Jump to content
Mander Organ Builders Forum

Recommended Posts

  • Replies 1.6k
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

I am.

 

This would seem to confirm what I was thinking, but didn't state... :)

 

There seems absolutely no musical point to it at all, to my humble ears - which is why I was rather surprised at the enthusiasm of the individual who uploaded it. My two year old nephew seems to have a greater improvisatory ability when I let him loose on my toaster at home...

 

Now

is more like it.

 

VA

Link to post
Share on other sites

The difficulty I have is that there are so many fluffed notes that I don't know what he intended to play to be able to pass further comment. I would take issue with the youtube poster in only one respect though. He uses the word enjoy.

Link to post
Share on other sites

The difficulty I have is that there are so many fluffed notes that I don't know what he intended to play to be able to pass further comment. I would take issue with the youtube poster in only one respect though. He uses the word enjoy.

 

I would agree. I am not even sure he had ever played a keyboard instrument prior to this event. It sounded as if an excited small child had been let loose on this instrument.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I would agree. I am not even sure he had ever played a keyboard instrument prior to this event. It sounded as if an excited small child had been let loose on this instrument.

 

======================

 

 

No,no! The first example below is a small child let loose on an instrument, and the second is a poseur making idiots of all those who are daft enough to listen.

 

 

http://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=boy+electone+winner&oq=boy+electone+winner&gs_l=youtube.3..33i21l2.937.6625.0.6703.19.16.0.0.0.0.141.1640.5j10.15.0...0.0...1ac.1.OKTc3N-t7N8

 

 

Best,

 

MM

Link to post
Share on other sites

I have to be a little careful as I have seen some of the keyboard technique used, thinking particularly of the rotation of the wrist to use the back of the fingers, in some indigenous sub continental keyboard playing with the instrument that looks and sounds like an accordion but I think may be called a melodion. This however is a comment on technique, not on peace, transcendental meditation, hypnotism or other forms of meditation, all of which I would have thought were utterly impossible with that noise going on.

 

Maybe I display a lack of understanding, maybe I have yet to discern the difference between music and noise.

 

I offer this

 

 

as an alternative, antidote, whatever, to the use of loud registrations. I also offer it as a demonstration of the talent from younger organists in the US, refreshingly avoiding the need to adopt the style of the latest incarnation of CC.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 3 weeks later...

I have to be a little careful as I have seen some of the keyboard technique used, thinking particularly of the rotation of the wrist to use the back of the fingers, in some indigenous sub continental keyboard playing with the instrument that looks and sounds like an accordion but I think may be called a melodion. This however is a comment on technique, not on peace, transcendental meditation, hypnotism or other forms of meditation, all of which I would have thought were utterly impossible with that noise going on.

 

Maybe I display a lack of understanding, maybe I have yet to discern the difference between music and noise.

 

I offer this

 

 

as an alternative, antidote, whatever, to the use of loud registrations. I also offer it as a demonstration of the talent from younger organists in the US, refreshingly avoiding the need to adopt the style of the latest incarnation of CC.

 

 

Bach doesn't come any better than this for me.

 

 

http://youtu.be/bKj2LRMoSKk

 

 

I have always considered the Mander St Ignatius organ to have one of the finest cases of any instrument in the world so it's a bit hard on my eyes to see that post immediately before a clip from the Bavokirk. Regardless I think the Mander has the more beautiful console and the bench, with its huge ornate pillars is a work of the finest art.

 

But that Demessieux video got me worried - will the bench hold out to the end. Did you see it shaking slightly?

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 1 month later...

Bach doesn't come any better than this for me.

 

 

http://youtu.be/bKj2LRMoSKk

 

Nor me. Thank you for this, Tempo Primo.

 

I also possess a DVD of Jos van der Kooy playing the instrument in the Westerkerk, Amsterdam. (Roelof Barentsz and Johannes Duyschot, 1686: A Bovenwerk was added by Christian Vater, in 1727 and the instrument was restored and largely reconstructed between 1989 - 1992, by Flentrop Orgelbouw.) The playing and the sound of the instrument are just as enjoyable as that of your clip above.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Nor me. Thank you for this, Tempo Primo.

 

I also possess a DVD of Jos van der Kooy playing the instrument in the Westerkerk, Amsterdam. (Roelof Barentsz and Johannes Duyschot, 1686: A Bovenwerk was added by Christian Vater, in 1727 and the instrument was restored and largely reconstructed between 1989 - 1992, by Flentrop Orgelbouw.) The playing and the sound of the instrument are just as enjoyable as that of your clip above.

 

Thanks very much 'pcnd5584' - I will see if the DVD is still available.

I have a recording of the Flentrop organ in Dunblane Cathedral, Scotland - played by George Wilson. (LBCD22).

