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Howells? You recorded your son playing Howells?

 

Have you no shame?

 

You expect me to listen to this?

 

If that isn't as good an argument as any for people carrying firearms, I don't know what is.

 

MM

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Howells? You recorded your son playing Howells?

 

Have you no shame?

 

You expect me to listen to this?

 

If that isn't as good an argument as any for people carrying firearms, I don't know what is.

 

MM

 

Hmmm - it must be right what they say about there being no civilised life between Watford and the Pentland Firth.....

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Hmmm - it must be right what they say about there being no civilised life between Watford and the Pentland Firth.....

 

===========================

 

 

Ha! I've watched "The only way is Essex." :ph34r:

 

Shakespeare was north of Watford of course, and we have Alan Bennett; not to mention "Last of the summer wine." .

 

Meanwhile, Manchester has "Take that" and Peter Kay :D .

 

MM

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===========================

 

 

Ha! I've watched "The only way is Essex." :ph34r:

 

Meanwhile, Manchester has "Take that" and Peter Kay :D .

 

MM

 

Boddington's Bitter used to be a fine drop, if I remember rightly, and Jennings.....

 

And I suppose there's a civilised enclave in Durham.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Picked this up from another forum. It's the 1902 version. It might surprise one or two. It did me.

 

 

 

-------------------------------------------

 

 

 

Wow!

 

What fantastic singing/accompaniment!

 

This version is completely unknown to me, but it is certainly effective.

 

MM

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Thanks for the link to Parry's autograph score, Vox. Does the erased pencil scrawl at the start say "Much too fast"? I thought the St Barnabas performance on the slow side but, for all I know, that's the "right" tempo. Maybe the Abbey and Coronations need a slower tempo than, say, a small village church.

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Thanks for the link to Parry's autograph score, Vox. Does the erased pencil scrawl at the start say "Much too fast"?

 

It does seem to - but in whose hand? - and there's no metronome marking... so...???

 

I thought the St Barnabas performance on the slow side but, for all I know, that's the "right" tempo. Maybe the Abbey and Coronations need a slower tempo than, say, a small village church.

 

That's a very good point. I'm not entirely sure the speed quite comes off in the rather dry acoustic of St Barnabas, but I imagine it might well in a large, resonant space such as the Abbey. The slower speed would certainly enable the sound to reach every nook and cranny of a vast building.

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I must admit I'm a little surprised this didn't evoke a few more comments, but maybe everyone else got there long before me and just rolled their eyes.

 

I hadn't thought about it, so it hadn't occurred to me how the "vivats" must have been tinkered with over the years. Parry did the 1902 and 1911 versions; Walford Davies did the 1936. Anyone know who did the 1953? Bax and Jacob have both been suggested.

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I have always felt that the vivats are a gross distortion of the piece, and that it must surely have been originally conceived without them (and having performed them once as a chorister, I felt the same then). I cringe when I hear them start.

 

The low-key opening of the 1902 version is curious, and I have to say that the new opening is far superior.

 

Paul

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I have always felt that the vivats are a gross distortion of the piece, and that it must surely have been originally conceived without them

 

This is because the text of the psalm (122) incorporates the acclamations "Vivat Regina...! Vivat Rex...!" with which the Queen's Scholars of Westminster School traditionally greet the entrance of the monarch at a coronation. This interpolation was a notable innovation at the time of its composition, but who's to say whether it was a brainwave on Parry's part or an idea suggested by someone else? If I remember correctly, Jeremy Dibble's edition for the RSCM (2002) gives Parry's 1902 version of the 'vivats' in the editorial notes - a useful template for the future.

 

I hadn't thought about it, so it hadn't occurred to me how the "vivats" must have been tinkered with over the years. Parry did the 1902 and 1911 versions; Walford Davies did the 1936. Anyone know who did the 1953? Bax and Jacob have both been suggested.

 

Parry biographer Professor Dibble thinks it was probably Gordon Jacob.

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This is because the text of the psalm (122) incorporates the acclamations "Vivat Regina...! Vivat Rex...!" with which the Queen's Scholars of Westminster School traditionally greet the entrance of the monarch at a coronation.

 

I remember hearing a recording of them doing this (it may well be available on Youtube, but I've not looked) and I distinctly remember the sound of youthful, broken voices. It has always seemed to me that, the vivats are likely to be more tellingly delivered in the tenor register than the treble. I can imagine the 1902 version coming off quite well in this way.

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  • 2 weeks later...

I just ran across this on YouTube:

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kxaqkd6eqqk&fmt=22

 

After many years of buying Priory CDs, I really must look into their DVD line. Hopefully they are region free, because I enjoyed this immensely!

 

I have all the Priory DVDs so far issued. Highly recommended. Order when first advertised (before issue) to save money.

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  • 1 month later...

Just found this - a whole concert from St.Bavo Haarlem. Olivier Latry plays Vierne and an interesting sonata movement by Jean-Pierre Leguay (I confess to not previously having heard any of his music - check out the terrific glissando at the end!). He is then joined by his partner Shin Young Lee in a transcription of Stravinsky's Rite of Spring. An hour well spent.

 

VA

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Thank you for this link. I've always admired this instrument, which sounds fantastic in the flesh. What a superb performance throughout.

 

It is really quite extraordinary that Haarlem can boast this quasi-French organ by Adema at the RC basilica of St Bavo, the peerless Muller at the other St Bavo, the Cavaille-Coll at the Concertegebouw, other smaller but very significant instruments and even a street organ museum. To have played four of these organs in one day was certainly an equally extraordinary day for me, and when I heard this performance, a lot of wonderful memories came flooding back, including time spent talking in a bar with Martin Haselbock.

 

Best,

 

MM

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Just found this - a whole concert from St.Bavo Haarlem. Olivier Latry plays Vierne and an interesting sonata movement by Jean-Pierre Leguay (I confess to not previously having heard any of his music - check out the terrific glissando at the end!). He is then joined by his partner Shin Young Lee in a transcription of Stravinsky's Rite of Spring. An hour well spent.

 

I was fortunate to have been in the audience at this performance which took place at the RC Basilica of St Bavo on 28 July. It was a memorable recital, and the church was full.

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I was fortunate to have been in the audience at this performance which took place at the RC Basilica of St Bavo on 28 July. It was a memorable recital, and the church was full.

 

...as they so often are in Holland and Germany. I do wish our recitals had the same support.

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I came across this in the related suggestions to the Latry Haarlem concert:

 

 

Olivier Latry takes part in a TV debate- 55 minutes of discussion (en Français, bien sûr) on KTO - who web-broadcast services from Notre Dame amongst their religious TV output- about contemporary music and religious music, including the role of organ improvisation.

For the French speakers amongst you, well worth watching.

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