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The article in the most recent Organists' Review about this builders very new organ in Holy Trinity Crosshaven in S. Ireland and how it has altered ways of performing music in the liturgy is fascinating too.

 

A

Yes - very good article I thought. You get to hear Jan-Geert do the double pedal thing (tune in right foot on the Trumpet, bass with left foot) in the Fugues at the end of the partitas - he usually uses the approaches Mark Duley outlines in his article when playing psalms in services - he gave a demonstration of iso-rhythmic Dutch Geneva Psalter accompaniment (where we participated by singing) when we visited. Mighty impressive stuff. If you get the chance to go to Crosshaven, do go - it'll be an extraordinary organ.

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Yes - very good article I thought. You get to hear Jan-Geert do the double pedal thing (tune in right foot on the Trumpet, bass with left foot) in the Fugues at the end of the partitas - he usually uses the approaches Mark Duley outlines in his article when playing psalms in services - he gave a demonstration of iso-rhythmic Dutch Geneva Psalter accompaniment (where we participated by singing) when we visited. Mighty impressive stuff. If you get the chance to go to Crosshaven, do go - it'll be an extraordinary organ.

 

..and this was interesting too, from the organbuilder's details about the Rijssen organ. The words of a former minister in 1937.

 

The service of the Word and of the sacraments must remain the only reason why one goes to church, and to which everything else is subservient. Together we go forward in love. Listen to the sermon more than to the organ.'

 

Now there's food for thought!

 

A

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Hans Peter Reiners – who presided for four decades over the large French-style Oberlinger organ at St. Joseph Bonn-Beuel and managed an incredible recital programme there, that included simply all of the names of modern French organ playing – has turned 65, and is now going to enjoy his live as a pensioneer. Some of you may know him. However, to celebrate this change, he managed to organise an high-level organ marathon (see here) that took place in Bonn-Beuel last sunday.

you may witness what three top-notch players and close friends of Hans Peter (along with a congregation of several hundreds) had to say about that – entirely enjoying themselves doing so.

 

Best,

Friedrich

 

(who wasn't there as he had to mind the baby, but is glad to have been given this URL)

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Oh Dear! It's bit like having a reality programme to make over your home. Some nice rich colours, but it is no longer the place you recognise or want to live in. Sorry, I hate it.

It's obviously played by heart – he takes a wrong turn at the end of the Allegro con fuoco and manages only just to go back on track. Same on the very last page of the score – with quite surprising results!

 

It's strange how many players jump into an Allegro which is just not there in b. 16, as Guillou does here – it is still Grave, nothing else is given. But I definitely love his rendering of the initial Grave – and the Bassoon-Sound he finds for the bass is just stunningly orchestral!

 

Best,

Friedrich

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Oh Dear! It's bit like having a reality programme to make over your home. Some nice rich colours, but it is no longer the place you recognise or want to live in. Sorry, I hate it.

 

========================

 

 

Guillou; ever interesting as always. It's a bit like listening to Koopman. You never quite know whether to listen or just throw things at the monitor.

 

At his best, Guillou could be quite persuasive and compelling, but this doesn't do a thing for me. It is far, far wilder than his "Ad nos" for instance, and that belongs in the same school of composition and style.

 

The late Graham Steed, on hearing the name Guillou brought up in conversation, turned to me and said, "Ah! You mean the crazy French one!"

 

That said, I find that there are great moments from Guillou, often when it is least expected.

 

MM

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.....I definitely love his rendering of the initial Grave – and the Bassoon-Sound he finds for the bass is just stunningly orchestral!

 

Best,

Friedrich

 

I completely agree. For the first fifteen bars, I thought we were going to hear something really special and exciting, then it just lost me completely.

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Here's an interesting one - Nocturne for an Orange in G flat by Porter Heaps. I dread to think what other fruit combinations one could use. Seriously (!) if anyone has a copy of the same composers Swinging Bach please could they PM.

 

A

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Here's an interesting one - Nocturne for an Orange in G flat by Porter Heaps. I dread to think what other fruit combinations one could use. Seriously (!) if anyone has a copy of the same composers Swinging Bach please could they PM.

 

A

 

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Groan alert!

 

I thought I heard a few inaccuracies in the middle segment.

 

Of course, being a halloween concert, it would have to be a Seville orange. That's the only one which sends Chivers down the spine.

 

Then there's this, which is absolutely brilliant fun.

 

 

Then there are people who are just bloody clever:-

 

 

MM

 

 

PS: I recall the late and great Bill Davies playing Chopin on the piano, with a tennis-ball held in his right fist. This was first done by a famous pianist at, I believe, the Savoy Hotel, when he used an orange. Unfortunately, the orange didn't withstand the punishment very well, and began to leak; temporarily wrecking the key-action of a perfectly good Bechstein, before the piano repairers could be brought in.

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Greetings all,

 

Didn't know if anyone would be interested, but I am doing some recording of an old Wangerin organ at the Madison Masonic center...

Last week I was doing some mic placement tests and recorded this little improv to show some of the sounds:

 

 

Monday I took the iPad for a walk to shoot some footage of the auditorium and chambers!

 

http://vimeo.com/30706668

 

I have to say this organ is equal of anything Skinner or Kimball produced in the same era - the sound is thrilling...

 

Enjoy!

 

G

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Greetings all,

 

Didn't know if anyone would be interested, but I am doing some recording of an old Wangerin organ at the Madison Masonic center...

