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Beverley Recital


Peter Allison
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I have just been to the last concert in the Beverley Minster summer series, and what a marvelous one it was too. Alan Spedding really "pulled all the stops out" (well, nearly all) How nice it was to hear a well put together programe of english, french and german music and played to Alans usual high standard. May I take this opportunity to recomend James Lancelots recital at Beverley on 15th october, to include (so mr.Spedding told me) Viernes fifth.

And the reason for the "mistakes" during Francis Jacksons recital at York the other day, was because his shoe came of during the F Major pedal solo,( as told by Francis to my friend David Rogers from sunny Donny ( doncaster <_< )

Peter

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  • 2 weeks later...
I have just been to the last concert in the Beverley Minster  summer series, and what a marvelous one it was too. Alan Spedding really "pulled all the stops out" (well, nearly all) How nice it was to hear a well put together programe  of english, french and german music and played to Alans usual  high standard. May I take this opportunity to recomend James Lancelots recital at Beverley on 15th october, to include (so mr.Spedding told me) Viernes fifth.

        And the reason for the "mistakes" during Francis Jacksons recital at York the other day, was because his shoe came of during the F Major pedal solo,( as told by Francis to my friend David Rogers from sunny Donny ( doncaster ;)  )

Peter

 

Glad to hear you enjoyed Dr Spedding's recital, what did he play? I worked with him for 3 years and he is such a great man. As for him pulling out all the stops, that suprises me because he was not the 'loudest' player; when one of my predecessors at the minster used the great Posaune during a hymn, Alan ran upstairs and pushed it in!!

The monthly recitals in Beverley do really well, it is defenately worth anyone going along to them to hear the glorious organ and the amazing acoustics. I'll never forget my time there :)

As for Dr Jackson's shoe falling off... if he uses Organmaster Shoes then it wouldn't suprise me as I have had my new pair for nearly 2 years and the laces on both shoes have snapped!!! :o

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Guest Roffensis
Glad to hear you enjoyed Dr Spedding's recital, what did he play? I worked with him for 3 years and he is such a great man. As for him pulling out all the stops, that suprises me because he was not the 'loudest' player; when one of my predecessors at the minster used the great Posaune during a hymn, Alan ran upstairs and pushed it in!!

The monthly recitals in Beverley do really well, it is defenately worth anyone going along to them to hear the glorious organ and the amazing acoustics. I'll never forget my time there  :)

As for Dr Jackson's shoe falling off... if he uses Organmaster Shoes then it wouldn't suprise me as I have had my new pair for nearly 2 years and the laces on both shoes have snapped!!!  ;)

 

 

Yes I agree, Spedding has always been a most conservative player. He always struck me by the colours he gets from playing, and he certainly does not charm by power. It's very easy to pull all the stops out, but the true organist will take much time to find balance and musicality, and above all not rely on what he hears at the console. I was taught by Richard Lea, and he would go to great pains to instruct on how not to use an organ. Individual stops, not yanking out swell to great automatically, aviodance of thick textures, adherance to composers intentions, listening to the building and so on, all these things take time and experience to learn. Aural fatique and monotony set in very quickly, and variety is the key, and being careful is the door to decent playing.

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Guest Leathered-Lips
Yes I agree, Spedding has always been a most conservative player. He always struck me by the colours he gets from playing, and he certainly does not charm by power. It's very easy to pull all the stops out, but the true organist will take much time to find balance and musicality, and above all not rely on what he hears at the console. I was taught by Richard Lea, and he would go to great pains to instruct on how not to use an organ. Individual stops, not yanking out swell to great automatically, aviodance of thick textures, adherance to composers intentions, listening to the building and so on, all these things take time and experience to learn. Aural fatique and monotony set in very quickly, and variety is the key, and being careful is the door to decent playing.

 

..or occasionally replacing the 8' dulciana with a choir 8' flute just to make sure we don't get too excited and enjoy ourselves too much :)

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Guest Barry Oakley
Yes I agree, Spedding has always been a most conservative player.

 

I have heard Alan Spedding on a number of occasions, and whilst he is a competent organist he lacks that sparkle that one associates with organists that have flair. I never come away from his recitals feeling I've attended a memorable performance. But Alan Spedding the composer is something altogether different. His works are usually very fulfilling, especially when played by an outstanding recitalist

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The Beverley organ is a marvelous "piece of kit" and a real yorkshire treasure. When I first moved to Hull a few years ago, I thought I would miss the Durham Cathedral organ, and the Shakespear pub, but after a few visits to Beverley recitals I was won over (oh, and a few in the Monks Walk helped too :) ). Alan is a first rate player, and after all these years spent in the minster, still puts on good programme that pleases nearly everyone.

