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Father Henry Willis's Greatest Hits

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It really is so barren down here in the South. One struggles to think of even a single decent instrument, except perhaps:-

 

Truro, Bath Abbey, Bristol Cathedral, St. Mary Redcliffe, Salisbury, Hereford, Kingston, RFH, Albert Hall, Westminster Abbey, Westminster Cathedral, St. Paul's, Tewkesbury, Chichester, Wincester, Rochester, Oxford (Queens College, New College, Magdalen, Christchurch)..........

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It really is so barren down here in the South. One struggles to think of even a single decent instrument, except perhaps:-

 

Truro, Bath Abbey, Bristol Cathedral, St. Mary Redcliffe, Salisbury, Hereford, Kingston, RFH, Albert Hall, Westminster Abbey, Westminster Cathedral, St. Paul's, Tewkesbury, Chichester, Wincester, Rochester, Oxford (Queens College, New College, Magdalen, Christchurch)..........

 

 

Wot, nuffing in' Cambridge ? And before World War 2.5 breaks out would someone care to stipulate where the equivalent of the Mason-Dixon Line dividing North and South lies ? As someone Essex born and bred Manchester seemed indubitably part of the grim North, but my sister-in-law is from Stornoway and for her it is far to the South virtually next door to London ! That raises another issue - what is the country we are talking about. Some English people occasionally use England as if it were a synonym for Great Britain or even the United Kingdom. Having thoughtlessly done it myself in my more callow youth I can testify to the extent to which this habit gets right up the nose of any Jock, Taffy or Paddy who is present !

 

All that said, it does seem to me that if one simply considers organs located in liturgical buildings it is difficult to argue for any conclusion other than that there are significant organs to be found the length and breadth of the country, with rather more to be found in the greater centres of population. It is hardly to be wondered at that there are rather more of them in South East England than the Western Highlands of Scotland. On the other hand if one is considering significant Town Hall Organs then it is difficult to deny that the majority of them are situated in the Midlands and the North, the former great centres of industrial power and entrepreneurial wealth. Outside of London where in the South are the instruments to compare with the civic organs of Liverpool, Leeds, Huddersfield, Hull, Newcastle (when playable)Sheffield ? Reading, yes: Oxford, but it hardly equates in size ? I know of no equivalent in Suffolk, Essex or Kent, Herts, Bedfordshire or Bucks. There is, of course, the Dome organ in Brighton which happily bucks the trend but it does have an awful lot of percussion stops and effects, and some may try to disqualify it . Apart from it, Bournemouth Pavilion and Southampton Guildhall - also cross-over organs bridging the divide between a conventional pipe organ and the mighty wurlitzer, what else is there south of the Bristol to the Wash line ? This is a genuine and not a rhetorical question.

 

Best wishes,

 

Brian Childs

 

Oops, forgot about the Colston Hall in Bristol. Anyone else remember the Preston performance of the Elgar Sonata recorded there , and what was I think Germani's last recording for EMI with Franck and Reger ?

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Wot, nuffing in' Cambridge ?

I thought about including Cambridge, but thought this would risk starting the argument about where the north/south divide lies. I wouldn't regard Birmingham as being in the north of England so there would be several more worthy instruments that could be listed there - but its not in the south of England either.

 

Colston Hall's a good shout though.

 

We have very a worthy 3-manual Rushworth & Dreaper organ in Cheltenham Town Hall. It lacks upper-work but none-the-less produces a very rich and exciting sound and would be hard to better as an instrument for playing the organ parts where called for in the choral and orchestral works of Elgar for example. There's also a fine (but heavy tracker) 3-manual in Kidderminster Town Hall, I can't remember the builder with certainty - possibly Hill?

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Guest Roffensis
I thought about including Cambridge, but thought this would risk starting the argument about where the north/south divide lies. I wouldn't regard Birmingham as being in the north of England so there would be several more worthy instruments that could be listed there - but its not in the south of England either.

 

Colston Hall's a good shout though.

 

We have very a worthy 3-manual Rushworth & Dreaper organ in Cheltenham Town Hall. It lacks upper-work but none-the-less produces a very rich and exciting sound and would be hard to better as an instrument for playing the organ parts where called for in the choral and orchestral works of Elgar for example. There's also a fine (but heavy tracker) 3-manual in Kidderminster Town Hall, I can't remember the builder with certainty - possibly Hill?

