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Barbara Dennerlein Wants To Perform Pipe-organ


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Guest spottedmetal

Dear All

 

Following my post about the nightclub generation, and the encouragement from MusingMuso I pointed Barbara Dennerlein to the discussion and she has responded . . . .

 

Barbara is veering towards doing very exciting things with the pipe organ but my post about this was diverted by people who appeared much more disamused by my unconventional methods of producing 1812 explosions :lol: . I suppose, intending to cause fun havoc and pandemonium at our forthcoming jamboree, :o I shouldn't have been at all surprised at people causing havoc to the logic of my post :lol: and getting distracted from the serious issue of bringing the pipe organ into 21st century culture. :lol:

 

Barbara has replied:

Thank you! Do you promote pipe organ concerts? I would love to come and play pipe organ concerts in England.

 

Would any other venues be interested in booking her so that she could do a worthwhile tour within a few days in England?

 

I'd also like to get over

Eric Dalest from the south of France to do some recitals and improvisation masterclasses and

Raúl Prieto Ramírez from the National Concert Hall in Madrid.

 

I'm sure that an international approach to promoting the pipe organ and its repertoire will be capable of generating excitement among audiences but to make the travelling worthwhile, it's necessary to pull together.

 

Is anyone daring enough to consider seeing what we can do?

 

Best wishes

 

David P

 

 

Encouragement from MM:

Indeed, were some organists to demonstrate that the spirit of Barbara Dennerlein

is possible on the pipe organ, which with mutations and mixtures it is, they might prevent the onslaught of the happy-clappies throwing the organ out.

 

 

 

===============================

 

 

Isn't she just superb?

 

I think my favourite is "Rankett Rag" closely followed by "A'int misbehavin'"

 

MM

 

Quote about Barbara which was diverted by 1812 bangs:

Delighted to hear of support for Carlo and acknowledging the need for more. A great mutual friend hearing a CD of our last concert has tipped Hugh Potton to be capable of being the next Carlo, and I have tried to introduce them to do some duets.

 

I have just posted an update on the Organ to be Hated or Loved which will be of great amusement to some . . . Teddybears Picnic is certainly not the nightclub generation, definitely the tea-dance category, and one of my favourites on the organ since the age of 12.

 

Does anyone else play it on their organ? Clearly others in the past have wanted to be a bit more contemporary, and I was pleased to see Gershwin being taught on organ at Eton then. This is clearly a momentum we need to keep going.

 

Has anyone else come across Barbara Dennerlein who I mentioned the other day? It looks as though she is bringing her technique across to the classical in her collaboration with an orchestra. This crossing-boundaries approach has mileage . . .

http://www.barbaradennerlein.com/en/news/index.php

In fact, I see that she is doing things not just with Hammond but her itinerary includes at least two concerts on "church organ":

http://www.barbaradennerlein.com/en/itinerary/index.php Wouldn't it be wonderful to get her doing a tour over here in England??? Where first?

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Barbara has replied:

Would any other venues be interested in booking her so that she could do a worthwhile tour within a few days in England?

 

I'd also like to get over

Eric Dalest from the south of France to do some recitals and improvisation masterclasses and

Raúl Prieto Ramírez from the National Concert Hall in Madrid.

 

I'm sure that an international approach to promoting the pipe organ and its repertoire will be capable of generating excitement among audiences but to make the travelling worthwhile, it's necessary to pull together.

 

Is anyone daring enough to consider seeing what we can do?

 

Best wishes

 

David P

 

 

Would she be interested in Cardiff at all?

 

Peter

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:blink: Stunning. Simply stunning. I could watch and listen to her all night.

 

 

========================

 

I'm so glad a serious musician agrees with me. Whether light or classical, she brings such freshness to the music. As for the "light organ" style, it's quite difficult to categorise, and certainly makes a nonsense of those who think that such music doesn't work on a straight pipe-organ.

 

It's a sort of broad jazz-style, but I find hints of what the late Bryan Rodwell used to do, with extensive use of very mobile pedalling. Lots of walking basses and a wonderful use of both syncopation and silences.

 

Her playing is certainly hugely enjoyable, and would be very well received by most audiences, I would have thought.

