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Hello!

 

This recording was indeed made by Heinz Wunderlich at the Tzschöckel-organ at Schwäbisch Hall. The recording is available at organum classics.

 

Regards

Karsten

 

=============================

 

 

I'll second Pierre's thanks for this information. What a fine organ, and of course, the playing is magnificent, as one would expect from Heinz Wunderlich.

 

I think it must now be 45 years ago (when I was 15), that I recognised his wonderful ability and his truly great interpretations of Reger.

 

MM

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Hello!

I was so lucky to be in Berlin, when Heinz Wunderlich gave a Recital at Berlin Cathedral in 2005. He played Bach's Prelude and Fugue in E minor, Mendelssohns 6th Sonata, Reger's 2nd Sonata and his one "Sonata tremolanda Hiroshima". In spite of the beginning of the Bach (many wrong notes, but he was in his 80s already) it was one of the most thrilling live performances I have heard.

It must be said that Wunderlich's (or better: Straube's) Reger interpretations are more and more critizised and questioned, especially in Germany.

 

Regards

Karsten

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.....And not only in Germany. It seems Straube had another kind

of organ in mind than the german one when he laid his registrations out,

especially in the ppp, where he used systematically the swellbox

while the german organ of the period provided splendid soft stops

aplenty....

 

Pierre

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Now here is something a little bit special. I have often mentioned the magnificent organ built by Michael Engler for the church of St Moritz, Olomouc, in the Czech Republic, but just about every available clip or sound file is of poor quality.

 

Imagine my delight to discover a splendid visual tour of the church on YouTube, with a performance on the Olomouc instrument of the "Great" G Minor by Bach.

 

As you enjoy this visual and musical treat, you may be opuzzled by the two organ consoles; one of which is a five-manual, electric-action console (Rieger Kloss), and the other, the original Engler console with beaitiful inlay and detailed carving. BOTH consoles operate, but the Engler organ had short compass pedals. When the organ was enlarged by Rieger-Kloss, it is said that all the original Engler pipework was left untouched, and in fact still operates from the mechanical action console. With great skill, I think, Rieger-Kloss grafted a lot of new pipework to blend with the old, and the end result is quite magnificent when the instrument is played as rebuilt and in its entirety.

 

I suspect that, for this recording, the stops chosen are the original Engler ones, and what a fine sound it is.

 

Enjoy this while you can, because there is talk of taking the organ back to its original Engler state. I hope that doesn't result in the destruction of what is a wonderfully all-embracing instrument, even though it would make the historians happy.

 

 

Thew following two clips demonstrate the entire organ admirably, played by the very pretty and very effective young Czech organist, Katerina Chrobokova:-

 

 

 

 

 

MM

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This is amazing, or how amazing is this?

 

There's playing Bach the right way, and playing Bach the wrong way, but it seems that there is also playing Bach the Bach way.

 

It might be interesting to do a Bach to Bach comparison, or even a simulcast of Bach and Bach Bach, but before (or after) you are all completely confused/enlightened, here is an astonishing (electronic) performance of Bach played Bachwards.

 

 

 

:angry:

 

MM

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A nice piece of playing here: Scott Dettra (Principal Organist, Washington National Cathedral, USA) playing William Walton's "Crown Imperial" on the organ of the WNC. Very fine it sounds too IMO.

 

 

Dave

 

 

=========================

 

It's a great pity that the compression is kicking-in-and-out in this clip, which destroys the full impact of this magnificent (and deeply unfashionable) Skinner instrument.

 

While listening to this great instrument, you may wish to consider the sadness of an old man, Ernest Skinner, who then aged perhaps 90 or so, went to an organ convention somewhere in America. Apparently, he was largely ignored by most of the people there.

 

MM

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I'm not easily stunned by either a performer or an organ, but for once, I am stunned!

 

http://www.jan-esra-kuhl.de/horbeispiele/

 

Click on 'Hörbeispiele' and listen to an improvisation with a difference, and then the Durufle Toccata played superbly.

 

What an organ the German one is!!!!!!! There are other examples on YouTube played by Jan Esra-Kuhl, and all are worth watching.

 

This is muscianship right to the finger-tips.

 

MM

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=========================

 

It's a great pity that the compression is kicking-in-and-out in this clip, which destroys the full impact of this magnificent (and deeply unfashionable) Skinner instrument.

 

MM

 

There is a CD of Gerre Hancock improvising and playing some Bach at Washington NC (JAV label I think) - fantastic playing and some superb sounds both in broadly 'symphonic' and French classical styles.

 

A

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  • 2 weeks later...

Now here's a little bit of English joy to share, even if the music is "Aux Francais."

 

When you listen to this, you can't help but wonder where it all went so wrong after the turn of the century, because this is one of the finest organs I have heard and played.

 

 

MM

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Now here's a little bit of English joy to share, even if the music is "Aux Francais."

 

When you listen to this, you can't help but wonder where it all went so wrong after the turn of the century, because this is one of the finest organs I have heard and played.

 

 

MM

 

Everyone seems to be walking in through the door and down the nave since John Scott Whiteley set the trend!

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Everyone seems to be walking in through the door and down the nave since John Scott Whiteley set the trend!

 

 

======================

 

I noticed that too, but only John forgot to pick his coat up again after playing an organ somewhere in Germany. I love continuity gaffs.

 

MM

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  • 2 weeks later...

The legendary recording of the "Messe à quatre voix" Opus 4 from Camille Saint-Saëns

in Worcester, 1979, is now available on Youtube:

 

http://il.youtube.com/watch?v=FuLu3CsdK0Q&...&feature=BF

 

The Kyrie:

 

http://il.youtube.com/watch?v=VZOD-qcMQAk&...&feature=BF

 

The Sanctus:

 

http://il.youtube.com/watch?v=P08bFAZN0_0&...&feature=BF

 

O Salutaris:

 

http://il.youtube.com/watch?v=oARhMfvIEnI&...&feature=BF

 

Agnus Dei:

 

http://il.youtube.com/watch?v=FuLu3CsdK0Q&...&feature=BF

 

(Halas the MP3 does not justice to the splendid organ it was at that time).

 

Pierre

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There's plenty (?) of music written for just the feet, but usually it's intended to be played on the pedalboard.

 

This takes some beating...

 

 

...which just goes to show that even if you lose both arms in an accident you can still continue to play the piano.

Of course, you don't even have to be human to play the piano!

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I've just uploaded a batch of Harmonium recordings to You Tube. These are live recordings from a concert earlier this year. Unfortunately, the quality of the mic, and the automatic level control in the camcorder compromise the sound to some degree, and being a live recording, there are the odd "noises off" - and a few wrong notes! Enjoy. The links are below:-

 

 

Every Blessing

 

Tony

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