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I see the "new" RCO website is up and running and that their "opening" hours remain the same. I have visions of knocking on a door on a side street somewhere between the hours of 10 and 4 and being led into someone's back bedroom. lol....

 

Don't knock it - some people pay good money (particularly in Clapham) for this type of experience.

 

So are flying helmets and a stick of wet celery now de rigeur as accessories for the FRCO?

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Whilst I accept that Stephen and 'Alsa' have found them useful, nevertheless I have never met a score with unusual C clefs - and have played for quite a number of events, involving orchestras, organs, and various other types of ensemble.
I take it you mean soprano clef? The FRCO score reading test has always used alto and tenor clefs and I think that is fair enough since they are both standard in the orchestral repertoire. Indeed, I would like to see the alto clef being used much more in organ music too. Many's the time I've seen left hand passages replete with leger lines or clef changes which would be far more conveniently notated in the alto clef. I sometimes use the Peters edition of Bach's "18" that uses C clefs and like it very much.
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I take it you mean soprano clef? The FRCO score reading test has always used alto and tenor clefs and I think that is fair enough since they are both standard in the orchestral repertoire. Indeed, I would like to see the alto clef being used much more in organ music too. Many's the time I've seen left hand passages replete with leger lines or clef changes which would be far more conveniently notated in the alto clef. I sometimes use the Peters edition of Bach's "18" that uses C clefs and like it very much.

 

Yes, I do VH.

 

However, it could surely be argued just as effectively that one should be able to read up to at least four or five ledger-lines in either direction?

 

Personally, I dislike changes of clef - even if to accommodate several staves in a restricted spce - or to obviate the need to read ledger-lines.

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However, it could surely be argued just as effectively that one should be able to read up to at least four or five ledger-lines in either direction?
Indeed. I wouldn't argue with that at all. I was just making the point that the alto clef could beneficially be a standard part of the organist's armoury, if only we were all taught it on a par with the treble and bass clefs. It won't happen, though.
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Guest Roffensis
I am inclined to agree with Rev. Newnham - surely the committee must have been informed by their financial advisors as to whether or not there were sufficient funds avaiilable to effect the move?

 

I had also understood that a contract had been (or was about to be) signed with Goll Organs for a new organ in the (new) extension. I assume that this in fact not the case. Is it possible that there has been an element of mis-management?

 

They also seem to be very keen on collecting my subscription but rather less keen on being concerned that I actually get something for my money - which currently I do not! Not particularly through my own fault, either!

 

Personally, I cannot help wondering whether in fact a move to Birmingham from London would be a retrograde step. Whilst there might be some difference in rent or purchase prices, there are surely many more things in London which would attract organists to visit. For one, the RFH organ (if it actually gets re-instated after the refurbishment of the hall). Then there are the rather greater number of organs of all sizes, more concert-halls, more theatres and other places of entertainment. This is to say nothing of four cathedrals (if Westminster Abbey is included) each with a superb choir. There is also the presence of four of the national music conservatoires, the British Library, numerous art galleries and thousands of restaurants, cafes and bars.

 

Whilst Birmingham probably has a number of each of the above, I think that it is fair to say that London by its very size and nature will have a far greater choice of any and all of them.

 

Although a Man of Kent, I moved to Liverpool in 1979, having grown up around London and often going there and to all the local venues. Oh heady days :blink:

Since in Liverpool I often thought what an ideal location it would be for the RCO, partly through it's situation and partly because of the wealth of varied organs here. Not just the three main Cathedral organs, but St.Georges Hall would be an ideal resource, better tthan the current regime of boxing matches et al and infrequent recitals. There are also very many extremely fine and original instruments, St Francis Xavier with it's 4 decker Hill, St Mary's, Edge Hill with a 1820s Bewsher and Fleetwood, St Vincent de Paul with a 2 manual 1844 Gray and Davison, Holy Trinity, Walton Breck original 1863 Willis complete with Barker Lever, I could go on with many more, never mind dirty and congested London, who needs it, stuck deep south and no where near as well placed as Liverpool. As a city it is grossly underated despite a wealth of gems, all of which could be real assets to such as the RCO and student use.