 

 

I did not know about Cheltenham. Dover has a four decker HNB, in the town hall. Kidderminster is, I think, Hill. The Germani /Franck etc recording at Selby was reissued on CD by EMI. I think they might have deleted it in their wisdom.

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I did not know about Cheltenham. Dover has a four decker HNB, in the town hall. Kidderminster is, I think, Hill. The Germani /Franck etc recording at Selby was reissued on CD by EMI. I think they might have deleted it in their wisdom.

 

 

Hi Richard,

 

The one I was referring to was an LP CSD 3674 recorded by the Culverhouse/ Eltham team, issued in 1970. It says Fernando Germani plays at the Colston Hall on the front of the sleeve and pictures him sitting at the console :it gives the Colston Hall Organ specification on the back, in the manner of the Great Cathedral Organ Series LP sleeves. The music comprises Reger BACH (op 46) and Pastorale (op 59/2) coupled with Franck Grande Piece Symphonique. I do not know whether Germani ever recorded that at Selby. I thought it was the 3 Chorales and Piece Heroique. But I do not have those performances in my collection.

 

Best wishes,

 

Brian Childs

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Hi

 

Yes - I definitely agree with you - the scripture says "I will never leave you ..".  It seems to me that there's been a trend inrecent years for choirs and soloists to concentrate on the sound rather than communicating the words they're singing.  Anyone care to comment?

 

Every Blessing

 

Tony

 

I recall Mr Cleobury doing one of those pre-Xmas Nine Lessons 'n' Carols documentaries about 6-7 years ago where he did a long piece to camera about making the boys sing in a cod Italian accent "for clarity". In principle, and properly balanced, it will work to flatten out some of the less attractive sounds in English dialects. I wonder if rather too many have taken this dictum as gospel, giving us leaving Lords and harts desiring the water brewksss and as it was in the begeeeening.

 

And - Wadham, Oxford is magnificent - can't comment on the Spitzflute's authenticity, but if it was later it was by someone good - in particular, the stophead matches exceptionally well, which wouldn't have been the case if they'd got Martin of Oxford in to do it. All the nomenclature is a mixture of French, German and English. I seem to recall it was recased by Willis a few years after being originally built and some playing aids were stuck on in the 30's so I spose it could have been changed then.

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Well, indeed. Perhaps there is not such a paucity of good instruments south of the Watford Gap....

 

It is true that there are many wonderful organs in the north, but there are also many in the south, too!

 

In addition to nfortin's list, I would also propose: Exeter Cathedral, Buckfast Abbey, St. Andrew's, Plymouth, Kilkhampton Parish Church, Okehampton Parish Church, Crediton Parish Church, Salisbury Cathedral, Romsey Abbey, Wimborne Minster, St. Peter's, Bournemouth, St. Stephen's, Bournemouth, St. Mary's. Portsea, Portsmouth Cathedral, St. Augustine's, Kilburn, St. Luke's, Chelsea, All Hallows, Barking-by-the-tower, St. Clement Danes, St. Giles', Cripplegate, St. James', Sussex Gardens, All Souls', Langham Place, St. James', Spanish Place, St. Mary's, Rotherhithe, St. Peter's, Eaton Square, Southwark Cathedral....

 

Well, you get the idea. :unsure:

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Hi Richard

 

About St Giles Cripplegate........

 

I have asked Rick Wakeman several times about where he recorded the organ parts for 'Close to the Edge' and he always claims Rock and Roll amnesia. I always suspected it was St Giles Cripplegate because of his other work there, and also because it sounds like it (based on my organ lessons there 15 years ago.....)

 

So can you quote a source for this information?????

 

Many thanks......

 

Chris

 

let's also not forget Wakeman on the "Six Wives" using St Giles Cripplegate, another gem of an organ, very well restored by Manders. It also featured in "Close To The Edge" by Yes.

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Picking up the original theme .... I don't think that anyone has mentioned the Willis organ at St Martin on the Hill in Scarborough, Yorkshire, which is almost "untouched".

 

I am told that it was installed by FHW when he had a little "spare time" in between working on some of the big jobs he was doing at the time and was never really finished (a few "prepared for" stops).

 

In 1928, it seems that a few minor changes were made, the choir organ was enclosed and balanced swell pedals were fitted. In 1974, JWW changed the Swell TP action to EP, but left the Floating lever on the Great. 10 years later they added the Ophicleide.