 

I once wrote out an organ jazz version of "Jeepers Creepers" which works well on classical pipe-organ, and whilst the style is very different from what the good lady does, it uses similar types of musical techniques.

 

Needless to say, she's better than I am at this sort of thing!

 

MM

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========================

 

I'm so glad a serious musician agrees with me.

:D You flatter me! (Never been called that before.) I think she's fabulous. Sad to see the occasional sanctimonious comment below some of the YouTube clips - this lady certainly has technique.

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:D You flatter me! (Never been called that before.) I think she's fabulous. Sad to see the occasional sanctimonious comment below some of the YouTube clips - this lady certainly has technique.

 

She does things with one foot that I couldn't do with three :lol: .

 

But I agree she is remarkable.

 

Peter

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She is certainly remarkable. However, I am not sure that I could listen to a Hammond B3 all night.

 

Are there any clips of her playing classical organ music (for want of a better term) ?

Not quite, but "Watch Pedal Power" - 2nd clip here includes a brief excerpt on a pipe organ, and very tasty it is too.

 

I know what you mean re Hammonds, but there's enough variety (and sheer energy) in her playing and registration to sustain the interest of the dourest vegan Robertsbridge Codex fan, in my humble submission...

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Not quite, but "Watch Pedal Power" - 2nd clip here includes a brief excerpt on a pipe organ, and very tasty it is too.

 

I know what you mean re Hammonds, but there's enough variety (and sheer energy) in her playing and registration to sustain the interest of the dourest vegan Robertsbridge Codex fan, in my humble submission...

 

OK- thank you, Ian. I will check these out later. Whilst they are not blocked here in school, I have not yet established which of the three hundred leads are attached to the other ends of the speakers on this computer in this studio.

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She is certainly remarkable. However, I am not sure that I could listen to a Hammond B3 all night.

 

Are there any clips of her playing classical organ music (for want of a better term) ?

 

 

========================

 

 

If you want to hear the lady play rather than undress her with your eyes on "You Tube", go search "Pipedreams" from Minnesota Public Radio, then search under the name Dennerlein or Barbara Dennerlien.

 

There are some excellent examples of her playing, including the wonderful "Rankett Blues" and "Aint' Misbehavin' "which I mentioned; both played on classical pipe organ.

 

Here are a couple of links:-

 

http://pipedreams.publicradio.org/listings/2006/0603/

 

http://www.barbaradennerlein.com/en/

 

Even the playing opened my eyes, without feeling the need for "You Tube"....still....in my case......... :D

 

MM

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She is certainly remarkable. However, I am not sure that I could listen to a Hammond B3 all night.

 

Are there any clips of her playing classical organ music (for want of a better term) ?

Further to all the above, click HERE - scroll down til you see the CD 'Spiritual Movement No 1' and listen to the freebies. The Pipedreams programme cited above is well worth a listen too. BD is on around the 54 minute mark. It's incredible how a Goll Pedal 'cello/principal sounds like the Hammond pedal stops she uses for the string bass parts! You can see it's been a productive afternoon at work... :)

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Further to all the above, click HERE - scroll down til you see the CD 'Spiritual Movement No 1' and listen to the freebies. The Pipedreams programme cited above is well worth a listen too. BD is on around the 54 minute mark. It's incredible how a Goll Pedal 'cello/principal sounds like the Hammond pedal stops she uses for the string bass parts! You can see it's been a productive afternoon at work... :)

 

 

Thanks Ian - I was quite amuused to note that on most recordings she is credited with playing Hammond organ and "footpedals" (are there any other kind?). But don't all Hammonds have pedals (of a sort)?

 

Peter

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Thanks Ian - I was quite amuused to note that on most recordings she is credited with playing Hammond organ and "footpedals" (are there any other kind?). But don't all Hammonds have pedals (of a sort)?

 

Peter

 

Hi

 

Back in the 1970's or thereabouts Hammond marketed the "Hammond Piper" - some sort of chord organ - and that had no pedalboard. Also, I suspect that the rock music fraternity, etc. don't cart the to them rdundant pedals of their B-3's around.

 

Every Blessing

 

Tony

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Guest spottedmetal
Back in the 1970's or thereabouts Hammond marketed the "Hammond Piper" - some sort of chord organ - and that had no pedalboard. Also, I suspect that the rock music fraternity, etc. don't cart the to them rdundant pedals of their B-3's around.