 

Richard

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Although a Man of Kent, I moved to Liverpool in 1979, having grown up around London and often going there and to all the local venues. Oh heady days  :D

Since in Liverpool I often thought what an ideal location it would be for the RCO, partly through it's situation and partly because of the wealth of varied organs here. Not just the three main Cathedral organs, but St.Georges Hall would be an ideal resource, better tthan the current regime of boxing matches et al and infrequent recitals. There are also very many extremely fine and original instruments, St Francis Xavier with it's 4 decker Hill, St Mary's, Edge Hill with a 1820s Bewsher and Fleetwood, St Vincent de Paul with a 2 manual 1844 Gray and Davison, Holy Trinity, Walton Breck original 1863 Willis complete with Barker Lever, I could go on with many more, never mind dirty and congested London, who needs it, stuck deep south and no where near as well placed as Liverpool. As a city it is grossly underated despite a wealth of gems, all of which could be real assets to such as the RCO and student use.

 

Richard

A Man of Kent or a Kentish Man? Doesn't it depend on which side of the River Medway you were born?

 

Now then, excuse me guvnor while I sweep this soot of of my ears and clean my dirty London hands. At least I'm not stuck deep south - I'm a north of the river kinda guy.

 

Right, where were we? Oh yes! :o:huh:;):D:huh: Liverpool - City of Culture. B) No, seriously. Richard is banging the drum for his local patch, but this one-eyed viewpoint just opens the argument up for everyone to claim that their town or city has a number of fine historic organs too. To quote Arsene Wenger, the Arsenal football manager: "Every man thinks his wife is the most beautiful...." The truth of the matter is that if you are looking for the places with the best collection of organs as potential home for the RCO, then you have to consider Oxford, Cambridge, Birmingham, Liverpool, Edinburgh, Manchester and of course, dirty old London.

 

Richard's claim for Liverpool has just as much merit as any of the above, though I am doubtful whether the local authority is one of the more enlightened and supportive ones, plus the factor that Liverpool isn't exactly flush with money.

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Richard's claim for Liverpool has just as much merit as any of the above, though I am doubtful whether the local authority is one of the more enlightened and supportive ones, plus the factor that Liverpool isn't exactly flush with money.

 

His list of organs in Liverpool doesn't exactly present anything that is a bit more cutting edge than the 1930's, which would be a tad restrictive for the activities of the more ambitious musician.

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Guest delvin146
His list of organs in Liverpool doesn't exactly present anything that is a bit more cutting edge than the 1930's, which would be a tad restrictive for the activities of the more ambitious musician.

 

I've always said that a well-resourced English romantic/Imperial organ with enough upper work can very often make a satisfactory job of organ music of many genres and periods, if if it's not perfect and absolutely authentic. Many classical jobs simply cannot, no matter how exquisite the voicing. I know which I'd rather have personally.

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Guest Roffensis

A Man of Kent or a Kentish Man? Doesn't it depend on which side of the River Medway you were born?

 

East actually, only the best!!

R

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Guest Roffensis
His list of organs in Liverpool doesn't exactly present anything that is a bit more cutting edge than the 1930's, which would be a tad restrictive for the activities of the more ambitious musician.

 

Oh don't worry ,there a lots of modern "classical" organs here too, I just don't like them :D:DB);) . I find organ music to be better served by instruments other than electric tin openers :P , and seriously consider that many of these modern heaps will be burnt once the pendulem has completed it's swing back. Imagine the joy when such gems as Christchurch Oxford and New College are replaced by Hills, and Willis's, oh.... but I forgot, Father Willis dead, so is William Hill. Thats the reason why so many have already been destroyed and modern Organists do not know how to cope or play them without an array of 75 Generals. No we need to get back to authentic, and that means REAL organs. Liverpool has lots, including the very finest in this country :P . Forget the biscuit tins :P , the RCO didn't last long in Birmingham did it :P ?!!!.

R

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Guest Lee Blick
Yesterday I received a duplicated letter and a credit-card-style ticket to let me know that The RCO is now officially contactable via a Box No. in South East London!

No explanation was given other than that The RCO were vacating their Birmingham office today.  We are told that the website will be re-launched from Monday.  I do not expect to receive much in the way of interesting information on Monday: last time there were developments (the cancellation of the new concert hall organ) no reference of any kind was made to this fact at the time on the website.