 

Around 2000-2001 Principal Pipe Organs did a full restoration with the intention of getting the instrument back to how it might have been in 1890 had FHW finished it (i.e. original actions and prepared for stops added).

 

The current specification is:

 

Ped: Wood, Violone, Bdn, Oct, Cello, Ophicleide - TP action

Ch: Viol, Dulc, Claribel, Gedact, Flutes 4' & 2', Corno di Bassetto - Tracker

Gt: Dble, I, II, Claribel, Pr, Fl Harm, 12th, 15th, III, 16, 8, 4 - Floating lever

Sw: Bdn, Diap, Gedact, Salic, Vox Ang, 4', 2', III, 16, 8, 8, 4, Vox H - TP action

Usual 5 couplers (no Sw/Ch) plus Sw Oct + Suboct and separate Sw Oct + Sub Oct to Gt

7 fixed combination pedals (4 Gt+Ped 3 Sw) and no thumb pistons - mechanical drawstop action.

 

I came across this instrument when I gave a recital on it just after it was rebuilt - I included Franck's Chorale III and Howells' Master Tallis' Testament, both of which required much thought about registration (given the lack of playing aids and the physical effort to get full great down to a couple of stops using the combination pedals). I recall that the sound was very rich and (typically) reed dominated.

 

The church itself, designed by Bodley, is worth a visit (for those of us who like Victorian Architecture). Curiously, the FHW organ replaced an earlier instrument built by Harrison (just the one in those days) - I wonder whether this was the only time that FHW replaced a Harrison instrument!

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Guest Roffensis
Hi Richard

 

About St Giles Cripplegate........

 

I have asked Rick Wakeman several times about where he recorded the organ parts for 'Close to the Edge' and he always claims Rock and Roll amnesia. I always suspected it was St Giles Cripplegate because of his other work there, and also because it sounds like it (based on my organ lessons there 15 years ago.....)

 

So can you quote a source for this information?????

 

Many thanks......

 

Chris

 

 

Good question, I have read it though, on a YES site or similar, and it certainly was Cripplegate. I will have a look around tomorrow when I am off.

R

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It really is so barren down here in the South. One struggles to think of even a single decent instrument, except perhaps:-

 

Truro, Bath Abbey, Bristol Cathedral, St. Mary Redcliffe, Salisbury, Hereford, Kingston, RFH, Albert Hall, Westminster Abbey, Westminster Cathedral, St. Paul's, Tewkesbury, Chichester, Wincester, Rochester, Oxford (Queens College, New College, Magdalen, Christchurch)..........

 

=====================

 

I know what the problem is.........

 

Truro (Willis), Bristol (Walker) Redcliffe (Harrison) Salisbury (Willis), Kingston (Marcussen?), RFH (Harrison), Albert Hall (Willis/Harrison), Abbey (Harrison), Westminster Cath. (Willis), St.Paul's (Willis/Mander) Tewskbury (Mitchell & Thynne + other bits and bobs), Chichester (Mander), Wichester (Willis), Rochester (Willis) etc.

 

Leaving out Bristol, Kingston, Tewksbury (dangerously close to the Midlands), Oxford and Chichester, it's a bit monochrome isn't it?

 

To the Willis/Harrison list, one might add Exeter, Windsor, St.Albans, Cambridge (Kings), Croydon (Fairfield Hall), Worcester, Hereford, Canterbury etc etc.

 

In the North, we have notable organs by Cavaille-Coll, Gray & Davison/Wood, Walker (Met.Pot.Liverpool, York & Blackburn for example), Lewis, Compton, Marcussen, Wurlitzer, a few untouched Fr.Willis organs, Hill, H.N & B, untouched Arthur Harrisons, Binns, Nicholson, Forster & Andrews, Schulze...the list goes on and on.

 

It's the difference between the monotony of "East Enders" and the joys of "Coronation Street."

 

All we REALLY need is a superb new Mander, and I know just the place where it should go, if they ever raise the funds and dump the electronic substitute.

 

As the hymn goes, "Hills of the North rejoice."

 

MM

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=====================

 

I know what the problem is.........

