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The mention in another post of the organ scholarship at Windsor prompts me to ask whether anyone can tell me who held the post during the following years:

 

1976-7 (between Thomas Trotter and Adrian Partington)

1988-9 (between Roger Muttit and Philip Scriven)

1996-7 and 1997-8 (one or two people between Iain Farrington and Teilhard Scott)

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Guest Barry Williams
The mention in another post of the organ scholarship at Windsor prompts me to ask whether anyone can tell me who held the post during the following years:

 

1976-7 (between Thomas Trotter and Adrian Partington)

1988-9 (between Roger Muttit and Philip Scriven)

1996-7 and 1997-8 (one or two people between Iain Farrington and Teilhard Scott)

 

The organ scholar between Iain Farrington and Teilhard Scott was probably Miles Hartley.

 

I understand that Mr Teilhard Scott is now an airline pilot, flying for Exel Airways in Bangkok or Bahrain.

 

Barry Williams

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The organ scholar between Iain Farrington and Teilhard Scott was probably Miles Hartley.

 

I understand that Mr Teilhard Scott is now an airline pilot, flying for Exel Airways in Bangkok or Bahrain.

 

Barry Williams

 

............and presumably earing a damn site more dosh, I wouldn't wonder!

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Guest spottedmetal
............and presumably earing a damn site more dosh, I wouldn't wonder!

I know another organist of outstanding brilliance who has taken to driving Great Western express trains. Apart from the dosh, one has the feeling that driving organs, trains, juggernauts and A380s all have something in common? Others drive university departments, whole divisions of the NHS or are delegated to drive teams of people in darkest countries, Albert Schweitzer style.

 

Upon entering Imperial College, a contemporary of mine asked "What do people do after Physics", to which the admissions tutor replied "Anything . . . Physics teaches you how to think". So, in my view, does organ playing. It's the most valuable training to exercise thought in parallel directions, and reaching parts of the brain that others cannot. I'm sure that regular organ playing is the best antedote to senility. Has anyone had any similar hunches? Have you ever met a senile organist?

 

May we all die on the bench . . . and encourage organ scholarship to promote such health benefits. Is there a case for getting the NHS to fund organ lessons at schools? ;)

 

Best wishes

 

Spot

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I know another organist of outstanding brilliance who has taken to driving Great Western express trains. Apart from the dosh, one has the feeling that driving organs, trains, juggernauts and A380s all have something in common?

Rumour has it that Erik Wm Suter, until recently Organist/ADoM at Washington National Cathedral, is training to be an airline pilot (being already a private pilot).

 

Have you ever met a senile organist?

Yes!! More than one over the years. But I'm not going to identify them.

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I understand that Mr Teilhard Scott is now an airline pilot, flying for Exel Airways in Bangkok or Bahrain.

 

Rumour has it that Erik Wm Suter, until recently Organist/ADoM at Washington National Cathedral, is training to be an airline pilot (being already a private pilot).

Must be all those people who stroll up and comment on the console looking like an aeroplane cockpit.

 

Mr Briggs is a keen aviator too.

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Must be all those people who stroll up and comment on the console looking like an aeroplane cockpit.

 

Mr Briggs is a keen aviator too.

 

=============================

 

 

 

I think I came out with a good reply to the American lady who did just that at St.Brides, Fleet Street.

 

"Oh my! It's like looking at a Boeing 747" (Note: they never say "Airbus" do they?)

 

"That's right. I can never understand why they need so many people at the controls."

 

=====

 

Doesn't the good Mr Briggs also own a power-boat?

 

MM

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Must be all those people who stroll up and comment on the console looking like an aeroplane cockpit.

 

Mr Briggs is a keen aviator too.

The same Mr. Briggs has an excellent picture of a large jet flight-deck equipped with a Cavaille-Coll console :lol:

 

I must admit that the feeling of controlling an airport is similar to that of playing a large, exciting but occasionally temperamental organ, the obvious difference being that I'm allowed to make mistakes when playing the organ... and I do :rolleyes:

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And the gent. from the RCO who runs Gatwick - organ and aviation - an interesting link!

 

Paul Griffiths FRCO, who was a co-opted member of the RCO Council and a member of the Executive Committe, left last September to take up the role of CEO of Dubai Airports where he is now masterminding the building of a new international airport. While in the UK, he served as Executive Commercial Director of Virgin Trains before becoming Managing Director of BAA Gatwick. Away from the office, he played regularly for services at Guildford Cathedral. In recognition of his RCO work before moving to the Middle East, he was made a Vice-President of the College.

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  • 9 months later...

Airbus introduced the "fly by wire"-technique for civil aircraft, so this would correspondent to electric action. More precisely, it would be electrohydraulic... (Maybe some swell shutters would not stand a 1000psi-power actuator....)

What about lovers of tracker action and flexible wind?

They would have to turn to all those Cessnas, Beechcrafts and so on...

 

And those who do historic fingering and love meantone temperament?

 

Double-decker cabrios (planes, I mean) without canopies...

 

Playing NotreDame de Paris in those days, when the new Synaptel computers did not yet work properly, might have reminded to flying an A380 with failure of all hydraulic systems, main engines and APU...

We're lucky (or not) that we do not have all these automated cockpit things like voices, sirens and blinking lights that are going to start when the plane is coming close to ground, going down to steeple and so on...

 

But I love to imagine such systems on organ consoles and beginning to make their noise when a player started a piece too fast and the really difficult middle section ist just a few measures away... :P

or error messages when hymn sheet and played tune do differ... and when all those things start to happen which have been listed here some months ago in the police radio abbreviations topic....

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