 

There is no hint as to how long this situation is expected to continue.  I have to ask: Is this once august body now reduced to carrying on its activities from someone's back bedroom?

 

What do others think?  Has this gone totally pear-shaped or what?

 

For an organisation holding a royal charter, I think the current situation is unfortunate. Hopefully some sort or strategy or plan can be implemented to prevent it from becoming a bit tin pot.

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Oh don't worry ,there a lots of modern "classical" organs here too, I just don't like them :D  :D  B)  ;) . I find organ music to be better served by instruments other than electric tin openers :P , and seriously consider that many of these modern heaps will be burnt once the pendulem has completed it's swing back. Imagine the joy when such gems as Christchurch Oxford and New College are replaced by Hills, and Willis's, oh.... but I forgot, Father Willis dead, so is William Hill. Thats the reason why  so many have already been destroyed and modern Organists do not know how to cope or play them without an array of 75 Generals. No we need to get back to authentic, and that means REAL organs. Liverpool has lots, including the very finest in this country :P . Forget the biscuit tins :P , the RCO didn't last long in Birmingham did it :P ?!!!.

R

 

One man's meat,eh?

 

Good to know the reactionary wing of the organ world is alive and kicking.

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Guest paul@trinitymusic.karoo.co.uk

THE FOLLOWING APPEARED BY ACCIDENT - I WAS STILL DRAFTING IT THEN.

full posting appears next but one. P.

 

Some thinking about the RCO.

 

1. Admin

In the days when I used to know the RCO well - thirty years ago (to be frank) - the College existed on a lease-held building and three paid staff - two secretaries and a permanent Clerk. There was an honorary auditor and honorary architect and one supposes a couple of cleaners! Everyone else was there on expenses only including the officers who were big names. The tally when you visit the site even (or read your bumph) is amazing now. Even if you reckon that each one might only be severely part-time, being charitable, say one day per week each, the place is positively stuffed with staff now.

Point? In those days the college had well over twice as many members and many times more than twice as many candidates for its examinations.

 

Question: what has been added to the workload?

1. An increased schedule of Education 'off campus' - and good for them! Mind you, they do no more than, say the RSCM and little more than the IAO, both of whom get copnsiderably less in income.

2. Some techonlogical outreach - website etc. Mind you, this is extremely weak, fails to be up-to-date and could be updated in the present quality by one school leaver working two hours a month.

3. A thicker publication.

4. The effort of having to book (and pay for) places that are not their own for courses and examinations

5. Running around by secretarial staff after the huge work-force!

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Some thinking about the RCO.

 

1. Admin

In the days when I used to know the RCO well - thirty years ago (to be frank) - the College existed on a lease-held building and three paid staff - two secretaries and a permanent Clerk. There was an honorary auditor and honorary architect and one supposes a couple of cleaners! Everyone else was there on expenses only including the officers who were big names. The tally when you visit the site even (or read your bumph) is amazing now.  Even if you reckon that each one might only be severely part-time, being charitable, say one day per week each, the place is positively stuffed with staff now.

Point? In those days the college had well over twice as many members and many times more than twice as many candidates for its examinations.

 

Question: what has been added to the workload?

1. An increased schedule of Education 'off campus' - and good for them!  Mind you, they do no more than, say the RSCM and little more than the IAO, both of whom get copnsiderably less in income.

2. Some techonlogical outreach - website etc. Mind you, this is extremely weak, fails to be up-to-date and could be updated in the present quality by one school leaver working two hours a month.

3. A thicker publication.

4. The effort of having to book (and pay for) places that are not their own for courses and examinations

5. Running around by secretarial staff after the huge work-force!

 

Paul, you make some sensible points - I agree heartily with your conclusions. It appears to come down to: mis-management, an over-large staff, poor use of resources and an apparent inability to plan ahead.

 

In the long term I do not know what is to become of this institution - it is possible that it may disappear into a black hole, if it continues at its present level of competence or usefulness.

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Guest paul@trinitymusic.karoo.co.uk

Some thinking about the RCO.

