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A superb post-romantic german organ -with a Fernwerk- from 1911,

carefully restored in two times, 1984 and 1995:

 

 

Pierre

 

 

Thanks, a wonderful track!

[i'll have to find a copy.]

 

Rather comical to see (4 minutes in) what would appear to be a complete manual division of fluework all arranged en chamade.

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As we discussed on the french forum, we discovered that at 3 ' 20", there is a view of six

pipes of the heavy-wind Jubal Flöte; a square, wooden pipe with two mouths.

 

You can read the Specifications of the organ here by scrolling down the central window:

 

http://christuskirche.org/?orgel_steinmeyer

 

Pierre

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A new Scoop this one: "The" Bach Toccata at the J. Wagner organ of Angermünde,

and with a good quality:

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m8A07eFGB-c

 

THAT is a baroque sound!!!

 

Pierre

 

Unfortunately yet another interpretation where the organist didn't understand that the stress in the first (and the third) phrase of the piece isn't - in my humble opinion - on the penultimate (lowest), but on the last note (a semitone higner). Or am I the only one to see that the former note is still a part of the second beat and the latter is already on the (stressed) third beat ...? Or doesn't the theory of "good" and "bad" beats in Baroque music matter with this kind of "free style" composition? Without having researched this forum, whether the interpretation of the beginning of BWV 565 has already been thoroughly discussed here, I wonder, how everyone else is playing this.

 

The sound of the organ is awesome, thoguh, no question of that.

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Unfortunately yet another interpretation where the organist didn't understand that the stress in the first (and the third) phrase of the piece isn't - in my humble opinion - on the penultimate (lowest), but on the last note (a semitone higner). Or am I the only one to see that the former note is still a part of the second beat and the latter is already on the (stressed) third beat ...? Or doesn't the theory of "good" and "bad" beats in Baroque music matter with this kind of "free style" composition? Without having researched this forum, whether the interpretation of the beginning of BWV 565 has already been thoroughly discussed here, I wonder, how everyone else is playing this.

 

The sound of the organ is awesome, thoguh, no question of that.

To me it sounds as though the organist is absolutely placing the stress on the last note of the first and third phrases with an agogic accent to boot! On an instrument with no control over dynamics within a phrase the main way of placing an accent on the PENultimate note would be to lift off the previous note and on this recording I can't detect any gap between the ante- and the pen-ultimate notes.

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To me it sounds as though the organist is absolutely placing the stress on the last note of the first and third phrases with an agogic accent to boot! On an instrument with no control over dynamics within a phrase the main way of placing an accent on the PENultimate note would be to lift off the previous note and on this recording I can't detect any gap between the ante- and the pen-ultimate notes.

 

After listening to the recording once again, I can see what you mean. I don't agree completely, though. It is perfectly clear that - in order to place an accent on a note - the only means of doing that on the organ is to make the previous note a bit shorter. With this particular recording, however, it seems to me that the pause between c# and d is almost too long, which - in my ears - disturbes the rhythm and somehow accentuates both notes. It almost sounds to me as if the c# was on the beat, despite the fact that there is no obvious detachment before it and that the c# is played almost staccato. There are of course a number of other interpretations out there (also on Youtube), which I find far more disturbing. Then again, it probably isn't the intention of this thread to start any in depth interpretation discussions (although it seems that this is exactly what I've done ...).

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A Bach fugue on the 1906 Gebrüder Link organ of Giengen-an-der Brenz:

 

 

An incredibly polyphonic Post-romantic organ, which colors do not differ widely

from those of a Trost organ...

 

Pierre

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Here is something to put a smile on your face:

 

The Opera Company of Philadelphia assembled a flash mob to sing the Hallelujah Chorus in the Macy's Grand Court last weekend, similar to their "Flash Brindisi" earlier this year in Philadelphia's Reading Terminal Market. It looks like great fun, and my, doesn't the organ sound wonderful.

 

Justin (hat tip to my aunt)

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Here is something to put a smile on your face:

 

The Opera Company of Philadelphia assembled a flash mob to sing the Hallelujah Chorus in the Macy's Grand Court last weekend, similar to their "Flash Brindisi" earlier this year in Philadelphia's Reading Terminal Market. It looks like great fun, and my, doesn't the organ sound wonderful.

 

Justin (hat tip to my aunt)

 

'Will try it next weekend in Sainsburys!

 

A

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Here is something to put a smile on your face:

 

The Opera Company of Philadelphia assembled a flash mob to sing the Hallelujah Chorus in the Macy's Grand Court last weekend, similar to their "Flash Brindisi" earlier this year in Philadelphia's Reading Terminal Market. It looks like great fun, and my, doesn't the organ sound wonderful.

 

Justin (hat tip to my aunt)

 

=================

 

"Only in America!"

 

One may think this, but I found myself incredibly moved by this act of random culture. I remember being similarly awed by a youth jazz band in Quincy Market, Boston, Mass., when a group of kids just gave it everything and lit up my life for an hour or so, and brought utter delight to "random shoppers."

 

I just love the idea of classical folks getting out into the community, and showing that it isn't quite so stuffy as people think, and one of the best way, (possibly THE best way), is a performance from Handel's "Messiah."

 

Some years ago, a theatre organ group were given the opportunity of installing a theatre-organ in a large shopping centre in the North of England, but because they couldn't charge to hear concerts, the idea was rejected.

 

That was possibly the biggest mistake ever!

 

If only person in a thousand donated a pound, it would have brought in funds far faster than a monthly concert, and more importantly, shown people what the organ could do.

 

Somehow, I just can't help wondering if someone like Carlo Curley couldn't do the same thing with the touring organ in the middle of a market town in somewhere like Shropshire; especially if it involved local musicians and singers.

 

I bet the shoppers at Macy's will remember that day for the rest of their lives, and indeed, doesn't the organ sound glorious?

 

MM

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I don't normally have much time for transcriptions, but I found the poise here quite enchanting - and, for me, the speed is absolutely perfect. Nice sounding organ too.

 

 

And some Langlais on the same organ.

 

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There are builders, and organs, from the 1950's, deserving fully the title of

"historic organs"; among them, there are the instruments built by Walter Holtkamp Sr

in the U.S.

 

Here is his 1957 organ in Christ Church Cathedral (OH):

 

 

Second video:

 

 

And here is a picture of the façade (Case? Which case ?)

 

http://homepage.mac.com/klugpro/ccorgan/gr...ns/CCfacade.jpg

 

There has been nothing more modern since then, we still wait for the next step.

 

Pierre

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St Botolph Aldgate organ. Warning: hazardous for neo-baroque ears!!!

 

 

Another authentically restored organ (there are three videos, automatically following):

 

 

Enjoy the music boxes !

 

Pierre

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St Botolph Aldgate organ. Warning: hazardous for neo-baroque ears!!!

 

This is Psalm 150 (anonymous English organ piece, c.1680) played by Timothy Roberts. Does anyone know where the score is published?

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A premiere: The Victor Gonzalez organ of the Soissons Cathedral

is now illustrated by no less than twelve videos:

 

 

(This is only one of them, do not forget the 11 others)

 

Pierre

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