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Mander Organs
D Quentin Bellamy

Parr Hall ,warrington

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I recall that copper bass pipes inside organs in Denmark were quite common at one time.

In the UK there is the copper Ped Pr 8 in the case on the Collins organ at Shellingford, the Copley Ped 32ft in the case at Edinburgh RC Cath, and in Oxford St Mary Mag Copley used flamed copper in the North Case Gt Pr 8 (pic on NPOR) and very nice it looks too.

PJW

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On this forum, one thing tends to lead to another...

 

In MM's humorous piece, there was one line that caught my attention "... copper is never used in organ building".

 

==========================

 

 

 

The organ I play has a polished 8ft copper bass in the case, but dear old Cedric lived at a time when lead was fashionable....water pipes, closets, coffins, toy-soldiers, lead paint etc. All his hair, as well as two fingers, had been lost before the age of 30, poor man. Bad tempered even on a good day, even his most obscene gestures were done with the index finger and little finger of what remained of his right-hand; safely pre-dating Barzilian teenagers and rap-artists by almost a century.

 

Like "Brief Encounter," my little piece was (to quote Alan Bennett), "sheer calculated silliness," but I hope it raised a smile.

 

I keep promising myself to finish the heroic story of "The Lancashire Organ Crawl," which is much, much funnier for being based on factual events. I think Wigan must have a strange effect on people.....

 

 

MM

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Don't know whether it's true but I heard on the night that Warrington have agreed not to "tip it out" until a definite home is found for it. I'd like an expert comment on whether such an organ is suitable for cathedral work, after all it's very difficult to play without console assistants, RF had two although BS got away with one; no playing aids which a church organist would need as I see it. Discuss, as they say.

 

Rather mystified by MM's comment that Warrington is "remote" - it is on the main west coast main line, one London colleague came up non-stop from Euston. and the hall is 5 minutes walk from the station. By car the town is quite close to the motorway system.

 

 

Quite possibly the use of the word " remote " could be replaced by " north of Watford Gap " i.e. flat caps and the vowels to go with them , external privvies, et.al. Still mystified though as to how a town located at the confluence of a main railway line AND a motorway connection can ever be described as being remote. I am obviously missing out on something here methinks.

 

Both Myself and Mrs Adnosad thoroughly enjoyed the musical offerings given by RF and BS. Well contrasted programme items. The hall management must be thanked for their part in promoting the event as well as a certain lady, whose name I missed, who virtually single handedly organized the PR work.

 

The stage / organ was very well illuminated for the first time ever. Credit must be also given to their stage crew for their artistic efforts.

The bar service was good too!

 

Was also encouraged whilst speaking with David Wells in that he is fairly confident that there could well be another recital before too long.

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I just knew that if I mentioned that I hadn't heard about copper organ pipes, there would soon be a comprehensive list of organs that have them! Thanks chaps :P

 

Are there any particular characteristics in the way they sound?

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I just knew that if I mentioned that I hadn't heard about copper organ pipes, there would soon be a comprehensive list of organs that have them! Thanks chaps :P

 

Are there any particular characteristics in the way they sound?

 

Personally, I don't think it makes the slightest damn difference. I imagine they're less inclined to go saggy, and the 32' front at Seattle is a truly impressive sight. Considering how much trouble the bottom 5 of the 16' front at New College have staying on speech, the promptness of speech Paul Fritts has got out of these babies is astonishing. (He re-erected it after the earthquake a few years back - and now it's fixed back to the wall!)

 

I'm sure Google Images has some better images than this, but here's a small one -

 

090701_StMarkFlentrop_tmb.jpg

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Personally, I don't think it makes the slightest damn difference. I imagine they're less inclined to go saggy, and the 32' front at Seattle is a truly impressive sight. Considering how much trouble the bottom 5 of the 16' front at New College have staying on speech, the promptness of speech Paul Fritts has got out of these babies is astonishing. (He re-erected it after the earthquake a few years back - and now it's fixed back to the wall!)

 

Interesting about Seattle, if my memory is right I remember being a little shocked in 1970 by seeing that these pipes had beards. Otherwise the organ was magnificent to play and see!

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Quite possibly the use of the word " remote " could be replaced by " north of Watford Gap " i.e. flat caps and the vowels to go with them , external privvies, et.al. Still mystified though as to how a town located at the confluence of a main railway line AND a motorway connection can ever be described as being remote. I am obviously missing out on something here methinks.