 

Admin

In the days when I used to know the RCO well - thirty years ago (to be frank) - the College existed with a lease-held building and three paid staff - two secretaries and a permanent Clerk. There was an honorary auditor and honorary architect and one supposes a couple of cleaners! Everyone else busy on college activities was there on 'expenses-only' including the officers who were big names. The tally when you visit the present site (or read your bumph) is amazing now. Even if you reckon that each person named might only be severely part-time (being charitable, say one day per week each) the place is positively stuffed with staff now. Interestingly, some of these appear to have regular jobs in widely separated places. Simply re-imbursing their necessary travel expenses must be a major bill.

Point? In those days the college had significantly more members and more than twice as many candidates for its examinations. No wonder it is running short of funds!

 

Question: what has been added to the workload?

1. An increased schedule of Education 'off campus' - and good for them! Mind you, they do no more than, say, the RSCM and little more than the IAO, both of whom get considerably less in income.

2. Some technological outreach - website etc. Mind you, this is extremely weak, fails to be up-to-date and could be updated in the present quality by one school leaver working two hours a month.

3. A thicker publication (everything in bigger print than it used to be to make up for the shorter lists), and in a good year a couple of other occasional publications. None of these appear to be for any particular dead-line which must make their publication easier. One year we received the year book a year late and misnamed - or did I dream that?

4. The effort of having to book (and pay for) places that are not their own for courses and examinations

5. Running around by secretarial staff after the huge work-force!

Have I left anything out?

 

Need for an organ

It has become apparent that The College council feels that the importance of the organization is going to be judged on the excellence of its own organ. Can this really be the case? In the case of presenting core repertoire convincingly, the college ideally should have its own instrument with a good basic choice of stops, but in judging whether candidates can play accurately or musically will this show anything that mastering and using a 'bog-standard' three-decker can't?

Ah, you say...we must have tracker action! Not vital, provided that the action is efficient. The RCO were using St.Michael's Cornhill until fairly recently, nothing tracker there!

We must have pistons! Well - while the RCO used St.Andrew's Holborn the ARCO candidates there didn't have such conveniences.

Why should the college have an expensive new instrument - for the council to give recitals upon? To justify the RCO's existence? To add to the tally of 'fine' imported instruments? (Don't get me started!) If the courses are being held 'out in the field' (which, at least in theory, adds to their accessability - but also to their cost to put on) how necessary is a fabulous organ back at base?

 

Need for a proper home

Even with a small staff, any organisation boasting more than 3000 members world-wide needs a proper base. Not all filing can be electronic, not all meetings can be effectively held via the internet or through shared telephone calls. I believe that if there was a proper home - say a redundant Methodist-style church somewhere - this would save money on a grand scale. Every time examination sessions happen on someone else's territory there are fees to pay and major admin tasks involved. The exact location of a new home might appear to be the main question, but the critical one is:

Now they've moved around a couple of times, expanded their staff, paid all those expenses (or fees, maybe?) how much capital do they have left??

 

Worst scenario, they should still be able to rent somewhere half suitable. Pity they probably can't buy it now, but there have been mistakes along the way. Anyone can see that now.

 

What to do?

The choice of locations has to depend on whether they expect people to travel in. I think a properly run RCO needs to be pretty near the centre of a decent transport system. After leaving London (and ignoring this clause in their Charter!) Birmingham was a sensible choice. There are still some inexpensive places to rent in the Birmingham area - ones with plenty of space. Office work can go on in office buildings, so can lectures, meetings and examinations.

 

It has now been several months since the cancellation of 'The Big Plan' in Birmingham. During the succeeding period you would have imagined that some stategy would have been hammered out and members informed. No. if there is a plan, it hasn't been vouchsafed to those of us who actually pay their bills. Speaking personally, I want the RCO to survive, know some of the high ups personally and am shocked that things have appeared to continue so sharply downwards. Can we have an Extraordinary General Meeting please?

 

Other opinions?

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Some thinking about the RCO.

 

Need for a proper home

Even with a small staff, any organisation boasting more than 3000 members world-wide needs a proper base. Not all filing can be electronic, not all meetings can be effectively held via the internet or through shared telephone calls. I believe that if there was a proper home - say a redundant Methodist-style church somewhere - this would save money on a grand scale.

