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New Organ Speyer Dom (2010)


Pierre Lauwers
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Interesting. Doubled Unisons and Octaves are nothing new on the continent - the choir organ at Alkmaar has a 4' principal trebled in the treble. (?!) And it dates in part from 1511... So it's been done on the continent for centuries.

 

It is very interesting to see it making a comeback on what otherwise looks like a very standard mainstream modernist movement Germanic organ. I find this far more interesting than the reams of text on the web page about the organ case.

 

Whoever's comissioned it clearly wants a very loud organ.

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"So it's been done on the continent for centuries."

(Quote)

 

Yes, since the Renaissance. But the scales were not differentiated !

Here, it will be the case, like......Like ?

 

I would have liked a more daring mutations and Mixtures design, but this

is very dependant upon the acoustics of the room, which I do not know

so I won't criticize.

Pierre

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I have an old LP, bought from Speyer in the summer of 1988, when I spent 3 weeks there at a friends. All I can remember was that it had 5 manuals, and black and white inverted keys, correct me if I am wrong tho, it was played by some profesor i think. The only other memory I have was that I had a cd of Passau, but without the marvellous LP cover, so my friend rang up Mottete, and they sent me the cover, minus the black shiny things, and I bought a LP of Meinz Dom, with its 6 manual "key desk"

Peter

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Ladies and Gentlemen,

 

Here is a link that might be interesting:

 

http://www.orgelbau-seifert.de/de/akt_0808.html

 

Note, among others, the reeds, and what happens with the Principals at the unisson level. B)

 

With very best wishes,

 

Pierre

 

 

Also interesting is the plethora of couplers, not just the normal, inter-manual variety at unison pitch, but also the so-called "Effektkoppeln" at sub- and super- pitches, as well as the various "Melodiekoppeln" for solo-ing out the top line using stops from a coupled manual.

 

Some aspects of the design seem to be going back 2 or 3 generations, for example the high-pressure Seraphon stops. Only last week I heard a huge organ 1920s organ in Switzerland with a Hauptwerk blessed with no less than 3 such stops - Seraphonrpinzipal, Seraphongamba and Seraphongedeckt, the last of which emitted an amazing 'hoot' like the calliope in a Mississippi steamboat and even louder than the HP Tuba on the same manual. The 3-manual console resembled the cockpit of a Heinkel bomber - and the overall aural impression - to my ears at least - wasn't much different.

 

Other contributors have commented on the new-found 'Tubamania' amongst German organists, and there's no great harm in that, I'm sure. However, as far as some of their other tonal re-discoveries are concerned, I can't help feeling they are re-tracing their grandfathers' steps up the same blind alley.

 

JS

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The plans for Speyer cathedral were discussed at length, and sometimes heatedly, on the German Orgelforum. In short, the case design, offered by a well-known German architect, did not earn the most splendid of grades by most contributors.

 

The stoplist was discussed mostly as the multiplication of principal ranks is concerned. If you look at what Barry got earlier this summer at Magdeburg, you will see that Speyer is not far from the approach chosen there, if the stoplist hints at a more French accent. But if I'm not mistaken there is goint to be another Tuba from London at Speyer.

 

Yes, there definitely is such a thing as a German Tubamania. I, for one, don't get the point, but some others cheer their heads off.

 

However, as far as some of their other tonal re-discoveries are concerned, I can't help feeling they are re-tracing their grandfathers' steps up the same blind alley.

I like that.

 

Best,

Friedrich

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The plans for Speyer cathedral were discussed at length, and sometimes heatedly, on the German Orgelforum. In short, the case design, offered by a well-known German architect, did not earn the most splendid of grades by most contributors.

 

The stoplist was discussed mostly as the multiplication of principal ranks is concerned. If you look at what Barry got earlier this summer at Magdeburg, you will see that Speyer is not far from the approach chosen there, if the stoplist hints at a more French accent. But if I'm not mistaken there is goint to be another Tuba from London at Speyer.

 

Yes, there definitely is such a thing as a German Tubamania. I, for one, don't get the point, but some others cheer their heads off.

 

 

I like that.

 

Best,

Friedrich

 

Perhaps it is not entirely coincidental that Andreas Saager of Seifert und Christoph Keggenhoff of Speyer cathedral have visited here twice. But I don't really think that Seifert will adopt the basically very central German sound of Schukes new organ here; their own tradition is a very different one.

 

As to the tuba: I wanted one, because I know no other German organs AT ALL (including those from Bonn that have stop names saying "Tuba") on which it is really possible to play those big English pieces which need one. And I happen to like a lot of that music! And it is the perfect voice to comand the congregational singing in a big, full building. I can't imagine that the one in Speyer is to be anything like that, however: first of all, it is on the Great, where it would certainly not belong if a solo stop, and secondly, it is at 16' pitch. C-C and Sauer made stops called "tuba" too. I assume that the solo reeds at Speyer will be horizontal.

 

I like my "Serafonflöte", but it doesn't sound as hooty as some. I can't abide HP strings, though.

 

JPM revealed that there will indeed be another tuba from London going to Germany: to Friedrich's home town, in the new Metzler organ in the Münster. As a well-known British organist said to me a couple of weeks ago: "A tube in a Metzler? A bit of an oxymoron, isn't it??"

 

Cheers

B

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The "Tuba Magna" from Cavaillé-Coll is not a Tuba at all.

The name simply means the first octave is half-lenght, in

order to accomodate a Swellbox or another somewhat

crowded space.

The only things that *resembled* the real things were imported

from England; Stahlhuth, round 1900, imported some Willis ones,

either complete or components. Maybe the Willis archives could

tell us more.

 

Pierre

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