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The first videos of Dr. Francis Jackson CBE (94) playing live are now on YouTube.

They were made at the end of Dr. Jackson's recital on 4 August at York Minster, after he went down from the regular console to the nave console and played there Chimes by Bernard Rose (from The Hovingham Sketches):

 

Published with kind permission of Banks Music Publications, Hovingham, copyright owner and publisher of the music.

The other one is Dr. Jackson's encore, Bach's Liebster Jesu, wir sind hier, after he had played Norman Cocker's Tuba Tune, in his own words, "to keep us from insanity":

 

.

 

Some very special moments after a memorable recital!

Gerco Schaap

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Pressed enter too soon....

 

 

 

And so often also are NOT; like John Scott playing in Amsterdam for +/- 20 persons :(

 

Hello,

It must be said that tourists don't easily find that church, organ lovers aren't very keen on the instrument, and the series is not well advertised.

In my own church opposite the Central Station, we averaged five times that number in this year's Summer series. Still not great, I know, but consider the organ overkill going on, not bad.

 

With the Haarlem Festival (whose closing concert by Latry was attended by the whole Summer Academy), Amsterdam itself, and several major organs within a half hour train ride, it's not so easy to get the numbers these days.

 

Greetings from Amsterdam,

 

Michael Hedley

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... In my own church opposite the Central Station, we averaged five times that number in this year's Summer series. Still not great, I know, but consider the organ overkill going on, not bad. ...

 

Greetings from Amsterdam,

 

Michael Hedley

 

Ah yes - I remember playing this organ. I thought it to be a fine instrument in a beautiful church.

 

Would it be fair to say that the reasonably central location of this church (and its proximity to a major rail station) helps attract good audiences?

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Ah yes - I remember playing this organ. I thought it to be a fine instrument in a beautiful church.

 

Would it be fair to say that the reasonably central location of this church (and its proximity to a major rail station) helps attract good audiences?

 

Yes, that was one of my points. We can't, and shouldn't, rely on the "organ public" any more. They are notoriously fickle in their taste (you know the sort: Bach is rubbish, and Reger is worse, give me Lefébure-Wely any day).

But, just how we attract the mainstream musical public and other new listeners to the organ is a recurring topic.

And, before I jet off to warmer climes for a few weeks, does the ever increasing number of CDs DVDs and YouTube videos maintain an interested audience, or does it stop them coming to experience the live thing?

 

Best wishes,

Michael Hedley

 

If you are interested our concerts this year:

http://www.muziekindenicolaas.nl/sauerorgel_concerten.html

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Greetings to Amsterdam, Michael.

You are fortunate to have such beautiful organs in your City !

I am always moved when I listen to this one.

 

 

 

 

Isn't this just so beautiful? It's exactly why, when I have the time, I make my way to the Netherlands to hear organists like Jos van der Kooy (the performer in that video). There is depth, tremendous scholarship behind each and every note, and yet, that simple modesty, where the interpreter is only the servant to the composer.

 

Best,

 

MM

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  • 4 weeks later...
  • 1 month later...
Hmmm.... 'worse' with regard to difficulty - or just aurally?

 

Not a thing of beauty, is it....

 

I was referring to physical and/or mental difficulty. I don't mind the occasional piece of music like this, though I wouldn't wish to make it a staple diet. Personally I find this not unattractive, but each to their own. Music doesn't always need to be beautiful, of course...

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I was referring to physical and/or mental difficulty. I don't mind the occasional piece of music like this, though I wouldn't wish to make it a staple diet. Personally I find this not unattractive, but each to their own. Music doesn't always need to be beautiful, of course...

 

No, I suppose not. It is, as you say, the perception of the listener. No doubt there are plenty who dislike the improvisations of Pierre Cochereau.

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Incidentally, just because I have a score, it doesn't mean that I play it. I bought it out of curiosity, took one look and put it aside for finer minds than mine.

 

Ah - I was about to be rather impressed.

 

I should imagine that the registrants have a difficult enough task - let alone the player.

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Ah - I was about to be rather impressed.

 

Haha! Not by me, m'sieur! <_<

 

I should imagine that the registrants have a difficult enough task - let alone the player.

 

Absolutely. They would need a quick eye and a cool head to follow the score.

 

I have just looked at the score for the first time in years and see that it is not quite as evil as I remembered, though it is certainly bad enough. Nevertheless, there will definitely be more difficult pieces out there.

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Haha! Not by me, m'sieur! <_<

 

 

 

Absolutely. They would need a quick eye and a cool head to follow the score.

 

I have just looked at the score for the first time in years and see that it is not quite as evil as I remembered, though it is certainly bad enough. Nevertheless, there will definitely be more difficult pieces out there.

 

By the way: M'sieur: popular version of "Monsieur", especially used by the children. Sounds definitively unpleasant to my ears and my eyes...

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  • 3 months later...

appeared on Youtube a few days ago - not really sure what to make of it...

 

I've said it before but I had a 'former life'!! - much of which was spent playing complex 20th century (avant-garde?) music including a time working for a professional 'improvised' theatre company (work it out yourselves!). Looking back I am particularly proud of some of the performances I gave of Messiaen, Lutoslowski, Penderecki and some of the younger 'English set' but I hang my head in shame when I think of some of the noises we produced in the late 60's early 70's. I'm thinking of excerpts of Stockhausen's Aus Den Sieben Tagen and a particularly memorably awful performance of John Cage's Theatre Piece.

 

I listened to all of it. It would, very definitely, fall into the latter category - it was awful!! - in the extreme!! I don't think it had any redeeming qualities at all!!

 

(SL now lowers his head below the parapet - to prepare to be shot down!!!)

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appeared on Youtube a few days ago - not really sure what to make of it...

 

Well...

 

I have a video of my son (then aged 3) doing something similar. However, it should be noted that:

1) The building was closed to the (paying??) public at the time.

2) Now he has reached the venerable age of 5 and has graduated to 'Chester's easiest piano course', he is capable of producing rather more musical sounds.

 

There was a time when this instrument was so closely guarded that even organ scholars from other Oxford colleges had difficulty getting to play it.

 

If somebody wanted to see what a musician from the Indian tradition might do with a western pipe organ, then why on earth didn't they secure the services of one!

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