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English Reed Stops


Pierre Lauwers
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In another overloaded -to say the least- thread, we came to discuss about

what distinguishes the english chorus reed stops from the others.

 

This is so interesting a matter it may deserve a discussion here.

The continental organists barely know the british reeds, while the

english may not realize the gulf that obtains between english

and continental reeds.

 

Here is a file from Laukhuff where you'll find different shallot types illustrated:

french, german and english (the english on page 26):

 

http://www.laukhuff.de/kapitel/12.pdf

 

The second difference lie with the pressures, that are considerably higher

for the british reeds: 200-300mm or higher (500mm for the Tuba), while

the germans rarely exceed 100mm, the french 120mm.

 

These differences explain the very different harmonic development in british reeds

compared to continental ones.

 

Scales and materials, on the other hands, are about the same.

 

Best wishes,

Pierre Lauwers

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In another overloaded -to say the least- thread, we came to discuss about

what distinguishes the english chorus reed stops from the others.

 

This is so interesting a matter it may deserve a discussion here.

The continental organists barely know the british reeds, while the

english may not realize the gulf that obtains between english

and continental reeds.

 

Here is a file from Laukhuff where you'll find different shallot types illustrated:

french, german and english (the english on page 26):

 

http://www.laukhuff.de/kapitel/12.pdf

 

The second difference lie with the pressures, that are considerably higher

for the british reeds: 200-300mm or higher (500mm for the Tuba), while

the germans rarely exceed 100mm, the french 120mm.

 

These differences explain the very different harmonic development in british reeds

compared to continental ones.

 

Scales and materials, on the other hands, are about the same.

 

================

 

I don't want to piddle on anyone's fireworks, but why does everyone ignore those simply gorgeous reeds found in the Netherlands?

 

Perhaps it's just me, but I think the best chorus reeds I've heard are on the organ at St.Bavo......they sound so....erm....old English.

 

Another fascinating fact.....they seem to be putting big Tubas on new Polish organs; so you know where to go on holiday next year if you like that sort of thing.

 

Which continent had we in mind Pierre?

 

MM :rolleyes:

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You may prefer this or that type, of course.

Dutch reeds aren't my cup of tea...Nor are

the Regals.

But all are interesting!

 

As for the polish Tubas, they could be very different from

the english ones.

I know of an organ in Arlon, Belgium, which has one...On

the stop tablet! what obtains on the soundboard is something

you'd call, say, Trompetta real magna mirabilis. On low wind

pressure of course.

 

Best wishes,

Pierre

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You may prefer this or that type, of course.

Dutch reeds aren't my cup of tea...Nor are

the Regals.

But all are interesting!

 

As for the polish Tubas, they could be very different from

the english ones.

I know of an organ in Arlon, Belgium, which has one...On

the stop tablet! what obtains on the soundboard is something

you'd call, say, Trompetta real magna mirabilis. On low wind

pressure of course.

 

=================

 

Dutch reeds vary a great deal, from the German style to the English sound at Haarlem and even the Cavaille-Coll inspired reeds of van Huevel and Adema.

 

Haarlem has a gorgeous Oboe, so everyone should feel at home there. The Great "Hoofdwerk" trumpets are good trumpets.....full bodied and blending, and so very English in effect. I always think the pedal reeds.....great rumbling Trombones....sound a bit like the best Hill reeds.

 

The Polish Tubas are...erm...Tubas. Quite big and full in tone. I haven't a clue what pressures they use, but they could certainly be used for C S Lang and Norman Cocker.

 

I tried playing the Cocker "en chamade" at Rotterdam Cathedral.....hysterical!! (I even ran out of notes because I failed to check the compass....ooops!)

 

MM

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