Jump to content
Mander Organ Builders Forum

N&b Symphony Organs


Guest Barry Oakley - voluntarily dereg
 Share

Recommended Posts

Guest Barry Oakley

Around the turn of the 20th century Norman & Beard produced a two-manual organ known as a "Symphony Organ." They were an off-the-shelf instrument, probably designed for private residences rather than for liturgical use. I wonder if there are any surviving examples other than one I know of?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Around the turn of the 20th century Norman & Beard produced a two-manual organ known as a "Symphony Organ." They were an off-the-shelf instrument, probably designed for private residences rather than for liturgical use. I wonder if there are any surviving examples other than one I know of?

 

Hi

 

Another one I've not heard of - but it sounds interesting, althoguh N7B were very influenced by Hope-Jones in this era. Where is the one that you know? Is it on NPOR?

 

I would suggest a search on NPOR, but considering just how many organs by N&B (or worked on by them) that there were, it would be a VERY long job. Since the old NPOR server is now not available, I currently can't access the editor-only tools that would enable a full text search, althoguh I doubt if it would have shown anything much.

 

Every Blessing

 

Tony

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I haven't come across N&B 'Symphony' organs but I do know of the 'Nordic' organs, small two manuals, usually about 3/4/1. I believe that there was one in the hotel at Euston Station at one time. The tuner I worked with as an apprentice looked after one on the outskirts of Swansea, and I now tune one in Kent, though it is not in original condition.

 

Maybe a keyword search on the NPOR using NORDIC might produce some result. Wasn't N&B's telegraphic address NORDIC ?

 

Good luck

 

Headcase

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I haven't come across N&B 'Symphony' organs but I do know of the 'Nordic' organs, small two manuals, usually about 3/4/1.  I believe that there was one in the hotel at Euston Station at one time.  The tuner I worked with as an apprentice looked after one on the outskirts of Swansea,  and I now tune one in Kent, though it is not in original condition.

 

Maybe a keyword search on the NPOR using NORDIC might produce some result. Wasn't N&B's telegraphic address NORDIC ?

 

Good luck

 

Headcase

 

Hi

 

There's no point in trying the keyword search, because the function, as far as I know, only works on the address fields - and anyway, unless the original surveyor knew and recorded the modal name, it won't be on the survey. One of the "editor only" tools does allow searching for text in other fields, but I suspect it could be a long process, and until the server move is completed, I don't have access to it anyway.

 

What period were the Nordic organs built in? It seems that a number of builders had basically standard small instruments (Bishop's Blatchington & Cecillia ranges; Compton's Miniatura; Walker "positives" etc) - and the concept is still around with the Collins EOS series.

 

Every Blessing

 

Tony

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest Barry Oakley

Hi

 

What period were the Nordic organs built in? It seems that a number of builders had basically standard small instruments (Bishop's Blatchington & Cecillia ranges; Compton's Miniatura; Walker "positives" etc) - and the concept is still around with the Collins EOS series.

 

 

 

The "Symphony Organ" had pneumatic action throughout and also had the ability to function like a pianola - i.e. using an integral mechanism it could play music from media with punched holes. The mechanism has long since disappeared. It also had what I would describe as a split stop arrangement with the split occuring around Middle C. This allowed the organist to have different stops "drawn" for the left and right hand on the same manual.

 

If I remember correctly from the console tablet, "Symphony Organs" could be purchased from a store in Regent Street, London, just after the 1914-18 war for something like £250.

 

The particular example I know of was purchased by a man named Frood, the founder of the Ferodo brake and clutch lining company, for his residence in Buxton.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi

 

What period were the Nordic organs built in? It seems that a number of builders had basically standard small instruments (Bishop's Blatchington & Cecillia ranges; Compton's Miniatura; Walker "positives" etc) - and the concept is still around with the Collins EOS series.

The "Symphony Organ" had pneumatic action throughout and also had the ability to function like a pianola - i.e. using an integral mechanism it could play music from media with punched holes. The mechanism has long since disappeared. It also had what I would describe as a split stop arrangement with the split occuring around Middle C. This allowed the organist to have different stops "drawn" for the left and right hand on the same manual.

 

If I remember correctly from the console tablet, "Symphony Organs" could be purchased from a store in Regent Street, London, just after the 1914-18 war for something like £250.

 

The particular example I know of was purchased by a man named Frood, the founder of the Ferodo brake and clutch lining company, for his residence in Buxton.

 

Thanks

 

Every Blessing

 

Tony

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest Roffensis
Around the turn of the 20th century Norman & Beard produced a two-manual organ known as a "Symphony Organ." They were an off-the-shelf instrument, probably designed for private residences rather than for liturgical use. I wonder if there are any surviving examples other than one I know of?

 

 

Isn't Bridgewater Hall based on one?! :lol:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest Roffensis
You might have a point, Roffensis. I know where you are coming from.

 

 

Aww! poor Bridgewater, actually tonally I like it, it's just a shame there was an opportunity missed with the power, which is the only thing that fails it really. Nice sound though.

Richard.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Try:

 

http://npor.emma.cam.ac.uk/cgi-bin/Rsearch...ec_index=N18148

 

Fyvie Castle, N18148 in case the above link doesn't work. Proclaims itself to be a "symphony organ"

 

 

Also, up the road from me at Somerley Park there's a 2m (N11438) which, although 2 years later, only has A compass (one above is C) and has a similar tonal pyramid, although more conventional nomenclature.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Try:

 

http://npor.emma.cam.ac.uk/cgi-bin/Rsearch...ec_index=N18148

 

Fyvie Castle, N18148 in case the above link doesn't work.  Proclaims itself to be a "symphony organ"

Also, up the road from me at Somerley Park there's a 2m (N11438) which, although 2 years later, only has A compass (one above is C) and has a similar tonal pyramid, although more conventional nomenclature.

 

Hi

 

Thanks for the reference. The NPOR link should work for the time being - I'm not sure when the actual server is being moved - if it doesn't then access via www.bios.org.uk/npor should provide a link to the new URL once it's operational.

 

Every Blessing

 

Tony

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Please sign in to comment

You will be able to leave a comment after signing in



Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...