This wasn't easy to find, but well worth the effort when we did.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 4 weeks later...
  • 2 weeks later...

Happened upon this this afternoon -

. It's the installation of the new Master at Trinity, Cambridge. Excellent music - a wonderful solo trumpet fanfare as he arrives at the chapel and then a great bravura performance on organ and brass of Sinfonia from Cantata 29. If you enjoy academic dress and want to do a bit of Cambridge robe-spotting you'll enjoy it too! No DMus robes in evidence, unfortunately!
Link to post
Share on other sites

Happened upon this this afternoon. It's the installation of the new Master at Trinity, Cambridge. Excellent music - a wonderful solo trumpet fanfare as he arrives at the chapel and then a great bravura performance on organ and brass of Sinfonia from Cantata 29. If you enjoy academic dress and want to do a bit of Cambridge robe-spotting you'll enjoy it too! No DMus robes in evidence, unfortunately!

 

I'm very please to see that the producers of the video managed to keep going until the end of the organ voluntary. Perhaps the BBC should take note!

 

I also noticed at least one member of the academic staff without tie and another wearing jeans. A sign of the times I suppose.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I also noticed at least one member of the academic staff without tie and another wearing jeans. A sign of the times I suppose.

 

Maybe not quite of the times. In 1974 I went in for an organ scholarship at Cambridge. The playing part was in St. Catherine's College Chapel (still the N&B/Compton in those days). The chapel was full of university people, all wearing suits and gowns - except for John Rutter who had a bright orange sweater.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Cambridge has had a reputation for, um, informality since the 1960s. I was told the Governing Body at King's debated a motion to convert the chapel into a swimming pool although I've never quite believed it.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Happened upon this this afternoon - It's the installation of the new Master at Trinity, Cambridge.

 

I loved the Fellows' two-fold 'Mexican doff' as the new Master entered Great Court...

Link to post
Share on other sites

Cambridge has had a reputation for, um, informality since the 1960s. I was told the Governing Body at King's debated a motion to convert the chapel into a swimming pool although I've never quite believed it.

 

Well it would be a swimming pool with excellent acoustics!

Link to post
Share on other sites

Cambridge has had a reputation for, um, informality since the 1960s. I was told the Governing Body at King's debated a motion to convert the chapel into a swimming pool although I've never quite believed it.

 

There are all kinds of stories told about the Governing Body at King's College during the 1960's and most of them are apocryphal and amusingl!! True, the college did have a certain informality about it, perhaps stemming from the 1960's. Tom Sharpe's comments, I won't quote them so as not to cause any offence, in 'Porterhouse Blue' are, perhaps a little typical of other college's view of King's! Speaking personally I found that the mixture of formality and informality highly conducive to college life.

 

Several things amused me about the clip and a lot impressed me, some have been mentioned already but what I did notice and I have noticed before on 'formal' occasions that have been broadcast, was the general lack of 'congregational' participation in the hymn - and I'm not talking about the third and fourth verses!

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 weeks later...

It’s Amiens. The main case was completed in 1429, the Positif was added in 1620 by Pierre le Pescheur. Here the organ is listed as Cavaillé-Coll-Roethinger.

 

Incredibly beautiful architecture. especially the main case is simply spectacular.

 

Best,

Friedrich

Link to post
Share on other sites

It’s Amiens. The main case was completed in 1429, the Positif was added in 1620 by Pierre le Pescheur. Here the organ is listed as Cavaillé-Coll-Roethinger.

 

Incredibly beautiful architecture. especially the main case is simply spectacular.

 

Best,

Friedrich

Friedrich,

 

Thank you for the reply. What a superb case: I thought it looked quite old but I didn't know it was as old as that! Is it known if there is any pipework left from the 1429 instrument or is that all long-gone by now? I would like to think some might survive. Either way I would like to assume that this is the oldest organ case remaining in France? If not then where would that be?

 

Mit gute wünschen,

 

Dave

Link to post
Share on other sites

Happened upon this this afternoon -

. It's the installation of the new Master at Trinity, Cambridge. Excellent music - a wonderful solo trumpet fanfare as he arrives at the chapel and then a great bravura performance on organ and brass of Sinfonia from Cantata 29. If you enjoy academic dress and want to do a bit of Cambridge robe-spotting you'll enjoy it too! No DMus robes in evidence, unfortunately!

Stephen Layton seems to be conducting with a red pencil (point forward), instead of a baton !

 

I believe it to be a Staedtler and, thus, authentic for the performance of Bach.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Stephen Layton seems to be conducting with a red pencil (point forward), instead of a baton !

 

I believe it to be a Staedtler and, thus, authentic for the performance of Bach.

 

Ah, but is the graphite German? You have to be careful with these modern copies.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Please sign in to comment

You will be able to leave a comment after signing in



Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...