 

Indeed. Terra incognita to many!

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Quite possibly the use of the word " remote " could be replaced by " north of Watford Gap " i.e. flat caps and the vowels to go with them , external privvies, et.al. Still mystified though as to how a town located at the confluence of a main railway line AND a motorway connection can ever be described as being remote. I am obviously missing out on something here methinks.

 

Both Myself and Mrs Adnosad thoroughly enjoyed the musical offerings given by RF and BS. Well contrasted programme items. The hall management must be thanked for their part in promoting the event as well as a certain lady, whose name I missed, who virtually single handedly organized the PR work.

 

The stage / organ was very well illuminated for the first time ever. Credit must be also given to their stage crew for their artistic efforts.

The bar service was good too!

 

Was also encouraged whilst speaking with David Wells in that he is fairly confident that there could well be another recital before too long.

 

Greetings Adnosad, Thank you for those kind words. I am so pleased that you were there 'on the night'. It was all worth it! Roger Fisher and Benjamin Saunders made it a truly memorable night. The Great Organ was magnificent, in spite of it's shortcomings. The Parr Hall Management were excellent.

 

I hope David Wells is proved to be right in that there could well be another recital before too long. That recital will be another 'tour de force' if we achieve it. Nothing would give me greater pleasure than to be able to post the information on this web-site.

It was good to see so many there and to be told how far some of them had travelled.

My best wishes to you, Tempo Primo.

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Quite possibly the use of the word " remote " could be replaced by " north of Watford Gap " i.e. flat caps and the vowels to go with them , external privvies, et.al. Still mystified though as to how a town located at the confluence of a main railway line AND a motorway connection can ever be described as being remote. I am obviously missing out on something here methinks.

 

 

==========================

 

I'm sorry, I used the word "remote" a little carelessly. What I meant was sort of in-between two significant cities ie: Manchester and Liverpool; each with their own considerable "organ scene."

 

Although I used to regularly nip off the M62, down into town, turn right at the roundabout, turn left and deliver the mail at the post office depot, Warrington isn't the sort of place you would normally choose to spend a day in.....a bit like Rotherham or Runcorn.

 

On the other hand, one could spend a week in Manchester or Liverpool and not see everything.

 

Apart from the POst Office, I think the nly reason I would want to go to Warrington especially, would be to hear the "Bracewell Queen" in all her glory.

 

MM

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==========================

 

I'm sorry, I used the word "remote" a little carelessly. What I meant was sort of in-between two significant cities ie: Manchester and Liverpool; each with their own considerable "organ scene."

 

Although I used to regularly nip off the M62, down into town, turn right at the roundabout, turn left and deliver the mail at the post office depot, Warrington isn't the sort of place you would normally choose to spend a day in.....a bit like Rotherham or Runcorn.

 

On the other hand, one could spend a week in Manchester or Liverpool and not see everything.

 

Apart from the POst Office, I think the nly reason I would want to go to Warrington especially, would be to hear the "Bracewell Queen" in all her glory.

 

MM

 

I am not a native of the fair town of Warringtron in case you thought I might have been upset at you " having a go " as the saying goes. I was just referring back to my dodgy old " O " level Geography!!

 

Warrington would not be a very easy place to produce a shiny brochure for in extolling its scenic/cultural/recreational features which is a great pity since due to its very geographical position this would make it an ideal place for such development.

 

The shopping centre is quite well laid out with well designed pedestrian areas but apart from the towns association with Cromwell and engineering there is not a lot left really. There is the splendid edifice of St. Elphins church with its quite magnificent organ screen which, sadly, does not have its mechanical organ operative. There is also the imposing " fortress church " designed by Pugin I believe. However even this has succumbed to the vagries of the age and is now a Climbing Centre !! However if one cares to look in one can still see vestiges of Pugins work still undisturbed i.e. the gothic ceiling decorations.

 

Finally the gates to the Town Hall are quite splendid. they were originally intended to grace Buck House but due to some dodgy politicking Victoria wouldn`t `ave `em!

 

I think they are comparable to the gates which grace a Certain Aristocratic Pile a few miles down the road but are not covered in gold leaf!!

 

Finally of course, there is always that interesting hall which contains an organ for good measure!

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