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"Hope This Is Of Interest"?

It's a fairly easily deducible extension of HTH (hope this helps) which has been a standard Usenet abbreviation for years, possibly pre-dating LOL. LOL.

 

Google is very useful for things like this.

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"Hope This Is Of Interest"?

It's a fairly easily deducible extension of HTH (hope this helps) which has been a standard Usenet abbreviation for years, possibly pre-dating LOL. LOL.

 

Google is very useful for things like this.

 

Thanks to both for this. I am not a member of the texting generation and have also not come across HTH before! I gather LOL has two meanings; Lots of Laughs and Laugh out Loud.

PJW

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Oh dear! Not what it was under Scotty and certainly nowhere near St Barry's high standards!

 

The microphones (to me) sound terribly close, and as anyone with any recording skills know, that can make an excellent choir sound quite the opposite.

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Thanks to both for this. I am not a member of the texting generation and have also not come across HTH before! I gather LOL has two meanings; Lots of Laughs and Laugh out Loud.

PJW

 

I thought it meant 'little old lady'!

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Thanks to both for this. I am not a member of the texting generation and have also not come across HTH before! I gather LOL has two meanings; Lots of Laughs and Laugh out Loud.

PJW

LOL stands for Laughing Out Loud, and its extended form ROTFLMAO stands for Rolling On The Floor Laughing My A** Off. But many "newbies" think LOL stands for Lots Of Love as in "Your grandma's just died LOL".

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LOL stands for Laughing Out Loud, and its extended form ROTFLMAO stands for Rolling On The Floor Laughing My A** Off. But many "newbies" think LOL stands for Lots Of Love as in "Your grandma's just died LOL".

 

 

 

 

 

 

also lots of love !

Colin Richell

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St Barry's high standards!

 

 

I have confess that I have never come across anyone who by any remote stretch of the imagination could be called both "Saint" and "Barry". Now, Bruno, on the other hand, founded the Monastery of La Grande Chartreuse. Sounds a much more worthy cause for canonisation.

 

Malcolm

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St Barry's high standards!

 

 

 

I have confess that I have never come across anyone who by any remote stretch of the imagination could be called both "Saint" and "Barry". Now, Bruno, on the other hand, founded the Monastery of La Grande Chartreuse. Sounds a much more worthy cause for canonisation.

 

Malcolm

 

Oh dear! I was given to understand that "Barry" was derived from St Finbarr. Anyway, hats off to St Bruno, the founder of the magnificent Carthusian monastery of La Grande Chartreuse.

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Just came across this clip and it is most certainly worth a listen.

 

Maxime Patel playing the organ in the basilica at Waldsassen, Germany. The piece is the Jeanne Demessieux "Te Deum".

 

The organ was built 1982 - 1989 by Georg Jann but the casework looks older. THere are 6 manuals, 103 stops and 7720 pipes making it one of the largest in Germany. There are 9 divisions on this organ (7 manual, 2 pedal) and two consoles. Great playing by Patel who, until I saw this clip, I had never heard in action.

 

Photos:

- http://www.flickr.com/photos/64479867@N00/3454692821/ (Organ)

- http://www.flickr.com/photos/64479867@N00/3455496956/ (Organ)

- http://www.flickr.com/photos/91551562@N00/2232208851/ (Church)

 

This organ has a bit of a growl to it which reminds me of Notre Dame, Paris. Enjoy!

 

Dave

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Maxime Patel - This is an extract from a DVD where he plays the complete Demessieux. Readily available and thoroughly recommended.

Thanks for the lead. Do you have the info (title, where I can get it, etc.) for the DVD? I have just run a search on Amazon to no avail.

 

Thanks.

Dave

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  • 3 weeks later...
  • 3 weeks later...

 

 

==================================

 

 

This is absolutely fantastic!

 

Xaver Varnus seems to have a good eye for the unusual and the unusually entertaining, and judging by the audience response, it went down well.

