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Baroque Tricks


cornetdeschats
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Dear all,

 

Supposing one were to make a critical assessment of the discussion and particularly forms of argument surrounding organ design in Britain in the twentieth century, especially surrounding the Organ Reform Movement, what works would be considered essential reading?

 

I have copy of the Clutton & Niland The British Organ, a very general book on the Organ by Arthur Wills, and hope to get something by Bonavia Hunt. Obviously Baroque Tricks must be central -incidentally if anyone has a spare copy of this I would be delighted to purchase it-, but what other books and articles would you consider centre to the dialectic?

 

Much obliged for suggestions, Cornetdeschats (III)

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what other books and articles would you consider centre...

For consideration: Organ Building and Design, Poul-Gerhard Andersen, translated Dr Joanne Cornutt with the assistance of the self-same Ralph Downes. Reviews the tradition of European organ building, but from a Danish perspective of the 1950's (published as "Orgelbogen" in 1956).

 

But... Mr Bicknell is missing from your list? Click here for enlightenment...

 

Happy reading

 

Ian

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You don't have to be an admirer of Grant Degens and Bradbeer organs to get a good read and a lot of relevant information from

Twenty-one years of Organ-Building by Maurice Forsythe Grant.

 

ISBN 0 906894 14 X Positif Press, Oxford 1987

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I remember buying "baroque tricks" when it first came out, and although I have not been able to get my head round certain organ building principles and the technical stuff, I still found it highly entertaining ( if thats the right word) and along with Laurence Elvins Harrison Story, found out a lot more about the organ world than I would otherwise have found out by just attending recitals and talking with local association friends. Another great read was the George Thalben Ball/ Jonathan Rennert book.

regards

Peter

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