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Thank you for posting that link. It was fascinating to see and hear PC talking and to see the original console at ND de P in use.

A part from the former console , one can see him at his private organ which was located in his (big) flat of boulevard Berthier in Paris.

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A part from the former console , one can see him at his private organ which was located in his (big) flat of boulevard Berthier in Paris.

 

Indeed, some of the pipework of which is now present in the organ of Église Saint-Vincent de Roquevaire as played by David Briggs on the new CD (Hommage a Cochereau) highlighted elsewhere on the forum. DB's track is the only one of the four on the CD which I have played more than once..

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is nice!

 

Thanks for that Alastair. It led me on to this utterly magnificent find:

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cUrKul2sNbU

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iHzc32nozRY

 

Make sure to watch them in high quality. I don't think I've ever heard Reger this well played on such a stunning organ. Excellent recording too - well, as far as it'll go on Youtube...

 

In case you're wondering what it is, it's Heinz Wunderlich playing the Reger Fantasie and Fugue on BACH on the Berlin Dom organ. :rolleyes:

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Fantastic BWV 582 played by Olli Porthan (much-admired Professor of Organ at the Sibelius Academy in Helsinki) on the magnum opus of his brother, Martti Porthan in the church of Kotka in South East Finland. I played a concert on this organ in 02 - it is a copy of the famous Freiberg Silbermann (note the clever re-interpretation of the Freiberg case to match the surroundings of the typically late-19th century Scandinavian church). The organ is a class act, it even feels like the real thing.

 

Bazuin

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Fantastic BWV 582 played by Olli Porthan (much-admired Professor of Organ at the Sibelius Academy in Helsinki) on the magnum opus of his brother, Martti Porthan in the church of Kotka in South East Finland. I played a concert on this organ in 02 - it is a copy of the famous Freiberg Silbermann (note the clever re-interpretation of the Freiberg case to match the surroundings of the typically late-19th century Scandinavian church). The organ is a class act, it even feels like the real thing.

 

Bazuin

 

 

I like it!

 

A

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Am I the only one to notice that in that clip of John Scott playing 543 he shows a remarkable physical resemblance to Elton John? OK, I'll get my coat.

Rory Bremner, I've always thought...

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is nice!

 

A

 

I do not know of one interpretation of the BWV 443 that I like, and this one,

though efforts towards something different than the usual neo-baroque recipes,

is no exception.

The attempts to provide life ends up with instable tempi, and the fugue is still

two times too fast.

The registration is extremely well conceived, with some variations, and avoiding

to use mixtures all the time. This goes in an interesting direction. But I would prefer

another organ for Bach. They have the "Saunders" now in the U.S. (the Casparini copy),

they should use it first would any attempt to a reference interpretation be made in Bach.

 

This interpretation of the Liszt's piano transcription deserves interest; I think this could

be interesting for organists:

 

 

Pierre

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Regarding John Scott's BWV 543:

 

"The attempts to provide life ends up with instable tempi, and the fugue is still

two times too fast."

 

I was astonished at the, for me beautiful, expression in the Prelude, I would never have associated this kind of playing with John Scott. I agree about the fugue - Bach could have written 'Allegro', he didn't.

 

"The registration is extremely well conceived, with some variations, and avoiding

to use mixtures all the time. This goes in an interesting direction."

 

I would like Pierre to publish his ideas about Bach registrations, because he obviously has a completely different idea about the use of the middle-German baroque organ, and his ideas stem from first-hand experiences! Can you refer us to some articles, Pierre? I am very interested to read about your ideas!

 

"But I would prefer

another organ for Bach. They have the "Saunders" now in the U.S. (the Casparini copy),

they should use it first would any attempt to a reference interpretation be made in Bach."

 

I understand your sentiment, but does the Casparini copy disqualify the obviously Northern German-leaning New York T and B as a valid Bach organ? I don't think so.

 

Listening to the mixtures in the Fugue reminded me of the (for me) strange idea of Harald Vogel that Buxtehude et al used reeds in polyphony and mixtures in non-polyphony. Here I think the mixtures aid the polyphony, despite the Schnitger-style organ.

 

Great film, gorgeous organ!

 

Bazuin

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There is no need for scholar articles; whenever one hears a Trost organ,

or a Wagner organ (already mid-way between northern an central german), it is

obvious their mixtures aren't intended to be imponed upon the public for more

than a few minutes at a time, even with a full church.

 

Bach and northern organs; Bach did not travel that much. While studying in Lüneburg,

he heard a Niehoff organ Schnitger ranked like Worcester's was in 2006, that is, just

good enough for the scrapyard. Later he happened to hear and play one or two Schnitgers,

and that was it. He played central german organs 99,9% of his lifetime.

 

The idea "he would have preffered the northern stuff" is 150% a neo-baroque one; an idea

that, if taken over, allows us to pretend whatever we want.

 

Franck, for instance, as from Gemmenich origin (a frontier village with a dialect close to mine's),

could have preffered a western german romantic organ, say a Stahlhuth, a pupil of Merklin while

in Brussels, and whose workshop was in the Aachen area. Or a Peereboom & Leyser (pupils of

Hyppolite Loret) from Maastricht.

 

De Grigny would surely have preffered to be played on a Le Picard organ (Liège), because

this family of builders still build after the 1690 french manner up to the end of the 18th century...

 

....And so I earn Franck and Grigny back in my backyard in three sentences, just by borrowing

the way of the neo-baroque tribe.

 

Halas this is not serious...At all.

 

"Listening to the mixtures in the Fugue reminded me of the (for me) strange idea of Harald Vogel that Buxtehude et al used reeds in polyphony and mixtures in non-polyphony."

(Quote)

 

This is not so strange, if one remembers the northern german organ and the french baroque organ share

the same origin, that is, the brabanter organ.

And both share a particularity: they have quint mixtures.

These are NOT used for the polyphony in the french organ, with which fugues are played on the

reeds.

Bright, quite "free toned" reeds are to be found in northern organs as well.

Mr Vogel also wrote the big Schnitger mixtures, along with the powerfull Pedal basses,

are intended to acompany congregationnal singing -which fills precisely the gap at 8'-.

 

The french organ has virtually no Pedal save a 8' Trompette, but this one had not

to acompany any singing at all.

 

Pierre

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  • 2 weeks later...
Now there's a thought - I wonder how something like that would go down at my place just before the notices! It might add a little spice to the whereabouts of the coffee morning or whatever.

 

AJJ

 

That rerminds me of something Gordon Reynolds wrote, to the effect that some church organists secretly covet theatre organ add-ons, so they could then reinforce profound statements in the sermon with a distant roll of thunder or add birdsong effects to the notice about the next Mothers' Union meeting. :lol:

 

Peter

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But with a bit more 8' tone, I hope! :lol:

 

 

Of course Vox - OD 8, SD 8, VdG 8, Pr 4, 15th 2, Oboe 8 plus truncated 16' with trigger swell set to open - all courtesy of Mr Vowles sent the good people on their way with the sun shining on the lake and the Temple of Apollo above!!

 

A

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This is not from Youtube, but, nevertheless, an interesting MP3 featuring

the Walcker organ of the Klosterkirche in Murrhardt (D), built 1977 under the

direction of Helmut Bornefeld.

This is a typical Neo-baroque Diapason chorus, the kind of which we have

some hundreds in Belgium today -Helmut Bornefeld has had much followers

here up to the end of the 80's-

Hear for yourself:

 

http://blog.walckerorgel.de/__oneclick_upl.../track-no02.mp3

 

Pierre

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