Jump to content
Mander Organs
gazman

The Organist's Last Night Of The Proms

Recommended Posts

Hi,

 

We discussed on another thread the unashamedly popular theme of the recital I gave last month as part of the monthly series of organ concerts I give at one of my churches. The popular theme was successful, and brought in a number of people who wouldn't normally consider coming to an organ concert.

 

Well, I'm going to try the same thing next month. In a frivolous moment I put in this month's programme something to the effect that "Next month's concert will be 'The Organist's Last Night of the Proms'. Bring along your Union flags to wave and something to make a noise."

 

All well and good, but now I'm going to have to think of some suitable repertoire for next month's concert. I've got some ideas, but am sure there are going to be many more bright ideas from contributors to this forum.

 

So, friends, what would you perform if you were in my shoes? :P

 

Suggestions, please..... :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A rather sumptuous piece with a nice, memorable tune, and not too long, is the Adorazione by Oreste Ravanello which has been recorded by Jane Parker Smith. Deserves to be better known. I got my copy from an on-line place in Florence via abebooks.co.uk and have enjoyed learning it although some of it is quite pianistic.

 

Malcolm Kemp

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This book contains Noel Rawsthorne's Hornpipe Humoresque and an amusing piece based on the Drunken Sailor by Rosalie Bonighton. Both these are redolent of the Last Night of the Proms. Anyway Gareth, whatever your programme is do post it here please!

 

 

http://www.kevinmayhew.com/Shop/Products/2...Collection.aspx

 

 

Peter

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
This book contains Noel Rawsthorne's Hornpipe Humoresque and an amusing piece based on the Drunken Sailor by Rosalie Bonighton. Both these are redolent of the Last Night of the Proms. Anyway Gareth, whatever your programme is do post it here please!

http://www.kevinmayhew.com/Shop/Products/2...Collection.aspx

Peter

 

The Rawsthorne is by far the pick of the bunch, and if memory serves me right, the rest were commissioned/published on the back of the success of the hornpipe (originally in a single copy, later in a very good book of transcritions by Rawsthorne, sadly no longer available). I've played the Organists Country Gardens in a recital (with one or two slight modifications at harmonically weak points, don't have the copy to hand at the moment), it mixes the Grainger with wedding music. It isn't as effective as the Rawsthorne, neither are any of the pieces in volume 2 of the same series.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
A rather sumptuous piece with a nice, memorable tune, and not too long, is the Adorazione by Oreste Ravanello....

 

Thank you. I've never come across it, nor the composer, and will look it up!

 

How about the Ives "Variations on America"?

 

Thanks. That was one of my ideas too! I've looked for my copy, but can't find it. I think now that I lent it to a certain former pupil of mine which, unfortunately, means that it's the other side of the planet now.....

 

This book contains Noel Rawsthorne's Hornpipe Humoresque and an amusing piece based on the Drunken Sailor by Rosalie Bonighton.

 

Thanks. I've borrowed that book from a friend of mine, and played through all the pieces to see what might be suitable. Hornpipe Humoresque is pretty much a cert!

 

The Rawsthorne is by far the pick of the bunch, and if memory serves me right, the rest were commissioned/published on the back of the success of the hornpipe (originally in a single copy, later in a very good book of transcritions by Rawsthorne, sadly no longer available). I've played the Organists Country Gardens in a recital (with one or two slight modifications at harmonically weak points, don't have the copy to hand at the moment), it mixes the Grainger with wedding music.

 

Unfortunately, I wasn't terribly taken with "Up she rises" by Bonighton, but it does fit the theme. I thought that "Dance with the saints" was probably the best of the rest after the Rawsthorne. The Pasticcio by Nixon was ok, and suitable if not terribly inspiring, I thought. Much of the music seemed rather contrived, and definitely sub-Rawsthorne's "Hornpipe Humoresque", but maybe I'm missing something.

 

Thanks for all the suggestions so far.

 

Any more for any more? :blink:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Thank you. I've never come across it, nor the composer, and will look it up!

Thanks. That was one of my ideas too! I've looked for my copy, but can't find it. I think now that I lent it to a certain former pupil of mine which, unfortunately, means that it's the other side of the planet now.....

Thanks. I've borrowed that book from a friend of mine, and played through all the pieces to see what might be suitable. Hornpipe Humoresque is pretty much a cert!

Unfortunately, I wasn't terribly taken with "Up she rises" by Bonighton, but it does fit the theme. I thought that "Dance with the saints" was probably the best of the rest after the Rawsthorne. The Pasticcio by Nixon was ok, and suitable if not terribly inspiring, I thought. Much of the music seemed rather contrived, and definitely sub-Rawsthorne's "Hornpipe Humoresque", but maybe I'm missing something.

 

Thanks for all the suggestions so far.

 

Any more for any more? :blink:

 

Have you ever come across the name "A.L. Peace"? He was organist of St George's Hall, Liverpool at the turn of the century. I only know his first Sonata (D mnor) but the finale (in the tonic major) is really quite a good romp if taken at a good speed. It's highly Victorian, of course, but obscenely so! If it sounds a possibility, let me know and I'll send you a copy.

