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Pubs And Churches


Peter Clark
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Yes, sausages at the bar, with mustard. They're very, very good...

 

I'm also trying to work out what the other pub is: would it be the Vine, The Eclipse, The Queen's head, The Black Boy?... Spoilt for choice!

 

Congrats on the appointment Richard!

 

 

The Appointments thread wandered off a bit into a discussion on pubs, and, being the high-minded chap that you've all come to know me as, I thought it might be a good scheme to recommend pubs near places we have played (or indeed play on a regular basis).

 

St Ethelreda's, Ely Place, London, which is getting a new organ next year, is but a crozier's throw from an excellent pub The Mitre and about 3 minutes walk from the Melton Mowbury which has to be the most expensive pub in Londoin (£7.95 for two pints last time I was there) but which specialises in pork pies (which I cannot abide but I'm sure some members of this forum adore).

 

 

Westminster Cathedral - The Cardinal, of course which does organic beers and lagers. Not too pricey either.

 

There's a fairly decent Wetherspoon's in City Road, just round the corner from where I play, St Peter's Catholic Church, Cardiff, which often has guest ales in, and the food is quite good too. Sunday roast including a drink is anout £6.00.

 

If you get to play St Michael's Croydon, The Windmill on St James's Road is worth a visit, as is The Porter and Sorter near East Croydon Station.

 

 

Any more suggestions?

 

Peter

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The Wykeham Arms, just a chorister's throw from the precints of the Cathedral at Winchester is quite homely.

 

They do a great line in Sausages!

 

In Romsey there is the Abbey Hotel just outside the Abbey. I accompany a choir that rehearse in there. Not far to go for a beer at half time!

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See my post (no 12) in the thread New Organs - excitement....

See here.

 

Whilst probably deserving a thread of its own I'll mention here that this seems to be a gift from the recently retired Priest Kit Cunningham who has been most supportive of the music at St Etheldreda's. I'm glad the powers that be have refrained from including a novelty stop referencing St Etheldreda's best-known tradition, theblessing of throats..

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See here.

 

Whilst probably deserving a thread of its own I'll mention here that this seems to be a gift from the recently retired Priest Kit Cunningham who has been most supportive of the music at St Etheldreda's. I'm glad the powers that be have refrained from including a novelty stop referencing St Etheldreda's best-known tradition, theblessing of throats..

 

 

The organ is not a gift from Fr Kit: one doesn't spend a lifetime in a religious order and accumulate enought money to buy a brand new organ!

 

St Ethelreda's is run by the Institute of Charity (Rosminians) as is the parish at which I play; the PP here at St Peter's is also Father Provincial of the UK Province. All we can say is "what strange rumours get around!". But the musical tradition which Fr Kit supported will continue under Fr Tom Diedun as a glance at the church's music list demonstrates.

 

Regards

 

Peter

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St Paul's Square in Birmingham boasts The Rectory, which has caused bemused expressions when visitors are invited to join us over in the rectory for a few pints afterwards

 

I guess that's after my time! There was a pub immediately at the end of the bit of road that leads to the church car parking, but I can't recall what that was called. Perhaps that's too much sampling of the same.... B)

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I guess that's after my time! There was a pub immediately at the end of the bit of road that leads to the church car parking, but I can't recall what that was called. Perhaps that's too much sampling of the same.... B)

 

The Ropewalk. We go there a lot too!! :unsure::huh:

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Brampton in Cumbria has, a few steps along from the church, the Shoulder of Mutton - which has Geltsdale's Cold Fell as its normal bitter - absolutely splendid ale - and mercifully no food and no brats.

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Almost in the churchyard of Kendal Parish Church, Cumbria is the "Ring O' Bells" pub which was at one time church property. When I used go there in the early 80's on tuning visits I always went in for a pint (afterwards). The Landlord at that time was a really interesting old boy who had worked for the local organbuilding firm of Wilkinsons and I used to enjoy listening to his stories. The ale wasn't bad either. There wasn't a conventional bar, just a small hatch in the wall where you ordered and they brought it to the table. Very old-fashioned. Doubt if it's like that now.

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Gave a concert at Kendal PC recently - and noticed the RoB, but didn't venture in - seemed somewhat rowdy (noise of 'pop' and there seemed to be some clientele of lesser age than, say, 40, so it all seemed worth going to a rather more silent drinking establishment.)

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Almost in the churchyard of Kendal Parish Church, Cumbria is the "Ring O' Bells" pub which was at one time church property.

 

 

St Thomas' church Salisbury is the ancient parish church of the city - built before the cathedral and used as a chapel of ease for the masons whilst cementing the pile up the road(!). The story is that there is a tunnel between the chancel of the church and a 13th century ale house opposite called The Haunch of Venison which the singers used to get their drinks in after the services. I have no idea whether this is true or not, or whether anyone has ever found the tunnel. Both the Church and the pub still exist, so maybe someone could do some excavating??

