Jump to content
Mander Organs
Justadad

Youtube

Recommended Posts

No, the recording's crap; you can even hear this in her spoken introduction. I wouldn't judge the organ from this.

Incidentally, I loved one of the comments posted below the video: "I wished I were the organist at the church. Its possible that she didn't tune the organ very good. There is usually a dial on the side."

 

I would concede that playing Nun danket on an unequal temperament organ was probably not a good idea.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
And for those who have not yet experienced Feike Asma's eye-popping performance of Widor's Toccata:

 

 

Hmmm....

 

Notes left out, wrong notes, clipped notes, several changes of speed....

 

OK - so we slowed down in the middle. Oh no, now it is faster. Another clipped note....

 

Ah, he may have just remembered that he has another engagement and is about to be late.

 

Bleah - the facial close-up was a bit much.

 

Ah, another few mistakes.

 

Probably a heavy action.

 

Why the hell would anyone play the crossed hands part on the same clavier (if one was playing an instrument with more than one, that is) ?

 

Actually I was also checking out my farm on facebook and the animal noises on the soundtrack lent an interesting dimension to this 'rending' of the Widor Toccata * - particularly the chicken clucking directly after the last chord....

 

So - what was wrong with it again?

 

 

He seems to have very lively hair - even more so than Joanna MacGregor....

 

* That was the piece he was playing - yes?

 

B)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Going back to the interesting stuff now, there is this

video which illustrates Pierre Schyven's masterpiece in Antwerp's Cathedral:

 

 

Note the Mixtures; this organ, in original conditions, dates 1891, and still

has those bright Quint Mixtures Pierre Schyven ever built, even in small

instruments. The tone is even not forced with that, so that they are perfectly

usable without the reeds !

Pierre Schyven's voicing was rather milder than with the french builders.

Trained with Josef Merklin in Brussels, his style is just between the french

and the german ones. The Antwerp's organ has several rare free-reed stops.

 

Pierre

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Going back to the interesting stuff now, there is this

video which illustrates Pierre Schyven's masterpiece in Antwerp's Cathedral:

 

 

Note the Mixtures; this organ, in original conditions, dates 1891, and still

has those bright Quint Mixtures Pierre Schyven ever built, even in small

instruments. The tone is even not forced with that, so that they are perfectly

usable without the reeds !

Pierre Schyven's voicing was rather milder than with the french builders.

Trained with Josef Merklin in Brussels, his style is just between the french

and the german ones. The Antwerp's organ has several rare free-reed stops.

 

Pierre

 

Indeed, Pierre. This is a superb instrument. I had the privilege of playing for two masses on it a few years ago. A wonderful sound, in a beautiful building.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Bach by André Isoir at Weingarten:

 

 

Mind the Tierces!

 

Pierre

 

The D natural at 6'.38" was a bit of a surprise - presumably not the Novello edition, then....

 

An interesting clip, Pierre - thank you. I have not heard this instrument beofre, and the sound was quite different to that which I expected. Having said that, I am not sure what I thought it would sound like. It is a reedy sound, but this seemed to suit this particular piece no less that the recording of Vierne playing it (apparently) on the tutti at Nôtre-Dame de Paris.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here is the specifications of the Weingarten Oberwerk Mixture:

 

Weingarten, Gabler 1750, Mixtur 9-12 rangs de l'Oberwerk:

 

C: 4'- 2 2/3'- 2'- 1 3/5'- 1 1/3'- 1'- 4/5'- 2/3'- 1/2'

 

c: 4'- 2 2/3'- 2'- 1 3/5'- 1 1/3'- 1'- 1'- 4/5'- 2/3'- 2/3'- 1/2'- 1/2'

 

c1: 5 1/3'- 4'- 3 1/5'- 2 2/3'- 2'- 2'- 1 3/5'- 1 3/5'- 1 1/3'- 1 1/3'- 1'- 1'

 

c2: 6 2/5'- 5 1/3'- 5 1/3'- 4'- 4'- 3 1/5'- 3 1/5'- 2 2/3'- 2 2/3'- 2'- 2'

 

.....So the sound is rather predictable.

