Jump to content
Mander Organs
Justadad

Youtube

Recommended Posts

Can anyone give me a guide to the composition of the 3-manual organ installed in Westminster Cathedral between 1903 and 1907?

It was an instrument lent to the cathedral and then returned to the builders Norman&Beard. Was it broken up (recycled) for use in other instruments or did it have a new life in another setting?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Can anyone give me a guide to the composition of the 3-manual organ installed in Westminster Cathedral between 1903 and 1907?

It was an instrument lent to the cathedral and then returned to the builders Norman&Beard. Was it broken up (recycled) for use in other instruments or did it have a new life in another setting?

 

 

1902 N&B Ord Bk Vol=07 Page=224 Job=0425 temp org; org ex All Saints, West Dulwich

1906 N&B Ord Bk Vol=10 Page=312 Job=0797 temp org; to Irish International Exhibition, Dublin

 

The two entries from the BOA information (above) on the Westminster Cath NPOR record [N17955] for a Chancel organ may provide some of what you are looking for along with the specification.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The organ we are hearing is the Walker of Liverpool Metropolitan Cathedral, I think you'll find!

No idea Paul. If you read the text under the "Uploaded 4th Jul 2010" bit it simply says "Liverpool Cathedral". I have never heard either organ live and so I have no idea.

 

Dave

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The organ we are hearing is the Walker of Liverpool Metropolitan Cathedral, I think you'll find!

More than likely, I should think, as Richard Lea is (or was?) the organist at Paddy's Wigwam.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you for that flute harmonique!

 

It is the most amazing instrument and where I usually like go to Mass when I am in Paris. The last time I was there there was a totally amazing improvisation before Mass that, at one point, so devastatingly loud, I thought the organ was going to jump off the back wall!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you for that flute harmonique!

 

It is the most amazing instrument and where I usually like go to Mass when I am in Paris. The last time I was there there was a totally amazing improvisation before Mass that, at one point, so devastatingly loud, I thought the organ was going to jump off the back wall!

Your welcome!!

Marle-Ouvrard is indeed a great improviser in a very different style than Guillou. He comes from Pincemaille's school!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There is a fine trailer for Bernard Foccruelle's recording of the complete works of Matthias Weckman (alias Weckmann) here.

 

The booklet and other details, including samples, can be seen here http://www.outhere-music.com/en/albums/complete-organ-works-ric-348

 

There are details of his other recordings at http://www.outhere-music.com/fr/artistes/bernard-foccroulle

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In the heart of the organ of Notre Dame

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mGiGuTEcD-o

 

Mainly Latry and a bit of Cochereau.

 

Latry is wrong when he says that the new electric console was installed in 1970. The right date is 1963 with the Vierne's stops.

 

This doesn't appear to be available in the UK on YouTube, but can be found at

http://concert.arte.tv/fr/documentaire-dans-le-ventre-de-lorgue-de-notre-dame

 

 

Alongside a 70 minute recital by Olivier Latry, with some spectacular interior aerial shots of the Cathedral.

http://concert.arte.tv/fr/olivier-latry-lorgue-cavaille-coll-de-notre-dame-de-paris

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I recently added a video of the 113-stop Sauer organ in Berlin cathedral here https://youtu.be/8yybfR8xjyE

 

I will try to upload videos of the other 2 pieces on the programme (William Harris Sonata in a minor, Rheinberger 8th sonata) sometime soon.

 

Fantastic instrument!

 

Happy New Year to all
Barry

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Staying in Germany, and perhaps an apt choice of clip to follow on from Barry's post in view of the location of the organ in the clip, here is William Walton's "Crown Imperial" played on the Schuke organ of Magdeburg Cathedral by Martin Kondziella. I like those reeds, particularly at the end!

 

 

Dave

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Something from Finland. Petri Koivusalo (DoM, Espoo Cathedral) playing Vierne's "Carillon de Westminster". The images early in the clip of the cathedral surrounded by fallen snow makes me wish I could see that for real. :)

 

 

Dave

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This is a very interesting console. The organ is a Seifert, but I can't find much about it online. The Seifert website is undergoing renovation and is currently out of action. It seems, from this article (thanks to Google translate), to have been built in 1973 and restored 2 years ago: https://smmp.de/2014/06/18/die-orgel-im-bergkloster-klingt-wieder-wie-neu/ If that is so, this would have been recorded before the restoration. The stops, in particular, are very odd, and I'm not sure what the little levers above each stop switch do.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hello,

 

This is a very interesting console. The organ is a Seifert, but I can't find much about it online. The Seifert website is undergoing renovation and is currently out of action. It seems, from this article (thanks to Google translate), to have been built in 1973 and restored 2 years ago: https://smmp.de/2014/06/18/die-orgel-im-bergkloster-klingt-wieder-wie-neu/ If that is so, this would have been recorded before the restoration. The stops, in particular, are very odd, and I'm not sure what the little levers above each stop switch do.