 

Truro (Willis), Bristol (Walker) Redcliffe (Harrison) Salisbury (Willis), Kingston (Marcussen?), RFH (Harrison), Albert Hall (Willis/Harrison), Abbey (Harrison), Westminster Cath. (Willis), St.Paul's (Willis/Mander) Tewskbury (Mitchell & Thynne + other bits and bobs), Chichester (Mander), Wichester (Willis), Rochester (Willis) etc.

 

Leaving out Bristol, Kingston, Tewksbury (dangerously close to the Midlands), Oxford and Chichester, it's a bit monochrome isn't it?

 

To the Willis/Harrison list, one might add Exeter, Windsor, St.Albans, Cambridge (Kings), Croydon (Fairfield Hall),  Worcester, Hereford, Canterbury etc etc.

 

In the North, we have notable organs by Cavaille-Coll, Gray & Davison/Wood, Walker (Met.Pot.Liverpool, York & Blackburn for example), Lewis, Compton, Marcussen,  Wurlitzer,  a few untouched Fr.Willis organs, Hill, H.N & B, untouched Arthur Harrisons, Binns, Nicholson, Forster & Andrews, Schulze...the list goes on and on.

 

It's the difference between the monotony of "East Enders" and the joys of "Coronation Street."

 

All we REALLY need is a superb new Mander, and I know just the place where it should go, if they ever raise the funds and dump the electronic substitute.

 

As the hymn goes, "Hills of the North rejoice."

 

MM

 

This is very naughty of you, and very selective: what about Tonbridge School Chapel, St John's Cambridge (Marcussen), Norwich Cathedral (HNB),The Dome , Brighton (HNB/Wells), Odeon Leicester Square (Compton), Southwark Cathedral (Lewis) ,Downside Abbey (Compton), Bath Abbey (Klais) , Christchurch Oxford (Rieger),Queen's College, Oxford (Frobenius), Farnborough Abbey (CC/Mutin), Wimborne Minster (Walker), plus of course the likes of St Mary's Rotherhithe, St Michael's, Framlingham and Thaxted Parish Church (unplayable, but thus still original).

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=====================

Rochester (Willis)

Nay, forsooth! This was a Walker before Manders rebuilt it. I played the old organ once and, with all deference to our host, I don't think the present instrument is as gracious - though the full organ is undeniably electrifying. Doc Ashfield thinks it's a superb instrument though.

 

It's the difference between the monotony of "East Enders" and the joys of "Coronation Street."
But I thought they'd just rebuilt "Eastenders" at a cost of several thousand pounds - as in thrown out some of the old speaking stops and replaced them with some new ones. Not that I follow such shenanigans, you understand; I merely believe everything my better half tells me (it's better for my health that I do).

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Indeed, MM!

 

I presume that you mean Sheffield as a suitable location for the 'new' Mander?

 

=====================

 

Yes....and what annoys me, is the fact that the "old" organ has some perfectly good "new" contained within, yet they insist that it is a heap of musical scrap.

 

I never considered it a bad organ, but as a concept, maybe just a little absurd.

 

I don't think the organ-builder (Noel Mander) was ever given the credit he and his team deserved, because they actually managed to create a musical instrument in spite of the whims and fads of a certain past organist.

 

MM

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Guest paul@trinitymusic.karoo.co.uk
=====================

 

Yes....and what annoys me, is the fact that the "old" organ has some perfectly good "new" contained within, yet they insist that it is a heap of musical scrap.

 

I never considered it a bad organ, but as a concept, maybe just a little absurd.

 

I don't think the organ-builder (Noel Mander) was ever given the credit he and his team deserved, because they actually managed to create a musical instrument in spite of the whims and fads of a certain past organist.

 

MM

 

 

I think that this is unkind to Graham Matthews.

 

The main problem with the Willis/Mander organ at Sheffield (in my humble opinion, of course) is that it was sited much too far from the choirstalls. This fault should probably be laid at the door of the cathedral architect not any musician or organ-builder.

 

The Sheffield pipe organ (incidentally virtually all still there, even if the console has been hidden away) also stands in an unsubtle acoustic, and the 70's somewhat neo-classic voicing did not endear it to listeners as an accompanimental instrument. Ian Bell (apparently) was forced to admit when he reviewed the situation recently, that 'we have learned a lot since this instrument was built' - he should know, I think he was responsible for voicing it! I'm afraid that Manders would have to have startlingly good salesmen at work 24/7 to convince the cathedral authorities to throw money the same way twice - sad really, since the Mander firm has stepped up their game markedly since.