Oh dear . . . I'm beginning to feel queasy! :) It's my impression that Hammond's pedalboard options dropped with the introduction of non-tonewheel transistorification . . . :) where tones were generated with transistor oscillators rather than electro-mechanically.

 

Ancient Hammonds should perhaps not be spurned - they were remarkable, in particular for longevity on account of their essentially mechanical way of generating sound. There was the earliest Model B on Ebay recently, from memory dating from 1935. This had only a single swell pedal and 25 note pedalboard. We have a 1937 Model E here with 32 note R&C pedalboard and the rare second set of tonewheels as a chorus generator and is so heavy as to be virtually immovable. It's still going strong having not celebrated its 80th birthday last year as no-one wanted to give it an outing :( .

 

Anyway, I hope that this thread might continue not on the intricacies of Hammonds - which could be covered on the toaster or the house organ threads but on the possibilities of discussing getting Barbara Dennerlein over for a concert tour. The hunch is that she is a real mover and a shaker in being able to get the younger generation exploring the excitement of learning organ technique and must be capable of being viewed as "cool".

 

A tour on pipe organs would mean that she would not have to cart 1/2 ton beasts across the channel, which would make a tour expensive.

 

Does anyone have budget for recitals? (I gathered that a major venue for organ recitals west of London has a negative budget this year on account of poor audiences . . . )

 

Does anyone have a musical charity that would be eligible for arts council sponsorship?

 

Best wishes

 

Spottedmetal

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Anyway, I hope that this thread might continue not on the intricacies of Hammonds - which could be covered on the toaster or the house organ threads but on the possibilities of discussing getting Barbara Dennerlein over for a concert tour. Spottedmetal

I'm afraid the way in which threads develop in this forum is down to the contributors, not your personal preference. It is part of the charm of the site. I get the impression with your many zealous postings that you wish to dominate this forum with your ideas. I know that I and some other regular contributors are beginning to find it a bit tiresome.

John Carter (one of the stuffy generation)

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I'm afraid the way in which threads develop in this forum is down to the contributors, not your personal preference. It is part of the charm of the site. I get the impression with your many zealous postings that you wish to dominate this forum with your ideas. I know that I and some other regular contributors are beginning to find it a bit tiresome.

John Carter (one of the stuffy generation)

 

We all get ideas we feel excited and even evangelical about and since the organ is something of a minority interest in the modern world there are few places to excercise one's enthusiasm, but this forum is one of them. We get it free thanks to the generosity of John Mander and the moderating team. In the past they have been censorious for reasons they have felt valid yet they do not seem to have reached that point with this thread. Indeed I have seen other pleas to return to the original topic many times here on other threads.

 

I think the best thing is to enjoy the discussion, go with its flow and only if something is really offensive - an attack on one's religon, race, sexual orientaton &c - should we start getting concerned.

 

Best wishes

 

Peter

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Guest spottedmetal
I'm afraid the way in which threads develop in this forum is down to the contributors, not your personal preference. It is part of the charm of the site. I get the impression with your many zealous postings that you wish to dominate this forum with your ideas. I know that I and some other regular contributors are beginning to find it a bit tiresome.

 

Very sorry. No offence intended and I'll curl up and go away.

 

I tried to show a human face by the delightful choice of symbols ;) provided by the medium of this board . . . and genially went along with the discussion about Hammonds, which can be fun, and contributed an expression of shock about their longevity . . . but returned politely to the subject of the thread with links to other areas with relevance to Hammonds (they are, after all, brilliant with those top drawbars for playing 18th century music if otherwise one only has an octopod . . . (but I wouldn't dare start a thread on the subject) ) in order to keep focus on a line of thought which might result in wider appreciation of the pipe organ as an instrument.

 

The provision of this board by the hard efforts of Mr Mander and his team is a really wonderful catalyst to maintaining interest in the pipe-organ and more, encouraging its preservation and promotion. To not raise issues of discussion or not express points of view (with the expectation that other expertise might rightly contradict and stimulate further thought) would mean lack of success in that enterprise and intention and our position in the parable of the talents comes to mind. Isn't life is very unstimulating if everyone is in total agreement all the time, and no progression is achieved thereby? For that reason, even the contemplation of the outrageous plays its part in the reality-check that ensues: in its absence 1984 takes hold.

