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Simple Recital Programme


abennett
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Hi,

 

I'm thinking of getting a good but quite simple recital programme sorted out. I have never really done this properly beofre and am a bit stuck for ideas, so far I was thinking of

 

Bach - Prelude and Fugue in C Major BWV 545

Leighton - Toccata on Hanover

Messiaen - Le Banquet Céleste

 

but am a bit lacking of other ideas, any suggestions for suitable pieces to add and if these 3 are ok to include would be useful!

 

Thanks

 

Andy

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Ending on the Messiaen? not really sure about that... a bit downcast for the end of a recital? I don't know the Leighton but just going from 'Toccata' in the title, perhaps this would be better at the end?

 

Sorry if I didn't make it clear, they are just pieces I am considering and are not in any order, I am looking for ideas of other pieces to include.

 

Thanks

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I would recommend including something substantial and Romantic. The obvious choice would be one of the Franck chorals (no.3 is the easiest) or the Pièce Héroïque . If you prefer English there's always Whitlock's Plymouth Suite.

 

For light relief Yon's L'Organo Primitivo (aka Toccatina) is an evergreen favourite.

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How long is a recital programme anyway? It could vary between 30-35 mins (a lunchtime slot, perhaps) to about 90 mins (evening recital with interval)...

What do you have in mind, Andy?

 

/edit: thinking about it some more, you are missing out on some key repertoire if you want a programme which covers most bases e.g. a Mendelssohn Sonata, some high-Romantic stuff e.g. Reger Introduktion und Passacaglia, Karg-Elert Chorale Improvisations, some neo-Classical works e.g a Hindy Sonata

 

Much of this might depend on the target instrument and indeed, what gets you going as far as learning repertoire is concerned...

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Yes but I am looking more as a long term project i.e any pieces that could be reccomended that I can then learn!

 

 

If you're asking for suggestions: You currently have a hole in the middle of your choices where some warm and attractive tunes could be.

 

I would suggest two starting points - John Stanley is one - nice native talent, there. Virtually any voluntary would be welcome to your listeners - 30 to choose from. All you need is a nice Trumpet and a nice flute, a couple of pleasant diapasons and/or a mixture with a Tierce in. Good practice for neat manual playing too.

 

Louis Vierne is the other. A couple of pieces from the famous 24 Pieces in Free Style - Carillon (de Longpont) and Berceuse, or Lied, or...

These are great for developing romantic legato and phrasing, use of swell box etc. Successful on pretty well any UK organ pre.1960 with more than 6 stops.

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If you're asking for suggestions: You currently have a hole in the middle of your choices where some warm and attractive tunes could be.

 

I would suggest two starting points - John Stanley is one - nice native talent, there. Virtually any voluntary would be welcome to your listeners - 30 to choose from. All you need is a nice Trumpet and a nice flute, a couple of pleasant diapasons and/or a mixture with a Tierce in. Good practice for neat manual playing too.

 

Louis Vierne is the other. A couple of pieces from the famous 24 Pieces in Free Style - Carillon (de Longpont) and Berceuse, or Lied, or...

These are great for developing romantic legato and phrasing, use of swell box etc. Successful on pretty well any UK organ pre.1960 with more than 6 stops.

 

Hi

 

The potential problem with Stanley (& other English composers of the era) is that they wrote for an organ with the old "long compass" manuals, going down to the G below the present bottom C standard, so you might need to fudge some passages on a modern organ. I like the Stanley vountaries - and our organ has the GG compass, but only 1 manual, no trumpet & no mixture - but even then, many of them come off pretty well.

 

Every Blessing

 

Tony

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Try the Three Tone Pieces (Op.22) by Niels Gade - he was rather a Danish Mendelssohn - not that difficult and really rather nice. There are also partitas galore by Walther, Böhm etc. which sound good on most instruments and what about 'lesser Langlais' (Prelude Modale, Priere etc.). One could go on and on..................!

 

AJJ

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