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Guest Leathered-Lips

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Guest Leathered-Lips

Are there any enlightened organ builders out there who could perhaps invent some new "musical" organ stops which could be developed to a chorus? A completely new pipe-organ sound, although preferably not drawing on sitars, bongos and the like.

 

I may be wrong but I havn't heard of a single and significantly different family of stops having been invented for quite a number of years.

 

Anyone wish to correct me?

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Are there any enlightened organ builders out there who could perhaps invent some new "musical" organ stops which could be developed to a chorus? A completely new pipe-organ sound, although preferably not drawing on sitars, bongos and the like.

 

I may be wrong but I havn't heard of a single and significantly different family of stops having been invented for quite a number of years.

 

Anyone wish to correct me?

 

If you want to create a new stop:

 

-Either it has a strong personnality, it is then a solist not intended

for choruses

 

-If you want to build choruses, what you need is pure organ-tone,

so Diapasons.

The british organ-builders, leading worldwide in that matter, provided us

with almost every conceivable version.

 

(By the way, the gentlest Diapason I know, very suitable for choruses, may hide

behind your hand bag!)

Best wishes,

Pierre

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Guest Roffensis
Are there any enlightened organ builders out there who could perhaps invent some new "musical" organ stops which could be developed to a chorus? A completely new pipe-organ sound, although preferably not drawing on sitars, bongos and the like.

 

I may be wrong but I havn't heard of a single and significantly different family of stops having been invented for quite a number of years.

 

Anyone wish to correct me?

 

They built a whole new sound at Oxford. :rolleyes::blink:

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Guest Leathered-Lips
They built a whole new sound at Oxford. :rolleyes:  :lol:

 

:blink: well, yes :angry:

 

It would be interesting if they built an authentic pipe organ with some purely digital sounds in it as well. (NOT toaster imitations of athentic pipe organ sounds). I wonder if it's ever been really carried through ever and in a professional and thoughtful manner?

 

Pure traditional organ tone mixed with synth sounds could in theory produce some new and interesting effects. I know there are electronics which mix the two, but is there any esentially PIPE organ anywhere with "Synth Strings" on the Swell as well as the pipe version? It could open up a whole new and interesting level of interesting things, if well thought out and the two made to complement each other. I'm sure the digital sounds could be adjusted to move with the pipe tuning by some kind of computer sensor to each pipe?

 

Seems in general organ builders have looked at past instruments and reverted to building in the old conservative and largely pre-symphonic style. Not a bad thing, but how about looking forward for a change?

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Are there any enlightened organ builders out there who could perhaps invent some new "musical" organ stops which could be developed to a chorus? A completely new pipe-organ sound, although preferably not drawing on sitars, bongos and the like.

 

I may be wrong but I havn't heard of a single and significantly different family of stops having been invented for quite a number of years.

 

Anyone wish to correct me?

 

=======================

 

I once did a spec which included a "Celtic Horn" because I couldn't decide what the best pedal reed might be.

 

I'm not sure that it would be suitable as a chorus register, because the re-creation of one based on archeological remains was a bit rough and ready in tonal quality.

 

I have this idea for a chorus of Diaphonic-Dulcianas, where the sound emerges from a 10mm drilling in the otherwise closed-cap. I don't expect it to catch on!

 

MM

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Guest Barry Oakley
Are there any enlightened organ builders out there who could perhaps invent some new "musical" organ stops which could be developed to a chorus? A completely new pipe-organ sound, although preferably not drawing on sitars, bongos and the like.

 

I may be wrong but I havn't heard of a single and significantly different family of stops having been invented for quite a number of years.

 

Anyone wish to correct me?

 

Klais put a stop on the pedal division at Bath Abbey known as a "Fart."

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It would be interesting if they built an authentic pipe organ with some purely digital sounds in it as well. (NOT toaster imitations of athentic pipe organ sounds). I wonder if it's ever been really carried through ever and in a professional and thoughtful manner?

 

Pure traditional organ tone mixed with synth sounds could in theory produce some new and interesting effects.

 

================

 

 

Yes, I've argued this before.

