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Father Henry Willis's Greatest Hits

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[ANORAK]

 

Liverpool Cathedral is 619ft long. It covers an area of 104275 sq.ft. The tower is 311 feet high. The height of the under tower vault (i.e up to the corona gallery is 175ft).

 

That's one hell of a space to fill!

 

It is the largest enclosed in Christendom, with the exception of St. Peters.

 

Oh, and the bells are the highest, heaviest peal in the world!

 

[/ANORAK]

 

The organ needs to be loud, as trying to bully 3000 people into singing a hymn at the speed you want it, takes a fair bit of welly. It also then needs to withstand the noise, when that 3000 strong congegation decide to have a "we can sing louder than you" competition.

 

I think the organ is pretty damn perfect. It is the most versatile intrument I have ever had the priviledge to play and no matter how many times I play it, you always find new combinations of sounds (to pinch a quote off Daniel Roth!)

 

For those of you that haven't heard it - Liverpool Cathedral tomorrow, 11:15am! :o

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Nope, sorry! St. Peter's, Rome is somewhat larger than Liverpool! It has a moderate-sized three manual. Apparently it is adequate for their needs!

 

By the way, Magna - if you are on-line, perhaps you could answer your telephone (or even call me!!)

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Well, hopefully I shall have my opinions confirmed or proved wrong tomorrow.

 

I do know that the last time I heard LIverpool in the building (with Ian Tracey playing) it was extremely loud and, in my judgement, more than filled the space. I am sure that they do not need all those tubas and things - what about some nice Boisseau chamades? :o

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Anyway, to return to the posted topic: does anyone know of any surviving 'Father' Willis organs in parish churches? I have listed three or four, but I cannot recall any others at present.

 

I would be interested to hear of any others.

 

Hi

 

Do a builder search on NPOR (probably worth limiting to a county at a time though). There are 2-3 in the Hastings area - a couple of 3 manuals in the town, and a small 2 manual in the village of Brede.

 

Every Blessing

 

Tony

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Thank you, Tony!

 

Good grief - there are loads. Now I will take all of your advice and limit the search to one county at a time....

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Thank you, Tony!

 

Good grief - there are loads. Now I will take all of your advice and limit the search to one county at a time....

 

Hi

 

Glad to help. Just be wary of the search results - the builder search will throw up everything by all the Willis's - and if you're thinking of visiting, check the survey dates, some might well have been altered or removed since (if there's no survey date, then it's probably c.1930-1950!)

 

The Fr Willis at Brede is a real gem - litterally any 2 stops could be used together and sound musical. I used to practice on it occaisionally when we lived in the village.

 

Every Blessing

 

Tony

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I have a particular interest in organ plus other instruments, both contemporary and historical.  Another LP that I have is organ and guitar duets (John Williams & Peter Hurford).  I really must get my LP's out and have another listen.

 

 

============

 

Then you really MUST investigate modern/contemporary Czech music Tony!

 

MM

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============

 

Then you really MUST investigate modern/contemporary Czech music Tony!

 

MM

 

Hi

 

I'm not so sure - I'm not really a fan of "modern" classical music - and I don't have a lot to spend on recordings, so I tend to play safe. Maybe if there's anything on Radio 3 I might have a listen (yes - I knw it's unlikely!)

 

Every Blessing

 

Tony

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Guest Roffensis
Yeah, but they've got the Pope!

 

You can't have it all :o

 

Yes, but you've got the Bishop! Let's not get into that one......

 

As to being the largest enclosed space in Christedom, the internal length is not 619, but considerably shorter. The entire length INCLUDING the Lady Chapel is 619-externally. The nave and choir vaults are very high (116, cf. Westminster Abbey at 102), but the transepts are suprisingly small :o . The interior of the Metropolitan Cathedral tower in Liverpool is higher than Liverpool (175), being approx 240 feet, though only 290 to the top of the pinnacles externally. There has been a lot of misinformation given out about Liverpool Cathedral's size, yet even the central space is incredibly narrow. The Dome of St Pauls is vast but how it relates to Liverpool..... :o , and the nave at York is, I think wider. Several English cathedrals have an internal length that is longer than Liverpool. Liverpool overall is also exceeded by Milan, and some others. St Peters is vaster than any. The reason that St Peters organ is considered adequate ;) is because of the liturgy, and that involves a more accompanimental role of the choir, which has a musical heritage quite unlike the Anglican church. Oh and the tower of Liverpool is 331 or 347 from the street level on the (liturgical) south side). :o

All best,

Richard :o

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Well, it's like with the Plum-Pudding; a bit sometimes is good, too much

would mean...