 

Hi

 

There will almost certainly be a redundant ex. Methodist (currently Ukrainian Catholic) church building with a 3/36 Abbott & Smith organ still in situ (organ unused since the 1960's) just round the corner from here! (Not to mention that there will be several ex-Catholic buildings available in Bradford soon. Sadly, we can't offer much in the waqy of historic organs - there was too much money floating about in the Victorian era!

 

Every Blessing

 

Tony

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Hi

 

There will almost certainly be a redundant ex. Methodist (currently Ukrainian Catholic) church building with a 3/36 Abbott & Smith organ still in situ (organ unused since the 1960's) just round the corner from here!  (Not to mention that there will be several ex-Catholic buildings available in Bradford soon.  Sadly, we can't offer much in the waqy of historic organs - there was too much money floating about in the Victorian era!

 

Every Blessing

 

Tony

 

 

====================

 

I wonder if Tony realises that Bradford used to have a Walcker organ at Otley Road, Methodist Church, in addition to the two large Annessens organs in the RC big churches.

 

There was also the magnum opus of Abbott & Smith (It may have been Abbott only) at St.Mark's, Manningham, (a very upmarket area in those days). This was a quite substantial 4- decker which, by all accounts, sounded magnificent.

 

MM

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Some thinking about the RCO.

 

Admin

In the days when I used to know the RCO well - thirty years ago (to be frank) - the College existed with a lease-held building and three paid staff - two secretaries and a permanent Clerk. There was an honorary auditor and honorary architect and one supposes a couple of cleaners! Everyone else busy on college activities was there on 'expenses-only' including the officers who were big names. The tally when you visit the present site (or read your bumph) is amazing now.  Even if you reckon that each person named might only be severely part-time (being charitable, say one day per week each) the place is positively stuffed with staff now. Interestingly, some of these appear to have regular jobs in widely separated places. Simply re-imbursing their necessary travel expenses must be a major bill.

Point? In those days the college had significantly more members and more than twice as many candidates for its examinations. No wonder it is running short of funds!

 

Question: what has been added to the workload?

1. An increased schedule of Education 'off campus' - and good for them!  Mind you, they do no more than, say, the RSCM and little more than the IAO, both of whom get considerably less in income.

2. Some technological outreach - website etc. Mind you, this is extremely weak, fails to be up-to-date and could be updated in the present quality by one school leaver working two hours a month.

3. A thicker publication (everything in bigger print than it used to be to make up for the shorter lists), and in a good year a couple of other occasional publications. None of these appear to be for any particular dead-line which must make their publication easier.  One year we received the year book a year late and misnamed - or did I dream that?

4. The effort of having to book (and pay for) places that are not their own for courses and examinations

5. Running around by secretarial staff after the huge work-force!

    Have I left anything out?

 

Need for an organ

It has become apparent that The College council feels that the importance of the organization is going to be judged on the excellence of its own organ. Can this really be the case? In the case of presenting core repertoire convincingly, the college ideally should have its own instrument with a good basic choice of stops, but in judging whether candidates can play accurately or musically will this show anything that mastering and using a 'bog-standard' three-decker can't? 

Ah, you say...we must have tracker action!  Not vital, provided that the action is efficient.  The RCO were using St.Michael's Cornhill until fairly recently, nothing tracker there!

We must have pistons! Well - while the RCO used St.Andrew's Holborn the ARCO candidates there didn't have such conveniences. 

Why should the college have an expensive new instrument - for the council to give recitals upon? To justify the RCO's existence? To add to the tally of 'fine' imported instruments? (Don't get me started!) If the courses are being held 'out in the field' (which, at least in theory, adds to their accessability - but also to their cost to put on) how necessary is a fabulous organ back at base?

 

Need for a proper home

Even with a small staff, any organisation boasting more than 3000 members world-wide needs a proper base. Not all filing can be electronic, not all meetings can be effectively held via the internet or through shared telephone calls. I believe that if there was a proper home - say a redundant Methodist-style church somewhere - this would save money on a grand scale. Every time examination sessions happen on someone else's territory there are fees to pay and major admin tasks involved. The exact location of a new home might appear to be the main question, but the critical one is:

Now they've moved around a couple of times, expanded their staff, paid all those expenses (or fees, maybe?) how much capital do they have left??