 

I would love to have a digital Glass Harmonica.....imagine that with the celestes.

 

MM

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Klais put a stop on the pedal division at Bath Abbey known as a "Fart."

There is no stop of that name on the Bath Abbey organ, although I've long contended that Gloucester is nothing but farts and whistles!

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Guest Leathered-Lips
There is no stop of that name on the Bath Abbey organ, although I've long contended that Gloucester is nothing but farts and whistles!

 

I think there may have been some confusion about the name of the stop, and the titulare at bath?

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One new stop recently introduces can be found here http://www.orgelsite.nl/kerken42/apeldoorn.htm

It is the "Schrijfhout 1st.", to be translated in English as something as 'wooden writing thing 1 rank'.

 

But don't we know it's sound already (falling between the pedal keys, aching your knee when trying to catch it (in vain), bumping your head when get up again after fetching it ;-) ) ...

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Klais put a stop on the pedal division at Bath Abbey known as a "Fart."

 

 

 

 

This seems very unlikely as it is unusual to employ words of Anglo-Saxon origin as a name for any organ stop : we tend to borrow from the French, Germans or Dutch or use words based on Greek or Roman roots, even if the result is cod Greek or Latin. It would therefore seem likely that we have here a mistranscription of "quart" caused by the peculiar antique script used to engrave the stop knob. Anyone who truly wished to produce a stop imitative of the sound mentioned would more aptly term it Vox Flatulatum

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  • 2 weeks later...
Guest Leathered-Lips
Klais put a stop on the pedal division at Bath Abbey known as a "Fart."

This seems very unlikely as it is unusual to employ words of Anglo-Saxon origin as a name for any organ stop : we tend to borrow from the French, Germans or Dutch or use words based on Greek or Roman roots, even if the result is cod Greek or Latin. It would therefore seem likely that we have here a mistranscription of "quart" caused by the peculiar antique script used to engrave the stop knob. Anyone who truly wished to produce a stop imitative of the sound mentioned would more aptly term it Vox Flatulatum

 

So we have a "Vox Flatulatum" - what would its undulating rank equivalent be called?

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So we have a "Vox Flatulatum" - what would its undulating rank equivalent be called?

 

=================

 

Let's see now....

 

Farts.....Undulating ranks....Unda Maris....under water.....Bath...GOT IT!

 

"Vox Flatulatum Unter Maris"

 

 

I'm sure it's an old tradition there, and might have contributed to the invention of the hydraulus in Rome.

 

"Floten in the bathtub anyone?"

 

Would that be a "Saunaflute" or are they restricted to calliopes?

 

MM

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Guest Leathered-Lips
=================

 

Let's see now....

 

Farts.....Undulating ranks....Unda Maris....under water.....Bath...GOT IT!

 

"Vox Flatulatum Unter Maris"

I'm sure it's an old tradition there, and might have contributed to the invention of the hydraulus in Rome.

 

"Floten in the bathtub anyone?"

 

Would that be a "Saunaflute" or are they restricted to calliopes?

 

MM

 

Get your facts right dear, "Unda Maris" is "a wave of the sea".

 

Do you intend to patent your sauna flute? I think a 16' example would be most impressive.

 

Edna

 

X

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Seriously though folks, in my lonelier moments I do seek amusement from compiling specifications of totally inappropriate stop names, like Albatross 16' or Pringle 8' or Enema 1 3/5'. It's quite fun making the name sound like the sound. A bit like that Douglas Adams book The Meaning of Liff. Surely if we put enough of this stuff on the internet, in 400 years' time whoever takes over the mantle from Bill Drake will be earnestly creating instruments with 5 rank Mounted Crocodiles on them?

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Guest paul@trinitymusic.karoo.co.uk

Did anyone out there ever write down the specification of Sherborne Abbey as rebuilt by that great artist John Coulson? * We are talking about the rebuild before the rebuild before last, I think. Anyone with this precious information please post it for others to enjoy.

 

There were enough 'new' stopnames there to satisfy anyone. I've played a few John Coulson jobs and he wasn't afraid to go out on a voicing limb! The stop that remains in my mind from a cursory trial at Sherborne [1980's?] is a III Steiglitz - I hope I've got that right.