A good Tuba that can be pitted against the Tutti is interesting.

On the continent this is unknown, and when I make friends listen to this

Tuba at Westminster in Reubke and Liszt (S.Preston 1985) they would

sign the contract!

(Of course this Tuba is the H&H type, there are others).

 

Best wishes,

Pierre

 

I've mentioned this elsewhere on the board; I gather the documentation on that disc is not very clear, but the Reubke was recorded in the Abbey and the Liszt in Hull City Hall. I still have the LPs, and remember enjoying the Hull tubas in the Ad Nos.

 

But H&H they ain't!

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I've mentioned this elsewhere on the board; I gather the documentation on that disc is not very clear, but the Reubke was recorded in the Abbey and the Liszt in Hull City Hall. I still have the LPs, and remember enjoying the Hull tubas in the Ad Nos.

 

But H&H they ain't!

 

Well, this has been discussed elsewhere too; the CD I'm talking about

has been entirely recorded at Westminster.

It is soooo H&H nobody could be fooled. Even the Viole d'orchestre

is typical -and very often noted by belgian organists-.

 

Best wishes,

Pierre

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The reason that St Peters organ  is considered adequate <_<  is because of the liturgy, and that involves a more accompanimental role of the choir, which has a musical heritage quite unlike the Anglican church.

By musical heritage, I take it you mean they can't sing in tune. :(

 

Jeremy Jones

London

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Guest Roffensis
Well, this has been discussed elsewhere too; the CD I'm talking about

has been entirely recorded at Westminster.

It is soooo H&H nobody could be fooled. Even the Viole d'orchestre

is typical -and very often noted by belgian organists-.

 

Best wishes,

Pierre

 

 

Yes Preston did both pieces again, and both this time at the Abbey...deffo!!!

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Guest Roffensis
By musical heritage, I take it you mean they can't sing in tune.  :(

 

Jeremy Jones

London

 

 

There are several English contenders for that accolade!!! Or should it be in tone...... <_<

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Guest Leathered-Lips
There are several English contenders for that accolade!!! Or should it be in tone...... <_<

 

Are you refering to "who hees ownseeelf beer our siiins in his own bidy on the tweeee?"

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Guest paul@trinitymusic.karoo.co.uk
Are you refering to "who hees ownseeelf beer our siiins in his own bidy on the tweeee?"

 

Thankyou to Leathered-Lips for this comment because it gives me an excuse to get something off my chest:

 

I've been longing to share a moan with anyone out there who listens to The Daily Service by choice [or expediency, in my case, since the radio in my battered white van is permanently on Radio 4 Longwave]. There appears to be a decided fashion currently for 'posh' singers with illustrious conductors deliberately mis-pronouncing sung English! More often than not the letter i as in 'sin' comes out as an e. Space and time restrictions apply, of course, so I cannot give many examples but it happenes virtually every day. A couple of (I swear to you, 100% genuine) examples should suffice:

1. a performance of 'Come Holy Ghost' by Attwood where we were reassured to hear that no eel shall come!

2. That famous Patrick Appleford Hymn: 'Leaving Lord' - I'm sure that Tony would agree that this meaning rather undermines our religion.

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Guest paul@trinitymusic.karoo.co.uk
Anyway, to return to the posted topic: does anyone know of any surviving 'Father' Willis organs in parish churches? I have listed three or four, but I cannot recall any others at present.

 

I would be interested to hear of any others.

 

Well....a quick suggestion to keep you happy!