 

Worst scenario, they should still be able to rent somewhere half suitable. Pity they probably can't buy it now, but there have been mistakes along the way. Anyone can see that now.

 

What to do?

The choice of locations has to depend on whether they expect people to travel in. I think a properly run RCO needs to be pretty near the centre of a decent transport system. After leaving London (and ignoring this clause in their Charter!) Birmingham was a sensible choice.  There are still some inexpensive places to rent in the Birmingham area - ones with plenty of space.  Office work can go on in office buildings, so can lectures, meetings and examinations.

 

It has now been several months since the cancellation of 'The Big Plan' in Birmingham. During the succeeding period you would have imagined that some stategy would have been hammered out and members informed. No. if there is a plan, it hasn't been vouchsafed to those of us who actually pay their bills.  Speaking personally, I want the RCO to survive, know some of the high ups personally and am shocked that things have appeared to continue so sharply downwards. Can we have an Extraordinary General Meeting please? 

 

Other opinions?

 

=================

 

 

I still think that by incorporating the RCO into another educational body would be the perfect solution rather than the final solution; which is in danger of happening if I am reading the signs correctly.

 

Where better than Manchester, I wonder?

 

Liverpool cannot claim such a wealth of educational establishments with so many good organs, whilst the concert-halls and other musical facilities are far better than anything in London.

 

Just a thought.....I don't really care, being a Yorkshireman!

 

MM

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=================

I still think that by incorporating the RCO into another educational body would be the perfect solution rather than the final solution; which is in danger of happening if I am reading the signs correctly.

 

Where better than Manchester, I wonder?

 

Liverpool cannot claim such a wealth of educational establishments with so many good organs, whilst the concert-halls and other musical facilities are far better than anything in London.

 

Just a thought.....I don't really care, being a Yorkshireman!

 

MM

 

Manchester can certainly offer variety as regards organs in major churches/concert halls. Note that all the instruments listed below are in good working order and in accessible venues.

 

City Centre

Cathedral.

One of the last true symphonic organs to be built in this country (discuss…).

http://npor.emma.cam.ac.uk/cgi-bin/Rsearch...ec_index=R00118

St Philip’s, Salford.

Remarkable survivor from the early 19C.

http://npor.emma.cam.ac.uk/cgi-bin/Rsearch...ec_index=N06094

 

RNCM

Definitely of its time, but a fine instrument.

http://npor.emma.cam.ac.uk/cgi-bin/Rsearch...ec_index=N08877

 

Bridgwater Hall

Perhaps not all it was intended to be, but truly musical and versatile nonetheless.

http://npor.emma.cam.ac.uk/cgi-bin/Rsearch...ec_index=D03374

 

Town Hall

‘Mostly’ as ACC left it.

http://npor.emma.cam.ac.uk/cgi-bin/Rsearch...ec_index=E01157

http://npor.emma.cam.ac.uk/cgi-bin/Rsearch...ec_index=N02353

 

Whitworth hall, University of Manchester[/B]

Willis/Walker. A fine romantic instrument vandalised and emasculated in the name of organ reform. It should be preserved in its present tonal state for all time ‘lest we forget’.

http://npor.emma.cam.ac.uk/cgi-bin/Rsearch...ec_index=N01559

http://npor.emma.cam.ac.uk/cgi-bin/Rsearch...ec_index=N01620

If hearing/playing this organ becomes just too depressing, simply cross the road to…

The Holy Name

Glorious Hill. Recently restored. In an equally glorious setting/acoustic.

http://npor.emma.cam.ac.uk/cgi-bin/Rsearch...ec_index=N02185

 

 

Within 15 Miles of City Centre.

Stockport Town Hall - surely the place to be examined for FRCO??!!

http://npor.emma.cam.ac.uk/cgi-bin/Rsearch...ec_index=D07661

 

Albion URC, Ashton

http://npor.emma.cam.ac.uk/cgi-bin/Rsearch...ec_index=N10869

 

Rochdale Town Hall

http://npor.emma.cam.ac.uk/cgi-bin/Rsearch...ec_index=N01507

 

 

Cheers,

Paul.

