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This doesn't suggest that the monarchs were all that remote from music, and I suspect that at the top level, music was a way of squirming one's way into high-society.....always as a servant of course.

 

After all, the great musicians were invariably employed and supported either by monarchs or religious prelates, from the 13th Century to quite modern times. Remnants of that same patronage continue into the present day; not least in cathedral music.

Naturally. Monarchs were more or less obliged to indulge in "conspicuous consumption" in order to demonstrate their status visually to the wider world. In the Middle Ages the noblity (both temporal and spiritual) also maintained their own households for the same reason and it has been argued that the British church choir owes its genesis around the 1460s to precisely such considerations - the need to "put on a show".

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Back to the serious things, here is another interesting thuringian

organ -not a Trost, a Rommel-:

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KG5y6s1ufhU

 

This another sound we need to learn to live with before we can appreciate.

But this is what Bach had on hand, in a vast country then without cheep planes

and Autobahnen.....

 

Other video with the same organ:

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JYTR1ib6zrM...feature=related

 

(By the way, as the Spec is given, note the mandatory Traversflöte is well present; one may suppose

Rommel escaped the garrow that way. Had he not done so, the course of the 20th century might

have changed somewhat, as a potential grand-grand-grand-grand son would'nt have seen

the Tobrouk area...)

 

Pierre

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Back to the serious things, here is another interesting thuringian

organ -not a Trost, a Rommel-:

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KG5y6s1ufhU

 

This another sound we need to learn to live with before we can appreciate.

But this is what Bach had on hand, in a vast country then without cheep planes

and Autobahnen.....

 

Other video with the same organ:

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JYTR1ib6zrM...feature=related

 

(By the way, as the Spec is given, note the mandatory Traversflöte is well present; one may suppose

Rommel escaped the garrow that way. Had he not done so, the course of the 20th century might

have changed somewhat, as a potential grand-grand-grand-grand son would'nt have seen

the Tobrouk area...)

 

Pierre

 

 

================================

 

 

Traverse Flute or not, this is an organ I could live with for this sort of repertoire. At least, it doesn't sound as if it were voiced by someone who suffered from severe hearing and mental problems.

 

Oddly enough, I thought immediately that the organ might be built like a tank when I saw the name of the builder.

 

Rommell the tank man certainly earned the respect of the allies.

 

MM

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The choir of Coventry Cathedral, c.1988, deliver the Coventry Carol accompanied by the (I'm guessing) inclusive music group.

 

There are other clips in the same account (notyobs) that you might find interesting.

 

Best wishes

 

barry

 

Daniel Roth - St Sulpice - Marcel Dupre http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vjqbee8cRyw

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The choir of Coventry Cathedral, c.1988, deliver the Coventry Carol accompanied by the (I'm guessing) inclusive music group.

 

There are other clips in the same account (notyobs) that you might find interesting.

 

Best wishes

 

barry

 

Another Daniel Roth - St Sulpice - Marcel Dupre http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9X6cZfy9uR0

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Dear All,

 

I came across a small series of Youtube clips on the 1511 Van Covelens organ of the Grote Sint Laurenskerk, Alkmaar. This organ celebrates its 500th birthday this year, celebrations of which will be held during the Orgelfestival Holland in June (more details at ww.alkmaarorgelstad.nl). I also understand there is to be an article on this organ in a future publication of Choir & Organ (I hope).

 

Until then, more information on the organ can be found at http://www.orgelsite.nl/kerken39/alkmaar1.htm. I should point out that the Holpyp, Openfluyt and Sufflet on the Hoofwerk are on a chest above the Hoofwerk soundboard, feed by tubes from the Hoofwerk soundboard below (vaguely similar to a mounted cornet, I suppose), as a precursor to the Bovenwerk.

 

Scheidemann:

 

Buxtehude:

 

Merula:

(the 1/4 comma meantone temperament is thrown into sharp relief here!)

 

Kees van Unen:

(the magical Doof is heard alone at about 2:00).

 

Hopefully these clips give an idea of this remarkable organ and its properties.