Last week I was doing some mic placement tests and recorded this little improv to show some of the sounds:

 

 

Monday I took the iPad for a walk to shoot some footage of the auditorium and chambers!

 

http://vimeo.com/30706668

 

I have to say this organ is equal of anything Skinner or Kimball produced in the same era - the sound is thrilling...

 

Enjoy!

 

G

 

============================

 

 

Thanks for this Jonathan. I'd never heard of this builder.

 

You can certainly hear the quality of voicing, which seems to measure up to that from the other builders in the "Grand Style."

 

Another recent surprise was to hear a fine recording of the wonderful Midmer-Losh at Phoenix, Arizona......what an instrument that is!

 

These few remaining organs need to be preserved as they are.

 

MM

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============================

 

 

 

Another recent surprise was to hear a fine recording of the wonderful Midmer-Losh at Phoenix, Arizona......what an instrument that is!

 

These few remaining organs need to be preserved as they are.

 

MM

 

Here's another in good condition - check out the decidedly unusual spec. and the pictures to see the amazing long compass choir manual. The recording on Raven shows it off nicely. The organist there, Anthony Burke is also very obliging with info. etc.

 

A

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Greetings all,

 

Didn't know if anyone would be interested, but I am doing some recording of an old Wangerin organ at the Madison Masonic center...

Last week I was doing some mic placement tests and recorded this little improv to show some of the sounds:

 

 

Monday I took the iPad for a walk to shoot some footage of the auditorium and chambers!

 

http://vimeo.com/30706668

 

I have to say this organ is equal of anything Skinner or Kimball produced in the same era - the sound is thrilling...

 

Enjoy!

 

G

 

I note that this instrument has a slightly unusual stoplist - at least by English standards. Whilst there seem to be plenty of flutes and strings, the chorus structure is rather less well-developed. However, the G.O. does at least include (on paper) a chorus from Double Open Diapason to a 2ft. Principal. Having said this, I have no idea what type of music would normally be played on it; for that matter, I have no knowledge of the type of music which would be played in an English Masonic temple.

 

I note that there are apparently two sets of chimes and two harps - or are they borrowed? It appears that American organists seem to favour these percussion stops. I saw also that there is a 'floating' Echo Organ, with a similar stoplist to the old Altar Organ at Saint Paul's Cathedral, London. Well, apart from the lack of a Sylvestrina and the presence of a percussion stop, that is. *

 

It was interesting to have a tour around the inside of the instrument, Jonathan - thank you for that.

 

 

 

* I refer to a combination of the original stoplist of the Altar Organ, as completed in 1900, which did include a Vox Humana, and the section as altered in 1930 - 47, which did not - although it did have a Fern Flute.

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Henry Fairs playing Liszt's 'Ad Nos' fugue at St.Pauls, mayby a bit washy (that's for that 'special' stop called st.pauls), but d*mn what an organ it is!

Powerful playing too ...

 

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Henry Fairs playing Liszt's 'Ad Nos' fugue at St.Pauls, mayby a bit washy (that's for that 'special' stop called st.pauls), but d*mn what an organ it is!

Powerful playing too ...

 

Absolutely electrifying. A musician who plays with his ears. Loved it.

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4M T.C. Lewis at St Paul's Cathedral Melbourne.

 

 

but still ... for me David M. Patrick at Blackburn is the clear winner ;-)

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Absolutely electrifying. A musician who plays with his ears. Loved it.

 

 

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I don't like the "Ad nos" too much, but this is as good as it gets, and yes, from a m.u.s.i.c.i.a.n. rather than technician.

 

However, my favourite YouTube video has to be the one linked below, because I simply cannot think of anything more amusing.

 

Imagine you're playing a difficult work, on a very large strange organ in Paris, and you have Daniel Roth operating the ventils and turning the pages.......it is your worst nightmare!

 

I love Daniel Roth's schoolboy enthusiasm for all things organ and Cavaille-Coll in particular, and as a character study, this clip is priceless.

 

My hat off to the young organist who soldiered on regardless with what sounds, in spite of the recording quality, like a superb performance of the Dupre B Major.

 

 

The next one just the same, but this time there are two of them to distract the organist!

 

 

 

 

MM

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=============================

 

The next one just the same, but this time there are two of them to distract the organist!

 

 

 

 

MM

 

Not even Daniel Roth's 'singing', and then leaning right in front of him to pull a stop on the left jamb, managed to put him off!

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Not even Daniel Roth's 'singing', and then leaning right in front of him to pull a stop on the left jamb, managed to put him off!

 

 

==============================

 

The bit I love is in the first clip, where DR grabs the music-desk and waves it about; pointing out something to another chap who is presumably out of camera shot on the opposite side.

 

Registrands are supposed to be inconspicuous, but for me, they're the stars of the show in these clips....absolutely wonderful!! :lol:

 

MM

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Very much reminds of an exam I had to play in conservatory where my teacher was to turn pages; and so he did, in a long Buxtehude work turning a couple of pages too much not noticing it at first and then searching for the correct one. His remark, just 'huh, that was a bit huch -grin-' ; fortunately I had the piece enough in memory not to make mistakes, but it does get on the nerves ....

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The hymn "Zu Bethlehem Geboren" in Cologne Cathedral. Is this a Christmas hymn (could be, judging by the title) or one that can be sung at any time of year? Nice music anyway and the organ sounds in very fine fettle.

 

 

Dave

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