Peter

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Guest Roffensis
The Beverley organ is a marvelous "piece of kit" and a real yorkshire treasure. When I first moved to Hull a few years ago, I thought I would miss the Durham Cathedral  organ, and the Shakespear pub,  but after a few visits to Beverley recitals I was won over (oh, and a few in the Monks Walk  helped too :rolleyes: ). Alan is a first rate player, and after all these years spent in the minster, still puts on  good programme that pleases nearly everyone.

Peter

 

Deffo, and Beverly is for my money a far more musical organ that Durham. The way the Hill pipework blends with the Snetzler is no mean thing either.

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We should be grateful for Peter Allison for bringing Alan Spedding's recital to our attention as so many posts relate to instruments and so few to the people that actually play them. I was a student at Hull and can confirm the consensus view that Alan Spedding is a conservative player and is not inclined to such vulgarities as reharmonising the last verse of hymns. However, he is a man whose playing is informed by consumate taste and musicianship.

 

One other player who deserves praise is John Scott Whiteley who, in 2006, will have served as 30 as Assistant Organist at York. It is hard to think of another organist whose talents range so widely. There is a post on another page complaining about the narrow range of repertoire of concert organists. JSW seems to have an almost unlimited repertoire. He is known to a wider TV audience for his Bach playing; his scholarship on Jongen earned him a PhD; he transcribes Cocherau improvisations and his playing of the French masters such as Franck and Durufle is renowned.

 

However, it is in his daily work at York Minster where his talent is best served. His sensitive and inspired psalm accompaniment, his strong hymn playing and gift for extemporisation as well as his work in directing the girl's choir as well his as his recital work surely mark him out as one of the most significant chuch musicians of our time.

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We should be grateful for Peter Allison for bringing Alan Spedding's recital to our attention as so many posts relate to instruments and so few to the people that actually play them. I was a student at Hull and can confirm the consensus view that Alan Spedding is a conservative player and is not inclined to such vulgarities as reharmonising the last verse of hymns.  However, he is a man whose playing is informed by consumate taste and musicianship.

 

One other player who deserves praise is John Scott Whiteley who, in 2006, will have served as 30 as Assistant Organist at York. It is hard to think of another organist whose talents range so widely. There is a post on another page complaining about the narrow range of repertoire of concert organists. JSW seems to have an almost unlimited repertoire. He is known to a wider TV audience for his Bach playing; his scholarship on Jongen earned him a PhD; he transcribes Cocherau improvisations and his playing of the French masters such as Franck and Durufle is renowned.

 

However, it is in his daily work at York Minster where his talent is best served. His sensitive and inspired psalm accompaniment, his strong hymn playing and gift for extemporisation as well as his work in directing the girl's choir as well his as his recital work surely mark him out as one of the most significant chuch musicians of our time.

Why thank you, I am one of many who loves "the King of Instuments" (to coin a phrase, )but do not play said said instument :lol: I have the utmost respect for those of you who do, including my father, who at 74 and a bit, still plays for the local chapel and is on the local "crem" rota). whilst I do not play, I take a great deal of notice of what is played at recitals and how the pieces compare to other players interpretations.

Peter

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I was a student at Hull and can confirm the consensus view

 

Do we have any statisticians on this site ? The reason I ask is that the proportion of former Hull students in a sample of 235/6 people seems extraordinarily high (about 1.7%). Myself, Parsfan, Richard McVeigh and MM I know of -anyone else care to own up ? And that does not take into account those like Paul Derrett who have other associations with the town. Is this the figure that one would expect or is Hull over represented on this site ?

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I was a student at Hull and can confirm the consensus view

 

Do we have any statisticians on this site ? The reason I ask is that the proportion of former Hull students in a sample of 235/6 people seems extraordinarily high (about 1.7%). Myself, Parsfan, Richard McVeigh and MM I know of -anyone else care to own up ? And that does not take into account those like Paul Derrett who have other associations with the town. Is this the figure that one would expect or is Hull over represented on this site ?

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Guest Barry Oakley
I was a student at Hull and can confirm the consensus view

 

Do we have any statisticians on this site ? The reason I ask is that the proportion of former Hull students in a sample of 235/6 people seems extraordinarily high (about 1.7%). Myself, Parsfan, Richard McVeigh and MM I know of -anyone else care to own up ? And that does not take into account those like Paul Derrett who have other associations with the town. Is this the figure that one would expect or is Hull over represented on this site ?

 

I'm not a statistician, but simply add my name to a list as someone with strong connections with Hull where I joined the choir at Holy Trinity as a boy chorister in 1948.

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I'm not a statistician, but simply add my name to a list as someone with strong connections with Hull where I joined the choir at Holy Trinity as a boy chorister in 1948.

I lived in Hull (Cottingham) for 1o years and have a butchers shop in Goole, I now live near Easingwold (York). Hull is a great place, with some marvelous churches and organs.

Peter

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