 

Even with the most subtle voicing, to have only one accompanimental division (and that a long way away) is a poor recipe for a cathedral organ. Like Gloucester (sorry to rake this one up again!), SC boasted what amounted to three hearty positive organs and one swell.

 

I think that they got it on the cheap anyway, so it does not owe anyone much! I was always amused by the wide red stripe round the tops of the white-painted wooden Trombone resontators. It is almost as if someone said, 'I wish there was a bit more colour in the Pedal Trombone' and some keen twit misunderstood! These pipes look for the all the world like giant rugby socks.

 

I visit most years and get to play the organ-substitute, which passes muster (apparently) in accompanimental mode. This would appear to be because it can die away to very little, boasts some really atmospheric noises (32' mock-flue etc.) and the speakers are near to the choir. This replacement also has a decent provision of pistons (which the previous one didn't). Why did Noel Mander so often provide too few pistons? There are several from the same period in churches with choirs with hardly any form of flexible control. Do you think that this was a nod to an early political correctness - pompous advisers (often virtual non-players) spreading the rumour that only poor players need such aids?

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I think that this is unkind to Graham Matthews.

 

The main problem with the Willis/Mander organ at Sheffield (in my humble opinion, of course) is that it was sited much too far from the choirstalls. This fault should probably be laid at the door of the cathedral architect not any musician or organ-builder.

 

The Sheffield pipe organ (incidentally virtually all still there, even if the console has been hidden away) also stands in an unsubtle acoustic, and the 70's somewhat neo-classic voicing did not endear it to listeners as an accompanimental instrument. Ian Bell (apparently) was forced to admit when he reviewed the situation recently, that 'we have learned a lot since this instrument was built' - he should know, I think he was responsible for voicing it! I'm afraid that Manders would have to have startlingly good salesmen at work 24/7 to convince the cathedral authorities to throw money the same way twice - sad really, since the Mander firm has stepped up their game markedly since.

 

Even with the most subtle voicing, to have only one accompanimental division (and that a long way away) is a poor recipe for a cathedral organ. Like Gloucester (sorry to rake this one up again!), SC boasted what amounted to three hearty positive organs and one swell.

 

I think that they got it on the cheap anyway, so it does not owe anyone much!  I was always amused by the wide red stripe round the tops of the white-painted wooden Trombone resontators.  It is almost as if someone said, 'I wish there was a bit more colour in the Pedal Trombone' and some keen twit misunderstood!  These pipes look for the all the world like giant rugby socks.

 

I visit most years and get to play the organ-substitute, which passes muster (apparently) in accompanimental mode.  This would appear to be because it can die away to very little, boasts some really atmospheric noises (32' mock-flue etc.) and the speakers are near to the choir.  This replacement also has a decent provision of pistons (which the previous one didn't).  Why did Noel Mander so often provide too few pistons?  There are several from the same period in churches with choirs with hardly any form of flexible control.  Do you think that this was a nod to an early political correctness - pompous advisers (often virtual non-players) spreading the rumour that only poor players need such aids?

 

======================

 

 

Well, fashions change, but I don't hear anyone complaining about other organs in similar cathedral buildings. Bradford is a good case in point, being a somewhat modified Hill organ . They didn't try and turn a romantic organ into a neo-baroque one, and it was about the same period, when churches still had money in the north. Bradford may not be an outstanding instrument, but it is quite a good accompaniment instrument, by and large.

 

As for positioning, I wonder if it is THAT much different to Chester Cathedral. As the crow flies (I suspect it would actually walk) there can't be much in it.

 

Other churches have equally dreadful positioning, such as Grimsby PC, where the organ is what the Americans might call "a city block away" from the choir. They make do with a small extension organ in the chancel for the purposes of accompaniment, with the "beast in the balcony" reserved for the big congregational push.

 

Of course, an obvious fact also springs to mind. People walk and organs stand, so it might have been easier to think of moving the choir at Sheffield, which would have had the added benefit of leading the congregation better.

 

I hiope I'm not being unkind to Graham Matthews. I've only met him the once, when he became highly territorial in a certain famous church in the Netherlands, for reasons which completely escape me. However, I believe that any Amglican organist, charged with securing good Anglican music, must first of all consider the home-team and the traditions associated with them.