 

Pierre

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Here is the specifications of the Weingarten Oberwerk Mixture:

 

Weingarten, Gabler 1750, Mixtur 9-12 rangs de l'Oberwerk:

 

C: 4'- 2 2/3'- 2'- 1 3/5'- 1 1/3'- 1'- 4/5'- 2/3'- 1/2'

 

c: 4'- 2 2/3'- 2'- 1 3/5'- 1 1/3'- 1'- 1'- 4/5'- 2/3'- 2/3'- 1/2'- 1/2'

 

c1: 5 1/3'- 4'- 3 1/5'- 2 2/3'- 2'- 2'- 1 3/5'- 1 3/5'- 1 1/3'- 1 1/3'- 1'- 1'

 

c2: 6 2/5'- 5 1/3'- 5 1/3'- 4'- 4'- 3 1/5'- 3 1/5'- 2 2/3'- 2 2/3'- 2'- 2'

 

.....So the sound is rather predictable.

 

Pierre

 

Indeed.

 

Thank you for this, Pierre.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Hmmm....

 

Notes left out, wrong notes, clipped notes, several changes of speed....

 

OK - so we slowed down in the middle. Oh no, now it is faster. Another clipped note....

 

Ah, he may have just remembered that he has another engagement and is about to be late.

 

Bleah - the facial close-up was a bit much.

 

Ah, another few mistakes.

 

Probably a heavy action.

 

Why the hell would anyone play the crossed hands part on the same clavier (if one was playing an instrument with more than one, that is) ?

 

Actually I was also checking out my farm on facebook and the animal noises on the soundtrack lent an interesting dimension to this 'rending' of the Widor Toccata * - particularly the chicken clucking directly after the last chord....

 

So - what was wrong with it again?

 

 

He seems to have very lively hair - even more so than Joanna MacGregor....

 

* That was the piece he was playing - yes?

 

<_<

 

Here is an alternative video of a similar piece; scroll down to the fourth screen...

 

 

P

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

intro for (French) kids. Some very effective jazz Aubertinique at 2'27"! Cool model at 5'. And a visit chez Aubertin at 7'30", continued in 2nd
. Even a brief blast from the Vertus 32' reed - well worth watching. Back to Paris in the
for a tour of St Louis' colours. "Le plein jeu...c'est la signature de l'orgue" I like her!! A brief plug for St John's College, Oxford too, towards the end of clip 3. Enjoy!

 

Can't help thinking that by the middle of the 2nd clip, makers of programmes for British youth would be worried they'd have lost concentration. Such a shame: this is a brilliant lesson in physics and engineering. Nice not to have distracting pop music in the background too. We even get that in 'serious' science/nature progammes for grown-ups in the UK...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I watched Part 1, and yes, what a good programme. What sort of programme is it taken from in France? A kids/teenage show, a music show, or a 'technology' show? My French isn't that great, but I was amused (if my translating is correct) that the first player is introduced as an 'organist and a musician', what greater compliment can there be!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@Organist12345 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sbGjBt3X4qk...feature=related

 

It's the youtube comments I liked.

 

Apparently it was tuned in "so-called unequal temperature"

 

An alternative theory suggests that "maybe she didn't tune the organ very good. There is usually a dial on the side".

 

It really is a truly amazing sound.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Slightly off our brief I know, but
has been doing the rounds for some time and is a worthwhile diversion...

These two guys are hysterical.

and
are brilliantly silly

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Slightly off our brief I know, but
has been doing the rounds for some time and is a worthwhile diversion...
These two guys are hysterical.
and
are brilliantly silly

 

 

Very funny :D There's a Bill Bailey atmosphere about these videos.

 

 

Welcome to the forums Rohrflöte!

 

 

 

EC

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I just found this video on Graham Barber's website.

It illustrates the fabulous Diapason chorus of the Armley

Schulze organ:

 

http://www.grahambarber.org.uk/videos/high.mpg

 

Souvenirs, souvenirs ! but no video can convey the gigantesque

effect this monumental Plenum gives in Situ.

 

Pierre

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Incidentally, I loved one of the comments posted below the video: "I wished I were the organist at the church. Its possible that she didn't tune the organ very good. There is usually a dial on the side."