 

 

There must be a lot of money in Sherborne. I gather that the latest rebuild, by Ken Tickell, is a success. I believe that John Budgen tried his best in difficult circumstances to satisfy the previous adviser. I wonder if organists generally appreciate that organbuilders'hands are often tied. So often one thinks why didn't they do such and such? The answer may well be:they considered it but were firmly told 'no'.

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Guest Leathered-Lips
Seriously though folks, in my lonelier moments I do seek amusement from compiling specifications of totally inappropriate stop names, like Albatross 16' or Pringle 8' or Enema 1 3/5'.  It's quite fun making the name sound like the sound.  A bit like that Douglas Adams book The Meaning of Liff.  Surely if we put enough of this stuff on the internet, in 400 years' time whoever takes over the mantle from Bill Drake will be earnestly creating instruments with 5 rank Mounted Crocodiles on them?

 

How about a "Promenade de la nuit 8", but I suppose that'd be too French for your tastes?

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How about a "Promenade de la nuit 8", but I suppose that'd be too French for your tastes?

 

 

Two further suggestions:

 

Choeur des chats for a particularly assertive high pitched mixture containing at least two clashing harmonics.

 

Voix de Blair for a deceptively mild toned diapason with two mouths on opposite sides of the pipe.

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Guest Leathered-Lips
Has anyone ever played a Pan Flute organ stop? It would surely not be an impossible task to construct, as the mechanics of a pan flute are quite simple...

 

No, although steel pans might be more novel but considered leaning a bit towards Hope-Jones.

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Did anyone out there ever write down the specification of Sherborne Abbey as rebuilt by that great artist John Coulson? * We are talking about the rebuild before the rebuild before last, I think.  Anyone with this precious information please post it for others to enjoy.

 

There were enough 'new' stopnames there to satisfy anyone. I've played a few John Coulson jobs and he wasn't afraid to go out on a voicing limb!  The stop that remains in my mind from a cursory trial at Sherborne [1980's?] is a III Steiglitz - I hope I've got that right.

There must be a lot of money in Sherborne.  I gather that the latest rebuild, by Ken Tickell, is a success. I believe that John Budgen tried his best in difficult circumstances to satisfy the previous adviser.  I wonder if organists generally appreciate that organbuilders'hands are often tied.  So often one thinks why didn't they do such and such?  The answer may well be:they considered it but were firmly told 'no'.

 

Mr Budgen is a quite exceptional craftsman with an immense knowledge of organ history which informs everything he does. I had heard that the latest rebuild left the organ still very heavy and still very quiet. It seems a shame, all that money spent on an advisor's whims over the last 20 years to be not much further forward than they were...

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The only pipe organ / sythesizer that I have come across is a recording of maestro Rick Wakeman playing the organ of St.Giles cripplegate and using Bob Moogs famous mini moog on the track Jane Seymore from the 197??? album The Six Wifes of Henry VIII. I know not played at the same time tho. Maybe the seventh manual at the console at the Atlantic Convention Centre is used for a Fairlight CMI synth?? :P

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The only pipe organ / sythesizer that I have come across is a recording of maestro Rick Wakeman playing the organ of St.Giles cripplegate and using Bob Moogs famous mini moog on the track Jane Seymore from the 197??? album The Six Wifes of Henry VIII. I know not played at the same time tho. Maybe the seventh manual at the console at the Atlantic Convention Centre is used for a Fairlight CMI synth?? :P

 

Hi

 

Rick Wakeman used pipe organs on other recordings - "The Gospels" and "The New Gospels" are ones that I've got - and don't forget that Mander's built a "portable" pipe organ for him - I'm trying to find some details (Do Mander's have anything in their archives?)

 

I've used electronic keyboards with a small pipe organ at times - mainly to get solo reed sounds that the organ lacks.

 

Incidentally, for the record, "6 Wives" was produced in 1973. Nigel Ogden broadcast part of Jane Seymore on "The Organist Entertains" last Tuesday. The recording is available on CD (American import).

 

Every Blessing

 

Tony

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