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Help With Some French Translation, Please.


Mark Taylor
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Can someone please tell me what the French word “etoffe” means when talking about organ pipes? I know what “bois” means and (I think) I know what “etain“ means (tin alloy?); but what does “etoffe” mean?

My memory immediately popped up and said: "étoffe" = "stuff" = "plain metal". But I don't know where that came from, and I can find no verification* of it! Maybe it's pure fantasy...

 

Paul

 

* <edit> Pierre's reply seems to agree, though.

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Guest Geoff McMahon
"Etoffe" means an alloy which is poor in tin, also mainly lead,

like often called simply "metal" in english.

 

Pierre

 

This is correct. It is plain metal as opposed to a mix with a high tin content. Interestingly, some old documents in England refer to plain metal as "Stuff" as well, clearly a common root here.

 

John Pike Mander

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My memory immediately popped up and said: "etoffe" = "stuff" = "plain metal".

 

I'm sure that that is because you remembered that a number of French words beginning with "e (accute) t" turn up with English counterparts beginning with "st"

 

etoil star

etude study

etranger stranger etc

 

- one of the few things I remember too about French..

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  • 2 weeks later...

The old french way to write étude was something like estude, étranger : estranger.

And indeed some people with very thick south of France accent (as my grandmother) would still pronounce "estranger", including the S pronouciation.

It's a very old love story between french and english languages. :lol:

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The old french way to write étude was something like estude, étranger : estranger.

And indeed some people with very thick south of France accent (as my grandmother) would still pronounce "estranger", including the S pronouciation.

It's a very old love story between french and english languages. <_<

 

Yes, guess how I pronounced "Balbastre" the other day, and what is more I can't pretend I'm from the South of France!

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