 

I heard Jean Guillou say this in person. He seemed to be a little miffed that everyone presumes that he designed it, possibly because he makes it sound so 'Guillou' when he plays it. He also spoke of the many 'wasted' stops, those that were not colourful/characteristic enough for him.

He's an amazing character and love or hate his compositions, arrangements and performances, you can't help admiring him.

 

P.

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He's an amazing character and love or hate his compositions, arrangements and performances, you can't help admiring him.

 

P.

 

 

And he has some pretty amazing students/followers/assistants too - some of us on here heard this player recently - her 'repertoire' pieces were as staggeringly interpreted as her transcriptions. The Toccata from Ravel's Tombeau de Couperin had me stunned. A few present got decidedly 'snotty' about it but there was masses of musicianship, an outstanding technique and the right organ handled with taste.

 

A

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And he has some pretty amazing students/followers/assistants too - some of us on here heard this player recently - her 'repertoire' pieces were as staggeringly interpreted as her transcriptions. The Toccata from Ravel's Tombeau de Couperin had me stunned. A few present got decidedly 'snotty' about it but there was masses of musicianship, an outstanding technique and the right organ handled with taste.

 

A

 

Absolutely. I've heard her play the whole of Ravel's Tombeau de Couperin at St Eustache, from memory too!! :)

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Fine memories of your visits to France, guys !

 

And here one of mines, a feeling of what I enjoyed in Britain in the 70's:

 

 

(Certainly worth Saint-Eustache!)

 

Pierre

 

 

Nice one here Pierre - I lived and worked close to Worcester in the early 80s and used to drop in too!

 

A

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Nice one here Pierre - I lived and worked close to Worcester in the early 80s and used to drop in too!

 

A

 

Me too, though quite a bit later than the 80s, and I've been trying to face spot, without any success.

 

Anyone recognise the organist, and is that a female I spotted under Hunt's left arm on the back row at 'Jerusalem is builded', or was it just a hangover from the long hair of the 1970s.

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Absolutely. I've heard her play the whole of Ravel's Tombeau de Couperin at St Eustache, from memory too!! :P

 

Now that's something I would really like to hear.

I love Ravel's piano music and have done this suite on the piano over the last couple of years, but not finished the Toccata; it's relentless!

Ravel didn't orchestrate the Fugue and Toccata, and I just can't envisage Toccata on the organ at all. Thomas Trotter plays his version of the suite, but I think only the 4 orchestrated pieces.

Are you aware of any organ recordings of it?

 

DT

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Now that's something I would really like to hear.

 

Are you aware of any organ recordings of it?

 

DT

 

 

Yanka Hekimova doesn't seem to have recorded it - when we were there we got the Minuet and the Toccata - as with the rest - all from memory and quite spellbinding. She also played the 1st movement of Mozart's Jupiter Symphony (hear on her website) which was equally amazing. It all sounded completely convinving on that organ and there were none of the weird harmonics or stranger small reeds in action - simply a huge variety of flutes, strings, chorus work and 'big' reed sounds.

 

A

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Fine memories of your visits to France, guys !

 

And here one of mines, a feeling of what I enjoyed in Britain in the 70's:

 

 

(Certainly worth Saint-Eustache!)

 

Pierre

But the boys are all so SHARP (apart from the final top B flat)! Perhaps because there was so hot air from the squeezebox three inches behind them... :P

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Yanka Hekimova doesn't seem to have recorded it - when we were there we got the Minuet and the Toccata - as with the rest - all from memory and quite spellbinding. She also played the 1st movement of Mozart's Jupiter Symphony (hear on her website) which was equally amazing. It all sounded completely convinving on that organ and there were none of the weird harmonics or stranger small reeds in action - simply a huge variety of flutes, strings, chorus work and 'big' reed sounds.

 

A

She is an astonishingly fine musician.

 

My abiding memory of that organ (apart from the life-changing experience of driving Vierne Messe Solennelle and Vierne VI Final on it) is hearing Bernard Haas playing his transcription of Stravinsky's Rite of Spring in concert. Afterwards, with quiet modesty, he explained how his first version of the work was too hard, so he had to redo it. It still sounded (at the very least) like a duet. Incredible.

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But the boys are all so SHARP (apart from the final top B flat)! Perhaps because there was so hot air from the squeezebox three inches behind them... :P

 

 

....A Squeeze(swell)box they needed a week to destroy! :P:lol: :lol:

 

Pierre

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