:lol:

 

And the one which said 'It's not out of tune, but tuned in a so called unequal temperature'. The temperature sounds like it fluctuated every few minutes whilst it was being tuned! :D

 

As Vox observed, why play 'Nun Danket' on an organ tuned to an unequal temperament? B)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Though the "modern" organ tends to resemble them more and more,

the "néo-classique" organs are out of fashion; they are "wrong", and will

soon be nearly all disposed of in the years to come if we do nothing

to protect them. Round and round....Etc.

 

But those organs reveal themselves, thrive with the music that was written

in their own period. And here is an excellent example:

 

 

The organ is a 1973 Gonzalez, specifications by André Marchal.

 

Pierre

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Though the "modern" organ tends to resemble them more and more,

the "néo-classique" organs are out of fashion; they are "wrong", and will

soon be nearly all disposed of in the years to come if we do nothing

to protect them. Round and round....Etc.

 

But those organs reveal themselves, thrive with the music that was written

in their own period. And here is an excellent example:

 

 

The organ is a 1973 Gonzalez, specifications by André Marchal.

 

Pierre

Absolutely. Here are a couple of other examples, on the nearest an English builder got to Chartres, by Messiaen and Bolcom. And even fairly convincing colours IMHO in music written a tad earlier: de Grigny

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Absolutely. Here are a couple of other examples, on the nearest an English builder got to Chartres, by Messiaen and Bolcom. And even fairly convincing colours IMHO in music written a tad earlier: de Grigny

 

Yes, Iann. But Chartres did not replace a Mutin -or, for that matter, a 1929 Rinckenbach, or

anything else of the same kind-.

(I do not mean no Gonzalez replaced historic organs, quite to the contrary!)

 

Pierre

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Yes, Iann. But Chartres did not replace a Mutin -or, for that matter, a 1929 Rinckenbach, or

anything else of the same kind-.

(I do not mean no Gonzalez replaced historic organs, quite to the contrary!)

 

Pierre

Of course, and I make no comment about the instrument HNB/Downes/Sanders replaced (let's not go there again! :blink: ) But I would ask, in light of your suggestion the best of the néos should be protected, should we discard the Gloucester organ and recreate what was lost? And, when did néo-classique become néo-romantique in the UK? (St John's Cambridge? Tonbridge School? Christchurch Priory? Edinburgh RC Cathedral? Jesus Cambridge? Worcester? Llandaff?)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I would certainly keep the Gloucester organ as it is. Why add another execution ?

We would just continue with the same game...

What I would do would be, perhaps, to commission H&H to build a "Howells organ"

nearby, whenever the occasion arises.

 

As for Grigny, I prefer this one:

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rxPooeWo64k

 

....Note the date -1698-. de Grigny's organ wasn't Dom Bédos, rather

end 17th century organs, still with flemish influence, whose last representative

was maybye Jean de Joyeuse -his Auch masterpiece was destroyed by Gonzalez-

towards 1700.

As we had in Liège, Belgium, the Le Picard dynasty of french organ-builders,

who settled there precisely towards that time, and built 17th-century french organs

up to near to the end of the 18th century, we do have interesting organs for

de Grigny in Belgium.

Compared with Dom Bedos, Isnard's and Clicquot's late baroque french organs,

those have lighter wind, nervous reeds -as illustrated in the video in this post-,

more polyphonic "Plein-jeu" AND......Often, a somewhat narrow Tierce, which could

go with.....Guess what !

(The belgian baroque organ, even those belonging to the Le Picard school, very often

have at least one Sesquialtera).

 

"Neo-romantic" ? I'd talk rather about "inverted neo-classical". While the first

"néo-classique" organs were largely post-romantic organs in search of some mutations,

some Quint Mixtures (after Dupré's model for "ancient" mixtures, that is, french ones),

we now have néo-baroque designs in search of some celestes, one swellbox, one Flûte

harmonique added to a "baroque" great...

It is not difficult to find the first Voix céleste (or equivalent) to come back after the complete

withdrawal of such stops round 1980.

 

Pierre

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
As for Grigny, I prefer this one:

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rxPooeWo64k

 

Pierre

 

Of course! Nothing beats the real thing :blink:

 

Interesting stuff about les Picards.

 

"Inverted neo..." Goodness. What knots we tie ourselves with such categories. I understand what you mean though. A flute harmonique or an enclosed brustwerk does not a romantic organ make!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Please sign in to comment

You will be able to leave a comment after signing in



Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...