St.Mary's Parish Church, Welshpool has (or at least had when I last played it) a totally untouched FHW of about 35 stops. Great went up to 8' and 4' reeds that made the slates flap in the roof. Needless to say, they are only ever used tastefully. The job is full of those slightly irritating superfluities: for instance, doubled flutes at 8' and 4' on the Choir. Virtually anywhere else, some keen young organist would have replaced the second ones with Nazat, Terz, Nineteenth or Krummhorn or similar if they'd been organist in the 70s and 80s. The organist then was an interesting guy called Ron Pugh whose hobby seemed to be alcohol. His daytime job was manning a government listening station (spying on his country-men perhaps?). I remember with real pleasure an occasion when I gave a recital there to celebrate a Harvest festival. Quite near the beginning of the programme, there was a power cut. Local knowledge suggested that this might continue for some time so we went to plan B. The two churchwardens themselves took turns to work the blowing handle. Three things to note here

1. That the blowing plant was in as good a working condition as the rest of the job

2. That a single 'hand-blower' seemed (very surprisingly) to be perfectly adequate for such a meaty job.

3. That the church had elected people to high office who were prepared to lead by example - I often wish there were more doers and less talkers in the world.

 

Off the subject of Parish Churches but still with FHW:

Oxford has a number of little-spoiled FHWs. The Town Hall instrument can be a bit wayward mechanically from time to time but it's a fantastic beast once you have picked the right programme. Once again, on paper it doesn't make much sense by today's standards. There is a similar sized instrument in the Hall at Balliol College, and I don't think it gets an airing very often. I gave a recital upon it many years ago and was rather amused to find that one had to use the equivalent of a loft ladder from a narrow throughfare below to get into the gallery at all. Apart from some aluminium-tinted brush-paint-work on the front pipes this seemed in original or near-original condition.

 

Anybody know the small but effective FHW in Wadham College, Oxford? It boasts a Spitzflute 2' on the Great and this has been claimed to be authentic. I have my doubts.

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2. That famous Patrick Appleford Hymn: 'Leaving Lord' - I'm sure that Tony would agree that this meaning rather undermines our religion.

 

Hi

 

Yes - I definitely agree with you - the scripture says "I will never leave you ..". It seems to me that there's been a trend inrecent years for choirs and soloists to concentrate on the sound rather than communicating the words they're singing. Anyone care to comment?

 

Every Blessing

 

Tony

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Well....a quick suggestion to keep you happy!

St.Mary's Parish Church, Welshpool has (or at least had when I last played it) a totally untouched FHW of about 35 stops. Great went up to 8' and 4' reeds that made the slates flap in  the roof.  Needless to say, they are only ever used tastefully.  The job is full of those slightly irritating superfluities: for instance, doubled flutes at 8' and 4' on the Choir. Virtually anywhere else, some keen young organist would have replaced the second ones with Nazat, Terz, Nineteenth or Krummhorn or similar if they'd been organist in the 70s and 80s. The organist then was an interesting guy called Ron Pugh whose hobby seemed to be alcohol.  His daytime job was manning a government listening station (spying on his country-men perhaps?).  I remember with real pleasure an occasion when I gave a recital there to celebrate a Harvest festival. Quite near the beginning of the programme, there was a power cut.  Local knowledge suggested that this might continue for some time so we went to plan B. The two churchwardens themselves took turns to work the blowing handle. Three things to note here

1. That the blowing plant was in as good a working condition as the rest of the job

2. That a single 'hand-blower' seemed (very surprisingly) to be perfectly adequate for such a meaty job.

3. That the church had elected people to high office who were prepared to lead by example - I often wish there were more doers and less talkers in the world.

 

Off the subject of Parish Churches but still with FHW:

Oxford has a number of little-spoiled FHWs. The Town Hall instrument can be a bit wayward mechanically from time to time but it's a fantastic beast once you have picked the right programme. Once again, on paper it doesn't make much sense by today's standards.  There is a similar sized instrument in the Hall at Balliol College, and I don't think it gets an airing very often.  I gave a recital upon it many years ago and was rather amused to find that one had to use the equivalent of a loft ladder from a narrow throughfare below to get into the gallery at all.  Apart from some aluminium-tinted brush-paint-work on the front pipes this seemed in original or near-original condition.

