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....And so our Dulciana chorus deserves a priority!

Cornets de Viols exist in E-M. Skinner organs, which are now

gaining protection in the United States.

 

Pierre

 

 

============================

 

 

Again I would go back to the music, and ask what sort of music might use a Dulciana chorus.

 

I can't really think of anything off hand.

 

On the other hand, the string chorus (with or without Cornet de Violes) is a valid sound. By a strange co-incidence, we may find ourselves back in the territory of Arthur Harrison/Whiteley and Healey Willan.

 

I can think of absolutely nothing more stirring and even slightly menacing, than the opening of the Willan "Introduction, Passacaglia & Fuge" as originally recorded by Francis Jackson at York, where he used the Violes in chorus at York Minster, underpinned by a deliciously growling 16ft Violone. It really is one of the great moments in organ recording history.

 

Forty years and more on, that recording is still the definitive one.

 

It was also a fine alternative to a full swell effect for psalm accompaniment.

 

On the other hand, I once heard THE most over-the-top rendition (that is the right word I think) of the "Air on the G-string" by Bach, played on a huge American instrument by, I think, Ken Cowan. The way he just piles string upon string, with the Erzahlers, is quite mind-boggling, but enormously expressive and atmospheric. It's somewhere in the archives of "pipedreams" should anyone care to look it up and listen. I think the programme was entitled "Bach on the wild side."

 

Of course, the trouble with all these "limited use" choruses, is the sheer cost of them. It's a very expensive way to go orga-building.

 

MM

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Interesting comments, MM,

 

I heard it among others in Moussorgsky transcriptions at Ely,

and came back with an LP with those pieces (I still have it somewhere).

 

As for the Dulciana chorus, it is, above all, a Principal chorus, so it seems

strange there would be no use for it.

In the book I gave the link to, Bonavia-Hunt explains interesting things

about the very idea behind it all.....So I'll let you read it first.

(This idea I heard from others too in Britain. I mean the 1970's Britain,

of course).

 

Pierre

 

(Addenda. As I am a mercyfull bloke, after all, and in account of my own many sins,

in order you don't need to read a COMPLETE Bonavia-Hunt book, have a look page 112,

"3. The Choir organ")

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A good belgian Duvel for the one who gives us

a definition of "insipid"...

 

http://www.duvel.be/pages/Main.aspx?cultur...vel/introductie

 

Pierre

You might describe a Duvel beer as "Sapid", that is having a strong, pleasant taste. "Insipid" is the opposite. In my view, the Dulciana has a gentle, pleasant taste. My own Dulciana Celeste is so gentle it can almost disappear when the swell box is closed at moments such as the end of Le Banquet Celeste, which I played after the inspiration of heva's Messiaen link yesterday.

JC

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"in my view, the Dulciana has a gentle, pleasant taste. My own Dulciana Celeste is so gentle it can almost disappear when the swell box is closed at moments such as the end of Le Banquet Celeste, which I played after the inspiration of heva's Messiaen link "

(Quote).

 

This quite interesting comment deserves a Duvel as well.

 

Pierre

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