 

I can't but feel slightly envious of musicians in Hungary, because there seems to be genuine appreciation for classical music, with the organ playing a full and prominent part, as it should do. Furthermore, the organ is not regarded as an exclusively religious instrument, but one capable of being centre stage in good concert halls, while in America and England, that seems no longer to be the case. That is probably fortunate, because I understand that the churches and cathedrals pay nothing or very lttle there.

 

As things are revealed, I have an increasing respect for Dezső Antalffy-Zsiross as both comnposer and arranger. Of coure, the boellman has been arranged for brass in England, and is a regular feature at brass band concerts, so there's no excuse for not enjoying a similar combined performance here.

 

MM

 

PS: Pity the sound recording is a bit iffy, with compression kicking in and out to dire effect.

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This one is fun, especially for those of us who were hooked on David Munrow recordings and other rude renaissance raspberries.

 

 

 

=============================

 

That's as good as the 16ft Laukhof reed in the organ I play....all from bits of tubing and plastic bottles!

 

Humph.......

 

MM

 

PS: At least we have a future......

 

 

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Having heard a piece by Judith Weir this afternoon (what was all that about??) and the start of Brian's big noise this evening, I couldn't take any more and one wonders why they can't do something like this at the Proms, wonderful stuff.

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  • 1 month later...

Here are some recordings of the Van Eeken organ at the Norderkerk in Rijssen, played by the church organist, Jan-Geert Heuvelman.

 

Improvisation on Psalm 85 (4 variations): http://youtu.be/rUip9MaOT7w

Improvisation on Psalm 96 (8 variations):

(this is a playlist - after each clip, the website should go onto the next verse after a brief pause).

 

I was very lucky indeed to visit this organ earlier this year (the church is ultra-orthodox and access to visit the organ is not easy). Due to the nature of the church, it is highly unlikely there will be commercial recordings of this organ, or even organ recitals.

 

This organ was built really with one purpose - to accompany the congregation of 2,000 in their singing of iso-rhythmic psalms acording to the Dutch Psalter. Its strength of purpose is immense: it is one of the most uncompromising and the least compromised organ I have ever come across and it is possible to trace every element of this organ to its purpose and, further on, to the church's purpose of the glory of God. It seems incredible this organ was finished in 2005.

 

More details here: http://www.henkvaneeken.com/completedprojects/Rijssen.html

 

I've heard the organ at the Meiji Gakuin University in Japan is even more incredible: http://www.henkvaneeken.com/completedproje...eijiGakuin.html

 

At Rijssen, one is very aware of the strong differentiations between the manual divisions - the Rugwerk is sharp and sweet, the Manuaal rich and grand. The reeds are incredible, with remarkable body and nearly no harmonic development on the Manuaal Trompets. In Japan I understand van Eeken has developed the concepts even further, with different vowel characteristics of the principals as they develop from bass to treble and between divisions. His organs are in a league of their own...

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Having heard a piece by Judith Weir this afternoon (what was all that about??) and the start of Brian's big noise this evening, I couldn't take any more and one wonders why they can't do something like this at the Proms, wonderful stuff.

Sorry if you didn't enjoy it, but just for the record you've got the wrong Judith. Judith Bingham wrote the piece (The Everlasting Crown) I played on Sunday 17th: Judith Weir wrote the opening piece in the First Night. You'll have to ask Roger Wright about programming issues.

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Here are some recordings of the Van Eeken organ at the Norderkerk in Rijssen

 

This organ was built really with one purpose - to accompany the congregation of 2,000 in their singing of iso-rhythmic psalms acording to the Dutch Psalter. Its strength of purpose is immense: it is one of the most uncompromising and the least compromised organ I have ever come across and it is possible to trace every element of this organ to its purpose and, further on, to the church's purpose of the glory of God.

 

The article in the most recent Organists' Review about this builders very new organ in Holy Trinity Crosshaven in S. Ireland and how it has altered ways of performing music in the liturgy is fascinating too.

 

A

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