 

Anybody know the small but effective FHW in Wadham College, Oxford?  It boasts a Spitzflute 2' on the Great and this has been claimed to be authentic. I have my doubts.

 

Thank you for those details, Paul.

 

I also agree with you as regards diction. I have a very musical colleage who insists on substituting certain consonants when training choirs. For example: 'God' becomes 'Got[t]'. He did this type of thing when deputising for me at a few boys' practices a few years ago. Of course, the boys told me straight away on the Friday night full practice, so I had a word with him - I pointed out that I did not wish our choristers to sound as if they had recently joined the Hitler Youth movement....you get the picture. Nothing more was said!

 

Insofar as Patrick Appleford's ecclesiastical slow rock is concerned, I personally think that it sounds pretty bad however it is sung. Notwithstanding, I would always wish our choir to sing with a good, clear (but un-fussy) diction!

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Back to subject of Father Willis......

 

Can I recommend two organs of particular note in the Tyne and Wear region. St Dominic's Priory is a wonderful old lady in a Catholic Church in Byker (of Byker Grove fame), although in a very poor state. An appeal is currently underway to have it cleaned and restored.

 

Pedal

1 Open Diapason 16

2 Bourdon 16

3 Violoncello 8

4 Ophicleide 16

 

Great

5 Double Open Diapason 16

6 Open Diapason 8

7 Open Diapason 8

8 Claribel Flute 8

9 Principal 4

10 Twelfth 2 2/3

11 Fifteenth 2

12 Sesquialtera III 17.19.22

13 Tromba 8

14 Clarion 4

 

Swell

15 Lieblich Bourdon 16

16 Open Diapason 8

17 Lieblich Gedact 8

18 Salcional 8 sic

19 Vox Angelica 8 Grooved to Lieblich Gedact

20 Gemshorn 4

21 Mixture III 15.19.22?

22 Cornopean 8

23 Hautboy 8

24 Vox Humana 8

25 Tremulant By pedal

 

Choir

26 Claribel Flute 8

27 Lieblich Gedact 8

28 Viola da Gamba 8

29 Dulciana 8

30 Concert Flute 4

31 Corno di Bassetto 8

 

 

4 composition pedals to Great and Pedal

3 composition pedals to Swell

Toe pedals for Gt-Pd, Swell Tremulant

Ratchet Swell pedal

 

 

In immaculate condition however is the nearly identical Willis in St. Georges Gateshead. This one is doubly interesting as it was designed by Father Henry Willis but built by Henry Willis II in 1901. The church are very proud of this organ-justifiably, but woe betide anyone who refers to the St. George's organ as anything other than Father Willis. You'll find their (80 year old) vicar chasing you down the high street!! A true gem with Huge great reeds in a very flattering acoustic indeed- I love it. Also an exceptionally keen Gamba on the Choir, which can hold its own against the Swell and Great 8' Flues as a Solo stop.

Pedal

1 Open Diapason 16

2 Bourdon 16

3 Octave 8

4 Ophicleide 16

 

 

Choir

5 Hohl Flöte 8

6 Dulciana 8

7 Gamba 8

8 Harmonic Flute 4

9 Piccolo 2

10 Corno di Bassetto 8

 

Great

11 Double Diapason 16

12 Open Diapason 8

13 Open Diapason 8

14 Claribel Flute 8

15 Principal 4

16 Twelfth 2 2/3

17 Fifteenth 2

18 Mixture III 12.15.22

19 Trumpet 8

20 Clarion 4

 

Swell

21 Lieblich Bourdon 16

22 Open Diapason 8

23 Lieblich Gedact 8

24 Salcional 8 Sic.

25 Vox Angelica 8 Grooved

26 Gemshorn 4

27 Flageolet 2

28 Cornopean 8

29 Hautboy 8

30 Vox Humana 8

31 Tremulant By knob

 

It was restored by Harrisons about 18 months ago and the result is superb. If anyone's interested James Lancelot is playing a Friday night recital on the 30th September, along with wine and canapes. Do go - St. Georges always put on recitals with great style and the are well worth it. They feature the great and the good regularly: Colin Walsh, Kevin Bowyer, Keith Wright and Francis Jackson are all recent visitors and many more besides.