 

In seeing the numbers of instruments that are being destroyed by neglect, disinterest, willful vandalism, as well as the actions of poorly informed committees who replace pipes by toasters, as well as others who simply follow fashions, we are on the edge of a cataclysmic loss of heritage, culture and knowledge, together with the loss of wonderful and enjoyable music.

 

If we are able to do something positive, then perhaps isn't it our duty to do it?

 

Virgil Fox and Sir George-Thalben ball, the latter long forgotten by the current generation, were able to do something about it and Carlo Curley continues to fly the flag. It's a pleasure now to see the possibility of new organists coming forward and Barbara Dennerlein is potentially such an inspiration! It's wonderful to see many here with enthusiasm for her.

 

Indeed I had been terrified to mention her in such hallowed ground as here . . . jazz . . . and coming over from a Hammond! Outrage! I had expected it :blink: .

 

With best wishes

 

Spottedmetal

 

PS. It's a pleasure to have found outrage only in my Clarion call and not in the foundation of the subject raised - sorry - it goes with my taste for Ophicliedes which vegetarian instruments can't supply :)

 

Quote: "What do you regret not having done in your life?" - "Getting to Staplefield Convent a week earlier!"

 

A tour on pipe organs would mean that she would not have to cart 1/2 ton beasts across the channel, which would make a tour expensive.

 

Does anyone have budget for recitals? (I gathered that a major venue for organ recitals west of London has a negative budget this year on account of poor audiences . . . )

 

Does anyone have a musical charity that would be eligible for arts council sponsorship?

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Very sorry. No offence intended and I'll curl up and go away.

Dear David,

I'm sure we don't want you to go away, just draw the Bourdon Doux rather than the Ophicleide occasionally. We have received and understood your message.

 

Returning to the topic, you seem to overlook the fact that there are some very fine, young, home-grown performers who contribute to this board. To suggest that Arts Council funding should be used to finance entertainers from overseas does offend me, particularly with the current pressure on arts budgets.

JC

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John Mander and the moderating team. In the past they have been censorious for reasons they have felt valid yet they do not seem to have reached that point with this thread. Indeed I have seen other pleas to return to the original topic many times here on other threads.

 

The moderating team has for several days been watching a number of threads similar to this one with mounting concern at what sometimes comes too close to exploitation of this forum, and the goodwill of its participants, by one fairly new member.

 

Moderator, Mander Organs

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Guest spottedmetal
Returning to the topic, you seem to overlook the fact that there are some very fine, young, home-grown performers who contribute to this board. To suggest that Arts Council funding should be used to finance entertainers from overseas does offend me, particularly with the current pressure on arts budgets.

 

Dear John

 

Firstly thank you for your kind words about the Bourdon - point taken and understood.

 

Yes - I'm sure that we are in wholehearted agreement about home-grown performers and Arts funding. However, I hope that you might forgive me for sounding more like a Gamba than a Bourdon in spawning some further discussion here for the reason that when we think of Arts funding, the organ does not immediately spring to mind and perhaps were we to seek more impact in such an arena the instrument would achieve a higher profile.

 

On the question, in this instance, of whether this overseas performer is competing with any at home or whether she is offering more one might arguably ignore other attributes which this particular performer brings in terms of new music and enthusiasm from a new generation. In particular she brings technique which offers something to give to home performers with which others have demonstrated difficulty in a very different musical arena.

 

This is demonstrated in a question publicly put to Carlo Curley * - "To heel or not to heel . . . that is the question". Carlo replied with an anecdote about a top teacher coming to grief on all toes in the first bar of some Bach in attempts to revert to a pedalling style which is considered to be "more authentic".

 

The strength of success in such pedal technique may lie either with the requirements of her music or possibly with the exploitation of the very weakness of the construction of the instrument on which she has practiced for years, her technique having developed to overcome the instrument's weakness.

 

This may be worthy of investigation. Even in its 32 note R&C construction, perhaps the Hammond pedalboard offers a different feel from the conventional, softer springing and possibly lower less well defined sharps, so making conventional note location and heel technique more difficult and less reliable?

