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Hum!

 

Why cite it then?

"Support has crumbled..." would have been enough then...

 

Best wishes,

Pierre

 

================

 

OK...I'll re-phrase it.

 

Bradford is a blighted area due to the collapse of the former textile and engineering industries. Many of the traditional British-born workers in those industries moved away, leaving behind a large second and third generation population derived from the immigrant workers who came from areas of the former British commonwealth; many of whom do not attend catholic mass on a Sunday.

 

Bradford is now the heroin-trade capital of Northern England and is famous for the variety of fast-food emporia serving exotic cuisine.

 

There you are! I didn't mention the "A" word once!!

 

;)

MM

 

Hi

 

Thanks for the clarification. Historically, Bradford has always welcomed immigrants (not just Asians) - Westgate Baptist Church moved out to the then upper-class suburb of Manningham in the early 1900's because they found the previous church surrounded by Irish immigrants! There's also quite an Eastern European contingent going back at least a generation.

 

Yes, like much of the industrial North, the city has suffered through the decline of the textile industry, but Bradford tends to get a "bad press" - overall it's a pretty good place to live and things are in general improving all the time. There are problems - but there are problems everywhere!

 

Every Blessing

 

Tony

(Minister Heaton (Bradford) Baptist Church)

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There are problems - but there are problems everywhere!

 

Quite true, and Australia and New Zealand have similiar issues with once flourishing parish churches of inner city suburbs giving way to their former congregations.

 

Today for example my Choir from affluent Remuera joined with that of the Central Methodist Church in Auckland known as Pitt Street Methodist. Methodism in NZ embraces a polynesian flavour and caters for the diversity of Tongan, Fijian, Samoan, Rarotongan and Niue Islanders.

 

Within this we did an introit by Purcell and his verse anthem "Declare his honour' with organ music by JSB and Whitlock, various hymns from traditional methodist to 'Pacifica' hymns. All blended beautifully with good liturgy and a power point presentation on christian work in the Islands.

 

The organ by the way is a 3 manual George Croft (NZ builder) dating from 1911 with additions in 1936, 1947 and 1965. It has a division of 'floating mutations' at 2 2/3, 2, 1 3/5. Several neo-reform NZ instruments have these.

 

My point is that there can be hope for an organ and choral input in a redefined ministry. And it can save our valuable pipe organs too. ;)

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"Within this we did an introit by Purcell and his verse anthem "Declare his honour' with organ music by JSB and Whitlock, various hymns from traditional methodist to 'Pacifica' hymns. All blended beautifully with good liturgy and a power point presentation on christian work in the Islands."

 

(Quote)

 

Now THAT is an interesting idea!

 

Best wishes,

Pierre

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There are problems - but there are problems everywhere!

 

Quite true, and Australia and New Zealand have similiar issues with once flourishing parish churches of inner city suburbs giving way to their former congregations.

 

Today for example my Choir from affluent Remuera joined with that of the Central Methodist Church in Auckland known as Pitt Street Methodist. Methodism in NZ embraces a polynesian flavour and caters for the diversity of Tongan, Fijian, Samoan, Rarotongan and Niue Islanders.

 

Within this we did an introit by Purcell and his verse anthem "Declare his honour' with organ music by JSB and Whitlock, various hymns from traditional methodist to 'Pacifica' hymns. All blended beautifully with good liturgy and a power point presentation on christian work in the Islands.

 

The organ by the way is a 3 manual George Croft (NZ builder) dating from 1911 with additions in 1936, 1947 and 1965. It has a division of 'floating mutations' at 2 2/3, 2, 1 3/5. Several neo-reform NZ instruments have these.

 

My point is that there can be hope for an organ and choral input in a redefined ministry. And it can save our valuable pipe organs too. ;)

 

Hi

 

Good to see that "Blended Worship" is spreading - I'm convinced that it's the way ahead in many areas.

 

As regards pipe organs, all too often they are seen as irrelevant, and discarded even if the church is not htreatened with closure - there's one in another local Baptist Church that hasn't been played since the previous organist died last year, which is a real shame, as it's quite a nice 3 manual - originally an early Binns 2m rebuilt & extended by a local firm, but very much in the Binns style. It's a resource going to waste - the organ can be used with music groups (contrary to what many seem to think!) as well as in more traditikonal roles.

 

Every Blessing

 

Tony

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