 

Anyone considering visiting Newcastle/Gateshead for these two Willis' should also consider taking time to go and hear other historic organs in the area including the Two untouched Lewis' on Tyneside (St. Hilda's South Shields and St. Georges Cullercoats), Binns organs in St. Georges West Jesmond (4m) and St. Andrew's Newgate Street (3m), and vintage Arthur Harrison at St. John's Grainger Street (3m) and the City Hall (4 m). There are also superb organs built more recently in in Gosforth (Nicholson 2000) and the Haymarket (Cuthbert Harrison 4m, 62 stops), and nearby the Phelps at Hexham Abbey too. Its not as grim up north as you may think. :lol:

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Guest Roffensis
Back to subject of Father Willis......

 

Can I recommend two organs of particular note in the Tyne and Wear region. St Dominic's Priory is a wonderful old lady in a Catholic Church in Byker (of Byker Grove fame), although in a very poor state. An appeal is currently underway to have it cleaned and restored.

 

Pedal

1 Open Diapason 16 

2 Bourdon 16 

3 Violoncello 8 

4 Ophicleide 16 

 

Great

5 Double Open Diapason 16 

6 Open Diapason 8 

7 Open Diapason 8 

8 Claribel Flute 8 

9 Principal 4 

10 Twelfth 2 2/3 

11 Fifteenth 2 

12 Sesquialtera III 17.19.22

13 Tromba 8 

14 Clarion 4 

 

Swell

15 Lieblich Bourdon 16 

16 Open Diapason 8 

17 Lieblich Gedact 8 

18 Salcional 8 sic

19 Vox Angelica 8 Grooved to Lieblich Gedact

20 Gemshorn 4 

21 Mixture III 15.19.22?

22 Cornopean 8 

23 Hautboy 8 

24 Vox Humana 8 

25 Tremulant  By pedal

 

Choir

26 Claribel Flute 8 

27 Lieblich Gedact 8 

28 Viola da Gamba 8 

29 Dulciana 8 

30 Concert Flute 4 

31 Corno di Bassetto 8 

4 composition pedals to Great and Pedal

3 composition pedals to Swell

Toe pedals for Gt-Pd, Swell Tremulant

Ratchet Swell pedal

In immaculate condition however is the nearly identical Willis in St. Georges Gateshead. This one is doubly interesting as it was designed by Father Henry Willis but built by Henry Willis II in 1901. The church are very proud of this organ-justifiably, but woe betide anyone who refers to the St. George's organ as anything other than Father Willis. You'll find their (80 year old) vicar chasing you down the high street!! A true gem with Huge great reeds in a very flattering acoustic indeed- I love it. Also an exceptionally keen Gamba on the Choir, which can hold its own against the Swell and Great 8' Flues as a Solo stop.

Pedal

1 Open Diapason 16 

2 Bourdon 16 

3 Octave 8 

4 Ophicleide 16 

 

 

Choir

5 Hohl Flöte 8 

6 Dulciana 8 

7 Gamba 8 

8 Harmonic Flute 4 

9 Piccolo 2 

10 Corno di Bassetto 8 

 

Great

11 Double Diapason 16 

12 Open Diapason 8 

13 Open Diapason 8 

14 Claribel Flute 8 

15 Principal 4 

16 Twelfth 2 2/3 

17 Fifteenth 2 

18 Mixture III 12.15.22

19 Trumpet 8 

20 Clarion 4 

 

Swell

21 Lieblich Bourdon 16 

22 Open Diapason 8 

23 Lieblich Gedact 8 

24 Salcional 8 Sic.

25 Vox Angelica 8 Grooved

26 Gemshorn 4 

27 Flageolet 2 

28 Cornopean 8 

29 Hautboy 8 

30 Vox Humana 8 

31 Tremulant  By knob

 

It was restored by Harrisons about 18 months ago and the result is superb. If anyone's interested James Lancelot is playing a Friday night recital on the 30th September, along with wine and canapes. Do go - St. Georges always put on recitals with great style and the are well worth it. They feature the great and the good regularly: Colin Walsh, Kevin Bowyer, Keith Wright and Francis Jackson are all recent visitors and many more besides.