 

That an electronic substitute is considered better fitted to the task, when the pipe organ was originally based on a Willis, tells me that the concept was utterly wrong in the first instance.

 

I don't believe that stating this is unkind, but the truth does sometimes hurt.

 

MM

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Guest Andrew Butler

http://npor.emma.cam.ac.uk/cgi-bin/Rsearch...ec_index=D05033

 

I was Organist when it was in it's previous home (All Saint's, Hawkhurst). Square stop shanks, plus visible proof that Willis didn't like wasting money on casework (don't know if it still looks the same...........?)

 

Lovely Diapasons, and the mixture had a wonderfal "tierce-y tang" to it. It would do anything you asked of it and I loved it Far better than the uncharacteristic mess Nicholson's made of St Laurence's Hawkhurst

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======================

I hope I'm not being unkind to Graham Matthews. I've only met him the once, when he became highly territorial in a certain famous church in the Netherlands, for reasons which completely escape me.

MM

 

He (Graham Matthews) did the same thing on his home territory to my previous boss (who was playing for a visiting choir). Graham Matthews stood right by him, and every time he pulled out a stop, GM gave firm reasons as to why he should not use that particular stop or combination of stops.

 

Whilst it might reasonably be supposed that the resident organist best knows the effect of his instrument in the building, my former boss is also very experienced - being regular organist with a certain symphony orchestra (with which he has toured extensively on several continents). He has also played the organs for services, recitals and concerts in many cathedrals. It might also reasonably be supposed that he, too, had some idea about registration.

 

In the end, he had to request that another cathedral organist (who was also with the choir) stand by him, in order to keep GM away from the console, since by this point, he was becoming rather dogmatic in his manner.

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I've noted on an earlier topic my own admiration of the organ in St. Michael's, Tenbury, which I would suggest as a candidate for your list.

 

St Benet Fink in Tottenham, North London is another small but outstanding example of Fr. Willis's work. I played it about 40 years ago. The stop list and other information can be found on the N P O R. Another organ in that part of the world which is/was of more than passing interest was in a rather strange church - the "Cathedral of the Good Shepherd" in Stamford Hill. The gargoyles on the exterior of the church are also worthy of comment. Both these instruments had that wonderful singing quality which makes playing them an endless pleasure.

 

John Foss

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:lol:

 

If you've got it flaunt it! What else is the "Full Organ" piston for?! :lol:

 

Absolutely! There may be some of you out there who have Maurice Forsyth-Grant's "21 years in Organ Building" in which he describes a visit we made to the organ in Notre Dame, Paris. The organ builder was in attendance, I sat at the console, he pressed the Full Organ piston and said "Jouez!" So I did.

The Cathedral was filled with tourists walking around making that hubble and bubble of sound that crowds in vast numbers make. I played the Purcell March - when I stopped the silence was deafening! My God! What a sound! What an occasion! What a memory!

 

 

John Foss

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The organ in the Parish Church of Berkswell (an attractive village near the notably unattractive ribbon development of Balsall Common in the West Midlands) has this...

 

http://npor.emma.cam.ac.uk/cgi-bin/Rsearch...ec_index=N05833

 

...which on paper looks interesting. I'm over in that area quite frequently so will attempt to have a look in the near future. I fear, though, that the church will be locked given the adjacent area's roughness. I'm sure I could ask at the vicarage to be allowed in for a look, but that might lead to an offer of playing it. After 20something years without touching a keyboard, that might be too embarrassing.

 

Keeping handsoff for the sake of others...

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Here is another similar - these small 2 man. FHW instruments are always amazingly versatile. This one was however not in brilliant condition last time I was there.

 

AJJ

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Guest Barry Williams
Here is another similar - these small 2 man. FHW instruments are always amazingly versatile. This one was however not in brilliant condition last time I was there.

 

AJJ

 

There are many 'Father' Willis organs around like this and they seem all to be absolutely superb.

 

I have never come across one that has disappointed me.

 

Barry Williams

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Unless I have missed it in the quick trawl of the thread, one not yet mentioned is the three manual at Holy Trinity, West Hill, Wandsworth. 31 speaking stops, built in 1889, and whilst it has been cleaned and maintained over the years (all by the Willis firm), hasn't been altered. It is a very good instrument, but suffers from a chancel chamber position and a general poor acoustic in the church (it would be far better down the road at All Saints!)

 

Jonathan :blink:

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