 

You will find some information about the organ at orgbase.nl.

The organ has three "Freie Kombinationen" (free combinations) and the little levers above each stop are for the preparation of the combinations.

 

Cheers

tiratutti

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hello,

 

 

You will find some information about the organ at orgbase.nl.

The organ has three "Freie Kombinationen" (free combinations) and the little levers above each stop are for the preparation of the combinations.

 

Cheers

tiratutti

 

 

Vielen Dank! It looks like a nice little organ, but this seems to be the only recording online. I've not come across that style of combination system before, but it seems to be typical of German organs.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

 

Vielen Dank! It looks like a nice little organ, but this seems to be the only recording online. I've not come across that style of combination system before, but it seems to be typical of German organs.

"Freie Kombinationen" used to be quite a common system in Germany during the first half of the 20th Century. An example by Steinmeyer - 1932 Munich, St Lukas:

munich22.jpg

Edit: I thought I'd mention that, although this type of system has pretty much been taken over by computerised setter systems one advantage occurs to me, that it is possible to see which stops are affected by each of the Freie Kombinationen (in a similar way to looking at which stops have been drawn), whereas a setter system is effectively 'blind'.

On the other hand, with FK, you have only three or four combinations whereas with setter systems there is an almost unlimited number, presumably depending on the memory available.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Came across this earlier this evening and thought I would share it.

 

Installation of Cardinal Rainer Maria Woelki as Archbishop of Cologne on Saturday 20th September 2014. The opening few minutes are what I thought members would enjoy: an organ fanfare (probably making use of the high-pressure reeds at the west end?) and then into C.H.H Parry's "I Was Glad", sung in English. Organ, played by Winfried Bönig, with choir and brass conducted by Eberhard Metternich.

 

Rather nice IMO.

 

Note: TV coverage from German regional broadcaster WDR so unfortunately some talk over the music. What can be heard does sound good though.

 

Enjoy.

Dave




Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have also conducted this with a large choir (125+), accompanied by a quantity of brass (c20) and percussion. This was in a church with the organ split between the west end and ‘in the middle’ (not quite as big as the Kölner Dom), when one of my schools had its 400th ‘birthday’. Fortunately, all the performers were ‘mine’- unlike the situation with the conductor here.

 

I’m sure most of us can imagine the immensely complicated arrangements needed to put together, then produce, such a lengthy service. By the time it came to pass, conducting would be the last thing we’d want to do: more likely, go to bed for a week.

 

[On a humorous note: for a few seconds from 4:47, there’s what I thought were, when originally glimpsed, some fire service personnel in colourful, ceremonial garb !]

 

I’m not sure “gruesome” would be the word I’d use. There are some lovely, almost homely, moments - quite an accomplishment in these circumstances. The conductor seems to be a bit flappy (those loose, open hand gestures would be eradicated from the first session of Conducting 101), not quite comfortable with some of the music, unused to working with instrumental players (who don’t look or sound at ease with him and would probably say something afterwards like ‘typical choral conductor’) and sometimes ‘loose’ around the beat (players hate this); much better with the vocal forces – what must be an assemblage of multiple choirs. That swimming pool acoustic can’t be easy, either.

 

I seem to recall (I was not there) that the (1902 Coronation) première of the Parry had its problems and didn’t go all that ‘swimmingly’, either.

 

At just after 0:48 the organist can be seen in accompanying mode and, from 2:01:20, ‘filling in’ at the console. There is at least one other console shot.

 

All that wonderful smoke at the beginning takes me back. A fine ceremony, in one of the grandest (and holiest) religious edifices of Christendom.

 

I was glad I saw this.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wot, not "Vivats"? lol

 

A fine, rousing performance, but just imagine what a sound those boys could have made if they'd been trained by a Britiish choirmaster.

 

Wonderful clouds of smoke at the beginning! I couldn't help but notice, in the procession, how the laity with banners carried them with some dignity, then came the clergy, all grins, then the bishops chatting to one another. The new Archbishop has a fine singing voice.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The new Archbishop has a fine singing voice.

 

................ and his face after he intoned the opening of the 'Te Deum' at the end was a picture!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Please sign in to comment

You will be able to leave a comment after signing in



Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...