Martin.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Have you ever come across the name "A.L. Peace"? He was organist of St George's Hall, Liverpool at the turn of the century. I only know his first Sonata (D mnor) but the finale (in the tonic major) is really quite a good romp if taken at a good speed. It's highly Victorian, of course, but obscenely so! If it sounds a possibility, let me know and I'll send you a copy.

Martin.

 

 

Thank you Martin. It sounds interesting! I'll send you a PM.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm sure that there are many more bright ideas out there on this forum of talented organists and music lovers, esteemed colleagues!

 

We're not a po-faced bunch with few ideas of how to unashamedly delight our audiences, surely! :P

 

Seriously, I'm still looking for good ideas for the concert (I now have an excellent soprano willing to contribute, BTW) and all suggestions will be welcome. Thanks! :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've just been listening to an improvisation by Jan Mulder (played at St Ouen) based on "Twinkle Twinkle Little Star" - quite superb. How about something like that?

 

P

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
The Pasticcio by Nixon was ok, and suitable if not terribly inspiring, I thought. Any more for any more? :)

 

Curiously Gareth I am progamming this for next month's recital at my church. I quite like the way she weaves suggestions of other tunes into the Auld Lang Syne theme. (BTW I can't identify the "subsidury" subject which enters about halfway through the second movement - any ideas, anyone?) But I do like the Fur Elise reference. What I am tempted to do is to play this and get the audience to identify the themes and the composers imitated (eg Mendelsohnn) somewhat in the style of the "Hidden Melody" in Jospeh Cooper's TV show of years ago "Face the Music". I'm sure many forum members remember that show. One last thing, what is the hymn tune to "The Day of Resurrection" (Ellacombe) doing at the end of this piece?

 

Peter

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Not being able to read dutch... is this piece available as a score?

 

Not sure - I believe that, despite being described as an improvisation, it is actually:

 

Sinfonia on “Geprezen zij de Heer” by Jan Mulder

 

(or, at least, heavily based on that piece)

 

As far as I can tell it does not appear to be in print.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The young player on the you-tube clip seems to have the potential to develop into a really good player and is probably someone to watch out for in the future although we currently only know him as Hautbois8. I liked the reference to Rule Brittannia (shades of the Rawsthorne Hornpipe

Humoresque) but was less impressed with some of the other clips of him playing.

 

Thanks Michael for tracing the piece in a catalogue; I'll be on to Allegro immediately the Bank Holiday is over and the weather improves.

 

Malcolm Kemp

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What about the "Suite in Blue" by Michel (in Jazz Inspirations 2) - the Sortie at the end always goes down well (I've only played a couple of movements).

 

There's a good jazz arrangement of "When the Saints" by Kenneth Baker in something like "Jazz pieces, Home Organ Library volume 7". (Actually it's here: http://www.sheetmusicwarehouse.co.uk/details.php?ref=53080)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for all your suggestions, folks! B)

 

Having just returned from a week's holiday, I find I need to sort out the programme soon! But I've persuaded a good soprano to do some appropriate material, so will be doing some accompanying as part of the recital which will take away some of the need to provide suitable pieces on the organ....

 

But you've given me (and others) some excellent ideas for future concerts too. Thank you!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
What about something like Walton's Crown Imperial March? A bit 'Land of Hope and Glory'ish.

 

I hadn't thought of that! Thanks! B)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I hadn't thought of that! Thanks! B)

 

Orb and Sceptre is a better crowd pleaser. The Gower arrangement in the Walton book is easier than the original McKie arrangement from OUP.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As it is, we're going to be using Land of Hope and Glory. However, I'm not playing the rest of the Pomp and Circumstance march. This is what I'm intending to do instead: I shall ask the audience beforehand to suggest some "patriotic" pieces. We'll sing a verse of Land of H&G, and then I'll improvise on some of those themes they suggest, before returning to LOHG, up a tone or so, and then improvise on some more themes, before returning again to LOHG again up a further tone or so, and so on, depending on how many themes are suggested.

 

Ok, I know, utterly tasteless! But I bet the audience will love it......!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

An interim update for anyone who might be thinking of buying copies of the music by Mulder played by the young man on the You-Tube clips as above.

 

Allegro Music, unusually, drew a blank. I then rang a friend in the church music publishing/retailing business and and the call was answered by his wife who is an excellent linguist, having lived on the continent. I got her to look up www.klavarskribo.nl and, lo and behold, she was that very afternoon visiting a friend who is Dutch. Apparently, klavarskribo is a system of musical notation different to ours and familiar to Dutch children. (Perhaps some of our members living on the continent know more about this?) On the basis that eveyone in Holland speaks excellent English my friend is going to ring them on Monday to try to establish whether these pieces are available in conventional notation.

 

From what I can gather so far the stave is read vertically rather than horizontally. This reminds me that about 45 years ago a much older person used to practice in the same church as me and he used to play Durufle and similar composers using vertical rather than horizontal music. I have never some across this before or since.

 

Malcolm Kemp

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ok, I know, utterly tasteless! But I bet the audience will love it......!

Another one which would fall into this category is Sidney Campbell's Pageantry. A very brash piece, it has the flavour of pomp and circumstance with a modern edge and a whiff of cheese. You could probably transcribe it effectively for a military band. Anyone play it?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Please sign in to comment

You will be able to leave a comment after signing in



Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...