 

Anyone considering visiting Newcastle/Gateshead for these two Willis' should also consider taking time to go and hear other historic organs in the area including the Two untouched Lewis' on Tyneside (St. Hilda's South Shields and St. Georges Cullercoats), Binns organs in St. Georges West Jesmond (4m) and St. Andrew's Newgate Street (3m), and vintage Arthur Harrison at St. John's Grainger Street (3m) and the City Hall (4 m). There are also superb organs built more recently in in Gosforth (Nicholson 2000) and the Haymarket (Cuthbert Harrison 4m, 62 stops), and nearby the Phelps at Hexham Abbey too. Its not as grim up north as you may think.  :lol:

 

 

I moved to Liverpool very many years ago. I consider the north has by far infintely superior organs to the south, and it was a major reason to move here. The Willis organ you mention on paper looks a gem.

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I moved to Liverpool very many years ago. I consider the north has by far infintely superior organs to the south, and it was a major reason to move here. The Willis organ you mention on paper looks a gem.

 

Indeed- but even now the same holds truethere are some beautiful new organs around here too- Hexham Abbey's Phelps is justly world famous with the most beatiful Principal Chorus on the Great

Department Stop name Pitch

 

Pedal

1 Principal 16

2 Soubasse 16

3 Octave Basse 8

4 Bourdon 8

5 Octave 4

6 Fourniture IV

7 Bombarde 16

8 Basson 16

9 Trompette 8

10 Chalumeau 4

 

Great

11 Bourdon 16

12 Principal 8

13 Flute a Cheminee 8

14 Octave 4

15 Flute Conique 4

16 Super Octave 2

17 Cornet V TC

18 Fourniture V

19 Trompette 8

20 Clairon 4

 

Swell

21 Bourdon 8

22 Salicional 8

23 Voix Celeste 8 TC

24 Principal 4

25 Flute 4

26 Nasard 2 2/3

27 Doublette 2

28 Flute a Bec 2

29 Tierce 1 3/5

30 Larigot 1 1/3

31 Cymbale IV

32 Basson 16

33 Cromorne 8

34 Hautbois 8

 

I also have a soft spot for the 1988 Collins Organ in St. Oswald's Durham. I was Organ Scholar there between 1999 and 2003 and played it for two services every Sunday. Like many Collins organs it doesn't stay in tune at all well, and added to that that until recently it was "maintained" by a local cut-price cock up merchant who never regulated the action and broke more than he fixed. Consequently, the Ozzies organ has gained a rather poor reputation over the last few years, however now that it is properly maintained it sounds very nice indeed, especially if you bear in mind that the huge VI rank Swell Mixture is really too big for the Swell itself and is best used as a Sharp Mixture to the Great. The only real achilles heel are the two swell reeds. There is a very atmospheric, wheezy Vox Humana on the Choir - not much use in reportoire, but perfect for naughty organ scholars who like making sheep noises in the Psalms!! The case work has to be seen to be believed- the completed church itself dates from 1412 and the cases really do look as if they have been there ever since.

 

Pedal

1 Subbass 16

2 Principal 8

3 Bass Flute 8

4 Fifteenth 4

5 Trombone 16

 

Great

6 Open Diapason 8

7 Stopt Diapason 8

8 Principal 4

9 Hohl Flute 4

10 Fifteenth 2

11 Cornet II 12.17

12 Mixture IV 19.22.26.29

13 Trumpet 8

14 Tremulant

 

Swell

15 Open Flute 8

16 Bell Gamba 8

17 Principal 4

18 Block Flute 4

19 Gemshorn 2

20 Mixture IV-VI 22.26.29.33

21 Cremona 16

22 Hautbois 8

23 Tremulant

 