 

(Thank you to Pierre, whose link on Facebook alerted me to these recordings).

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The "Amalien-Orgel", which was built for the Princess of the same name,

now in Karlshorst-Berlin, has been recently restored; it is an important

historic organ, built by pupils of the great Master Joachim Wagner

(whom I personally rate higher as G. Silbermann).

 

The first videos appeared on Youtube Today:

 

 

 

See here the Website of the organ:

 

http://www.amalien-orgel.de/index.php

 

Pierre

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  • 3 weeks later...
Dear All,

 

I came across a small series of Youtube clips on the 1511 Van Covelens organ of the Grote Sint Laurenskerk, Alkmaar. This organ celebrates its 500th birthday this year, celebrations of which will be held during the Orgelfestival Holland in June (more details at ww.alkmaarorgelstad.nl). I also understand there is to be an article on this organ in a future publication of Choir & Organ (I hope).

 

Until then, more information on the organ can be found at http://www.orgelsite.nl/kerken39/alkmaar1.htm. I should point out that the Holpyp, Openfluyt and Sufflet on the Hoofwerk are on a chest above the Hoofwerk soundboard, feed by tubes from the Hoofwerk soundboard below (vaguely similar to a mounted cornet, I suppose), as a precursor to the Bovenwerk.

 

Scheidemann:

 

Buxtehude:

 

Merula:

(the 1/4 comma meantone temperament is thrown into sharp relief here!)

 

Kees van Unen:

(the magical Doof is heard alone at about 2:00).

 

Hopefully these clips give an idea of this remarkable organ and its properties.

Colin,

 

Thanks for posting those links and the videos. I had never heard this organ and it sounds really good. What a pity I fear that I might not make it to the organ festival to mark this instrument's 500th. I hope there is an article on it in C&O in the future and I am surprised that there hasn't been one in C&O before now. But, as far as I can tell, there hasn't been one (I have all the C&O editions that there ever have been, excluding Issue 2).

 

Dave

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I don't know if this has been posted already, but
performance of the Johnson Trumpet Tune in A at St.Eustache is quite impressive. Nice to hear it played at a more stately tempo than is often heard.

 

 

It's a strange thing, but one of the things I remember most clearly from the Organ Club's visit to Paris in about 1975 was Andre Fleury at St-Eustache - on the old organ....

 

I see that the Johnson was played as part of a master-class with Yanka Hekimova - now she is a stunningly good organist. We had her at Belfast Cathedral twice and she was amazing. The first concert, in particular, was the best I have ever heard on that organ - or anywhere else in Ireland come to that.

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It's a strange thing, but one of the things I remember most clearly from the Organ Club's visit to Paris in about 1975 was Andre Fleury at St-Eustache - on the old organ....

 

I see that the Johnson was played as part of a master-class with Yanka Hekimova - now she is a stunningly good organist. We had her at Belfast Cathedral twice and she was amazing. The first concert, in particular, was the best I have ever heard on that organ - or anywhere else in Ireland come to that.

 

 

USOC (Ulster Society of Organists & Choirmasters for those of you not from these parts!) did a trip to Paris in 2006. I also found ST-Eustache quite memorable for the NEW organ and Yanka's playing although it was obvious who her teacher was seeing her there and play in his style on his organ! Luckily the old man wasnt about and we got to play it!

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Thought these might be of interest. I am not sure if the first two videos have been linked in from this forum before: apologies if they have.

 

Firstly, the organ of Sion, Switzerland built approx. 1370 making it the oldest playable organ in the world, with additions later on. Diane Bish is the organist here. Both parts equally interesting IMO.

 

Part 1:

Part 2:

 

Second up is the organ of St. Andreas, Soest-Ostönnen, Germany. Nice sounding instrument originally built 1425 - 1430 for another church but transferred to its present home by Johann Patroclus Möller in 1722 who also revised it. Of the original pipe compliment of this organ about 3/4 of the pipes (about 326 in total) are from 1425 - 1430. The music in this clip is from the Buxheim Orgelbuch which dates from c. 1460.

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7pptw_heq10

 

HTIOI,

Dave

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