Richard

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Gave a concert at Kendal PC recently - and noticed the RoB, but didn't venture in - seemed somewhat rowdy (noise of 'pop' and there seemed to be some clientele of lesser age than, say, 40, so it all seemed worth going to a rather more silent drinking establishment.)

 

It really must have changed then. The time I was working on the organ (hopefully, that hasn't altered too much!) we used to say how nice it was to find a pub with no music and not centred around food. (but that was in 1980 ish.) Another thing I remember from that time (off topic, sorry) was a wonderful old boy (verger?) in the church who used to state the obvious. For example he pointed out to some visitors a fantastic armorial panel with the date of 1680 painted on it and said "That's over 100 year old yer know". I heard this at least twenty times whilst working on the organ and had a job not to laugh. Also, whilst we were really struggling down a ladder out of the organ with a large scale 16ft open metal pipe he shouted out "Are yer doing a bit of carpentry?" I wont repeat our muttered replies! A new topic here could be "some funny remarks heard in churches - organ-related of course.

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  • 1 month later...
It really must have changed then. The time I was working on the organ (hopefully, that hasn't altered too much!) we used to say how nice it was to find a pub with no music and not centred around food. (but that was in 1980 ish.) Another thing I remember from that time (off topic, sorry) was a wonderful old boy (verger?) in the church who used to state the obvious. For example he pointed out to some visitors a fantastic armorial panel with the date of 1680 painted on it and said "That's over 100 year old yer know". I heard this at least twenty times whilst working on the organ and had a job not to laugh. Also, whilst we were really struggling down a ladder out of the organ with a large scale 16ft open metal pipe he shouted out "Are yer doing a bit of carpentry?" I wont repeat our muttered replies! A new topic here could be "some funny remarks heard in churches - organ-related of course.

 

It's still there and under new management, although they recently had a failure of the ovens meaning that they had to stop serving food - more's the pity. It's a pleasant little pub!

 

As far as I can tell, no-one from the Church (apart from me) tends to go there nowadays. The Choir Men prefer The Wheatsheaf across the road, where the beers are more varied and the atmosphere is more lively. I wouldn't recommend eating in there other than on a Sunday, however...

 

We have an intriguing tradition of playing a "Middle Voluntary" at Matins and Evensong, which originated over a century ago when a wealthy lady in the congregation bequeathed a sum of money to be added to the Organist's salary in order that he might play a piece between the Psalm and the First Lesson. The idea was that she and her friends could have a quick natter whilst the Vicar, Men and Gentlemen of the Choir repaired to the Ring o'Bells for a swift half before continuing with the service! Mercifully the nattering and trip to the pub have long since died out, but the voluntary remains. An opportunity for the congregation to reflect - and a good way of ensuring that they are used to listening to organ voluntaries as music, rather than as something to talk over...

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  • 2 months later...
We have an intriguing tradition of playing a "Middle Voluntary" at Matins and Evensong, which originated over a century ago when a wealthy lady in the congregation bequeathed a sum of money to be added to the Organist's salary in order that he might play a piece between the Psalm and the First Lesson. The idea was that she and her friends could have a quick natter whilst the Vicar, Men and Gentlemen of the Choir repaired to the Ring o'Bells for a swift half before continuing with the service! Mercifully the nattering and trip to the pub have long since died out, but the voluntary remains. An opportunity for the congregation to reflect - and a good way of ensuring that they are used to listening to organ voluntaries as music, rather than as something to talk over...

 

The "middle voluntary" seems to be a feature of Scandinavian worship: when I was a Denmark and Sweden a few years ago I went to a few services and the organist often played between the readings and the sermon - not just a 30 second improvisation while the priest finds his homily but a piece lasting sometimes 4 - 5 minutes. (I knew nothing of this tradition some twenty years ago when I was organist for the Finnish church in London, however. )

 

 

Peter

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There's a fairly decent Wetherspoon's in City Road, just round the corner from where I play, St Peter's Catholic Church, Cardiff, which often has guest ales in, and the food is quite good too. Sunday roast including a drink is anout £6.00.

 

 

Peter

 

I'm sure that's the church where I went to get a newly installed SSL system working properly in the early 1990s. I feel sure the organist was called Peter, was that you? I remember the organ being on the North and South walls of the tower above the balcony.

 

John R

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I'm sure that's the church where I went to get a newly installed SSL system working properly in the early 1990s. I feel sure the organist was called Peter, was that you? I remember the organ being on the North and South walls of the tower above the balcony.

 

John R

 

Indeedy-doody!

 

Small world!

 

Peter

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I was always taught that, from time immemorial and before then even, churches were built close to the village pub in order to give the bellringers something to do/somewhere to go during the service. (Having said that, our bellringers do nearly all attend the services very regularly.)

 

Story has it that in the early 20th century a church in Hove (now famous for its excellent community social work with the homeless) had a large paid choir which was allowed to leave the church during the sermon. The verger apparently had a signal he used to tell the choirmen in the pub at the bottom of the road when the sermon was finishing. Either this story is apocryphal or church authorities were much more tolerant towards choirs in those days.

 

Malcolm

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