Choir

24 Chimney Flute 8

25 Principal 4

26 Nason Flute 4

27 Nazard 2 2/3

28 Fifteenth 2

29 Tierce 1 3/5

30 Two & Twenty 1

31 Vox Humana 8

32 Tremulant

 

My own church installes a superb new Nicholson in 2000. Here it is:

Pedal

1 Sub Bass 16

2 Bourdon 16 A

3 Principal 8

4 Bass Flute 8

5 Fifteenth 4

6 Posaune 16

7 Spare

 

 

Great

8 Bourdon 16 A

9 Open Diapason 8

10 Stopped Diapason 8

11 Viola 8

12 Principal 4

13 Chimney Flute 4

14 Nazard 2 2/3

15 Fifteenth 2

16 Block Flute 2

17 Tierce 1 3/5

18 Fourniture IV 15.19.22.26

19 Trumpet 8

20 Corno di Bassetto 8

21 Tremulant

 

Swell

22 Open Diapason 8

23 Covered Flute 8

24 Salicional 8

25 Voix Celeste 8 g

26 Principal 4

27 Tapered Flute 4

28 Fifteenth 2

29 Mixture III 19.22.26

30 Trumpet 8

31 Oboe 8

32 Tremulant

 

It is a delight to play- particularly the Viola which is an extremely useful Solo stop as well as acting as a No.2 Open for the Great. The Cornet Separe is also stunning. We hope that the Spare slider will eventually be occupied by a 16' Bassoon too.

 

Finally, there's the slightly less recent but equally impressive Cuthbert Harrison "Coventry-a-like" organ of 1961:

 

Pedal

1 Double Open Wood 32

2 Open Wood 16

3 Violone 16

4 Sub Bass 16

5 Lieblich Bourdon 16 Solo

6 Principal 8

7 Flute 8

8 Octave Quint 5 1/3

9 Octave 4

10 Octave Flute 4

11 Mixture III

12 Trombone 16

13 Trumpet 8

14 Schalmei 4

15 Orchestral Trumpet 8 Solo

 

Great

16 Double Geigen 16

17 Open Diapason I 8

18 Open Diapason II 8

19 Stopped Diapason 8

20 Octave 4

21 Wald Flute 4

22 Octave Quint 2 2/3

23 Super Octave 2

24 Mixture IV

25 Cornet V Middle C

26 Trumpet 8

27 Clarion 4

 

Swell

28 Diapason 8

29 Rohr Gedackt 8

30 Salicional 8

31 Celeste 8 AA

32 Principal 4

33 Spitzflute 4

34 Fifteenth 2

35 Mixture IV

36 Oboe 8

37 Tremulant

38 Contra Fagotto 16

39 Cornopean 8

40 Clarion 4

 

 

Positive

41 Diapason 8

42 Quintadena 8

43 Gedackt 8

44 Principal 4

45 Rohr Flute 4

46 Nazard 2 2/3

47 Gemshorn 2

48 Tierce 1 3/5

49 Cimbel III

50 Trompette 8

51 Orchestral Trumpet 8 Solo

 

Solo

52 Bourdon 16

53 Dulciana 8

54 Spitzflute 8

55 Viole 8 AA, was Unda Maris

56 Nachthorn 4

57 Octave 4

58 Open Flute 2

59 Quint 1 1/3

60 Sifflote 1

61 Sesquialtera II TC

62 Cromorne 8 was Clarinet

63 Tremulant

64 Orchestral Trumpet 8

 

The reason for including all of these specs is really to whet the whistle. People have before suggested meeting up for recitals. How about an organ crawl?

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I agree - the organ landscape in the south does seem rather barren. I've considered moving to Holland at some stage so I can play better organs on a regular basis....

 

Just a guick question - were the scudamore positive organs based on Willis principals? I've come across one or two of these things and their style - narrow scaled pipes blown hard, relatively small, high-cut lips, heavily dubbed lips, pneumatic action on the smallest of them - lieblich gedacts, salicionals - they look very "Willis" to me. Generally the things sound rather harsh in the intimate space of a small church with little acoustic and come across as rather unlovely. I call them "Granny Organs" since I think they were designed for your archetypal reluctant Granny to play....

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