 

Best wishes,

 

Spottedmetal

 

 

* http://www.carlo.com/pages/AskCarlo.asp?Ac...;ThreadID=10478

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Dear David,

I'm sure we don't want you to go away, just draw the Bourdon Doux rather than the Ophicleide occasionally. We have received and understood your message.

 

Returning to the topic, you seem to overlook the fact that there are some very fine, young, home-grown performers who contribute to this board. To suggest that Arts Council funding should be used to finance entertainers from overseas does offend me, particularly with the current pressure on arts budgets.

JC

 

 

===========================

 

I have sympathy with this, but only so far.

 

Some of our greatest artistic achievements have been the result of "foreign" influence, and I have no doubt but that it works both ways. Art has always had international currency, and music perhaps more so than most mediums.

 

It is far more worrying when funding is thrown away on the sort of rubbish we see so often in what I can only describe as "street theatre," and "bashing dustbin-lids," as if it is the right of every citizen to express themselves in whatever way they think AND GET PAID FOR IT.

 

If I had a straight choice to make ("straight" being an unfortunate choice of word), between main-stream art and a street-theatre act which involved two large-sized women dressed in cat-suits (fat-cat suits), hurling a large, soft, stuffed-dummy around, and falling upon it like Sumo wrestlers periodically, I know which I would choose. As an arts-event, I thought it a "bit of a waste" of public funding; especially since I couldn't make the slightest sense of it. It was explained to me that it was an "artistic statement" of lesbian feminism, directed against male aggression and domination. I felt none the wiser for knowing that, but at least I was marginally better informed.

 

As we are part of Europe, I don't have a problem with funding being used to introduce GOOD art from anywhere, but there have to be controls on the sort of quality on which we are being asked to spend money.

 

I don't want to harp on about Barbara Dennerlein, but at least she is unique, extremely able and rather rivetting entertainment. Like it or loathe it, her art (which is what it is), has much to teach us.

 

However, art-funding IS important to up-and-coming performers, and without it, all sorts of talent can go un-noticed.

 

No-one could remain unmoved by the young pianist who cleaned floors at Glasgow University, and turned out to be a superb pianist?

 

Aleksander Kudajczyk is one of those rare "finds," and as good an example as any of the way that talent can remain hidden when funds are not there to encourage it.

 

I think we need to take a balanced view, and put pressure on those who hold the purse-strings.

 

I suspect that when a man can build a brick-wall and have it displayed at "The Tate," while more serious artists flee abroad, the business of art has become highly suspect.

 

What we don't want is financial corruption in art, and misuse of funding.

 

MM

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===========================

I don't want to harp on about Barbara Dennerlein, but at least she is unique, extremely able and rather rivetting entertainment. Like it or loathe it, her art (which is what it is), has much to teach us.

I don't want to drone on either. I agree Barbara Dennerlein is entertaining and attractive, but hardly unique. I admire her skill, but I think to describe it as art is going a step too far.

JC

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I don't want to drone on either. I agree Barbara Dennerlein is entertaining and attractive, but hardly unique. I admire her skill, but I think to describe it as art is going a step too far.

JC

 

 

==============================

 

 

I would have thought that anyone who creates music which no-one else plays, is quite possibly unique.

 

I don't know what I would describe as art; I'm not clever enough.

 

MM

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==============================

I don't know what I would describe as art; I'm not clever enough.

 

MM

I disagree. You have described and linked to performances from Haarlem in the past that show quite stunning artistry. Alain at St. Bavo comes to mind. I don't dislike Barbara Dennerlein, in fact I think she's great, but not in the class of some of those performers you have introduced us to in the past.

JC

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I disagree. You have described and linked to performances from Haarlem in the past that show quite stunning artistry. Alain at St. Bavo comes to mind. I don't dislike Barbara Dennerlein, in fact I think she's great, but not in the class of some of those performers you have introduced us to in the past.

JC

 

 

========================

 

Well, we've from "non-art" to "not great art," which can only be a good thing. As someone who plays both classical and light music, I find myself asking whether Bach could ever have been a Gershwin, or whether Gershwin could ever have been a Bach, and I come up against a brick-wall.

 

That's why I'm not clever enough.

 

MM

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