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Guest paul@trinitymusic.karoo.co.uk
Manchester can certainly offer variety as regards organs in major churches/concert halls. Note that all the instruments listed below are in good working order and in accessible venues.

 

City Centre

Cathedral.

One of the last true symphonic organs to be built in this country (discuss…).

http://npor.emma.cam.ac.uk/cgi-bin/Rsearch...ec_index=R00118

St Philip’s, Salford.

Remarkable survivor from the early 19C.

http://npor.emma.cam.ac.uk/cgi-bin/Rsearch...ec_index=N06094

 

RNCM

Definitely of its time, but a fine instrument.

http://npor.emma.cam.ac.uk/cgi-bin/Rsearch...ec_index=N08877

 

Bridgwater Hall

Perhaps not all it was intended to be, but truly musical and versatile nonetheless.

http://npor.emma.cam.ac.uk/cgi-bin/Rsearch...ec_index=D03374

 

Town Hall

‘Mostly’ as ACC left it.

http://npor.emma.cam.ac.uk/cgi-bin/Rsearch...ec_index=E01157

http://npor.emma.cam.ac.uk/cgi-bin/Rsearch...ec_index=N02353

 

Whitworth hall, University of Manchester[/B]

Willis/Walker.  A fine romantic instrument vandalised and emasculated in the name of organ reform.  It should be preserved in its present tonal state for all time ‘lest we forget’.

http://npor.emma.cam.ac.uk/cgi-bin/Rsearch...ec_index=N01559

http://npor.emma.cam.ac.uk/cgi-bin/Rsearch...ec_index=N01620

If hearing/playing this organ becomes just too depressing, simply cross the road to…

The Holy Name

Glorious Hill.  Recently restored.  In an equally glorious setting/acoustic.

http://npor.emma.cam.ac.uk/cgi-bin/Rsearch...ec_index=N02185

Within 15 Miles of City Centre.

Stockport Town Hall - surely the place to be examined for FRCO??!!

http://npor.emma.cam.ac.uk/cgi-bin/Rsearch...ec_index=D07661

 

Albion URC, Ashton

http://npor.emma.cam.ac.uk/cgi-bin/Rsearch...ec_index=N10869

 

Rochdale Town Hall

http://npor.emma.cam.ac.uk/cgi-bin/Rsearch...ec_index=N01507

Cheers,

Paul.

 

 

You make a very good case, Sir.

I particularly love the FRCO suggestion.

 

Of course there is also The Daily Service from Manchester now!

This is truly an object lesson of various kinds in itself. 'He that hath ears to hear'.....as the good book saith. I heard it this morning and (as has happened before) found it almost impossible to tell in what language the hymns were being sung.

 

That and 'Woman's Hour' and Oasis also come from Manchester. Nuff said?

 

 

P.S. Is the big Lewis at Albion URC still safe? I had heard a rumour which I hope is untrue.

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====================

 

I wonder if Tony realises that Bradford used to have a Walcker organ at Otley Road, Methodist Church, in addition to the two large Annessens organs in the RC big churches.

 

There was also the magnum opus of Abbott & Smith (It may have been Abbott only) at St.Mark's, Manningham, (a very upmarket area in those days). This was a quite substantial 4- decker which, by all accounts, sounded magnificent.

 

MM

 

Hi

 

I did know about the Annessens - not the Walcker, and I did know of the former 4-manual in Manningham.

 

Every Blessing

 

Tony

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Manchester can certainly offer variety as regards organs in major churches/concert halls. Note that all the instruments listed below are in good working order and in accessible venues.

 

[Town Hall

‘Mostly’ as ACC left it.

http://npor.emma.cam.ac.uk/cgi-bin/Rsearch...ec_index=E01157

Cheers,

Paul.

 

Hi

 

How about that for service - the survey of the C-C in it's original form was only added to NPOR (by me) last Friday!

 

Every Blessing

 

Tony

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Hi

 

How about that for service - the survey of the C-C in it's original form was only added to NPOR (by me) last Friday!

 

Every Blessing

 

Tony

 

Thanks for the info and your committment to the NPOR, Tony. I think you forgot the stops of the Grand Orgue and is it really Vox Humaine on the Positif?

 

Cheers,

 

Michael

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